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Micro Fluidic Channel Machining on Fused Silica Glass Using Powder Blasting

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

In this study, micro fluid channels are machined on fused silica glass via powder blasting, a mechanical etching process, and the machining characteristics of the channels are experimentally evaluated. In the process, material removal is performed by the collision of micro abrasives injected by highly compressed air on to the target surface. This approach can be characterized as an integration of brittle mode machining based on micro crack propagation. Fused silica glass, a high purity synthetic amorphous silicon dioxide, is selected as a workpiece material. It has a very low thermal expansion coefficient and excellent optical qualities and exceptional transmittance over a wide spectral range, especially in the ultraviolet range. The powder blasting process parameters affecting the machined results are injection pressure, abrasive particle size and density, stand-off distance, number of nozzle scanning, and shape/size of the required patterns. In this study, the influence of the number of nozzle scanning, abrasive particle size, and pattern size on the formation of micro channels is investigated. Machined shapes and surface roughness are measured using a 3-dimensional vision profiler and the results are discussed.

No MeSH data available.


Basic material removal mechanism of powder blasting.
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f1-sensors-08-00700: Basic material removal mechanism of powder blasting.

Mentions: The process parameters of powder blasting are: (1) blasting pressure, time, and velocity; (2) material properties, size and density of the abrasives; (3) velocity and number of nozzle scanning; and (4) stand-off distance (distance between the nozzle and workpiece). These parameters should be appropriately determined to improve machining accuracy and efficiency. The basic principle of the machining process is illustrated in Figure 1.


Micro Fluidic Channel Machining on Fused Silica Glass Using Powder Blasting
Basic material removal mechanism of powder blasting.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3927535&req=5

f1-sensors-08-00700: Basic material removal mechanism of powder blasting.
Mentions: The process parameters of powder blasting are: (1) blasting pressure, time, and velocity; (2) material properties, size and density of the abrasives; (3) velocity and number of nozzle scanning; and (4) stand-off distance (distance between the nozzle and workpiece). These parameters should be appropriately determined to improve machining accuracy and efficiency. The basic principle of the machining process is illustrated in Figure 1.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

In this study, micro fluid channels are machined on fused silica glass via powder blasting, a mechanical etching process, and the machining characteristics of the channels are experimentally evaluated. In the process, material removal is performed by the collision of micro abrasives injected by highly compressed air on to the target surface. This approach can be characterized as an integration of brittle mode machining based on micro crack propagation. Fused silica glass, a high purity synthetic amorphous silicon dioxide, is selected as a workpiece material. It has a very low thermal expansion coefficient and excellent optical qualities and exceptional transmittance over a wide spectral range, especially in the ultraviolet range. The powder blasting process parameters affecting the machined results are injection pressure, abrasive particle size and density, stand-off distance, number of nozzle scanning, and shape/size of the required patterns. In this study, the influence of the number of nozzle scanning, abrasive particle size, and pattern size on the formation of micro channels is investigated. Machined shapes and surface roughness are measured using a 3-dimensional vision profiler and the results are discussed.

No MeSH data available.