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Using Geospatial Information Technology in Natural Resources Management: The Case of Urban Land Management In West Africa

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

In the past several decades, Lagos Metropolis emerged as one of the fastest urbanizing cities in the West African Sub-region. In the absence of a regular use of geospatial information management systems, limited effort had been made to keep track of changes in the natural environment in the rapidly growing city for policy making in land administration. The ubiquitous energy radiated by the rapid urbanization rate in the area not only created unprecedented consequences by diminishing the quality of the environment and natural resources but it raises serious implications for land management in the region. The factors fuelling the land crisis in the area which are not far fetched consists of socio-economic, ecological and policy elements. To tackle these issues in a mega city, up-to-date knowledge would be required to capture and analyze land information trends. Such an effort will help manage the city's expansion as well as infrastructure development through the right choices in planning and (spatial) designs using the latest tools in geospatial technologies of Geographic Information Systems GIS) and remote sensing. This study investigates the spatial implications of the rapid expansion of metropolitan Lagos for land management using GIS and Remote sensing technology. The result of the research provides a valuable road map that can enable planners contribute to improved land administration necessary for effective management of natural resources.

No MeSH data available.


2000 False-Color Composite (742) ETM+ Image of Lagos and its Vicinity.
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f5-sensors-08-00607: 2000 False-Color Composite (742) ETM+ Image of Lagos and its Vicinity.

Mentions: Figures 4 and 5 also show the results of the false-color composites for 1984 and 2000 images. In these images, the relatively dark-brown areas represent the built up and heavily populated area, whereas greenish areas are vegetation. The deep blue regions are the water bodies. While these figures show the tremendous rate of urban expansion between 1984 and 2000, it is safe to say also based on figures 1, 2, 3 and 4, that the population of the Lagos seems to have doubled between 1984 and 2000. This not only puts a tremendous pressure on the resources of the city, but it has the potentials to aggravate flooding of the Lagos area due to its location on a floodplain.


Using Geospatial Information Technology in Natural Resources Management: The Case of Urban Land Management In West Africa
2000 False-Color Composite (742) ETM+ Image of Lagos and its Vicinity.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3927520&req=5

f5-sensors-08-00607: 2000 False-Color Composite (742) ETM+ Image of Lagos and its Vicinity.
Mentions: Figures 4 and 5 also show the results of the false-color composites for 1984 and 2000 images. In these images, the relatively dark-brown areas represent the built up and heavily populated area, whereas greenish areas are vegetation. The deep blue regions are the water bodies. While these figures show the tremendous rate of urban expansion between 1984 and 2000, it is safe to say also based on figures 1, 2, 3 and 4, that the population of the Lagos seems to have doubled between 1984 and 2000. This not only puts a tremendous pressure on the resources of the city, but it has the potentials to aggravate flooding of the Lagos area due to its location on a floodplain.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

In the past several decades, Lagos Metropolis emerged as one of the fastest urbanizing cities in the West African Sub-region. In the absence of a regular use of geospatial information management systems, limited effort had been made to keep track of changes in the natural environment in the rapidly growing city for policy making in land administration. The ubiquitous energy radiated by the rapid urbanization rate in the area not only created unprecedented consequences by diminishing the quality of the environment and natural resources but it raises serious implications for land management in the region. The factors fuelling the land crisis in the area which are not far fetched consists of socio-economic, ecological and policy elements. To tackle these issues in a mega city, up-to-date knowledge would be required to capture and analyze land information trends. Such an effort will help manage the city's expansion as well as infrastructure development through the right choices in planning and (spatial) designs using the latest tools in geospatial technologies of Geographic Information Systems GIS) and remote sensing. This study investigates the spatial implications of the rapid expansion of metropolitan Lagos for land management using GIS and Remote sensing technology. The result of the research provides a valuable road map that can enable planners contribute to improved land administration necessary for effective management of natural resources.

No MeSH data available.