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Ocean Color Inferred from Radiometers on Low-Flying Aircraft

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

The color of sunlight reflected from the ocean to orbiting visible radiometers has provided a great deal of information about the global ocean, after suitable corrections are made for atmospheric effects. Similar ocean-color measurements can be made from a low-flying aircraft to get higher spatial resolution and to obtain measurements under clouds. A different set of corrections is required in this case, and we describe algorithms to correct for clouds and sea-surface effects. An example is presented and errors in the corrections discussed.

No MeSH data available.


Schematic of measurement geometry showing the four contributions to the zenith radiance in Eq. (2).
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f1-sensors-08-00860: Schematic of measurement geometry showing the four contributions to the zenith radiance in Eq. (2).

Mentions: The remote sensing reflectance at an optical wavelength λ is defined as [7]:(1)RRS(λ)=LW(λ)E(λ),where LW is the water-leaving radiance propagating in the zenith direction and E is the irradiance incident on the surface. Where multiple scattering in the atmosphere is negligible, the zenith-propagating radiance measured at the aircraft is the sum of the water leaving radiance and contributions from surface reflections. For each wavelength, this can be expressed as:(2)L=LW+LG+LF+LS,where LG is the radiance from sun glints, LF is the radiance from foam on the surface, and LS is the specular reflection of skylight from the surface. These contributions are shown schematically in Fig. 1.


Ocean Color Inferred from Radiometers on Low-Flying Aircraft
Schematic of measurement geometry showing the four contributions to the zenith radiance in Eq. (2).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3927510&req=5

f1-sensors-08-00860: Schematic of measurement geometry showing the four contributions to the zenith radiance in Eq. (2).
Mentions: The remote sensing reflectance at an optical wavelength λ is defined as [7]:(1)RRS(λ)=LW(λ)E(λ),where LW is the water-leaving radiance propagating in the zenith direction and E is the irradiance incident on the surface. Where multiple scattering in the atmosphere is negligible, the zenith-propagating radiance measured at the aircraft is the sum of the water leaving radiance and contributions from surface reflections. For each wavelength, this can be expressed as:(2)L=LW+LG+LF+LS,where LG is the radiance from sun glints, LF is the radiance from foam on the surface, and LS is the specular reflection of skylight from the surface. These contributions are shown schematically in Fig. 1.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

The color of sunlight reflected from the ocean to orbiting visible radiometers has provided a great deal of information about the global ocean, after suitable corrections are made for atmospheric effects. Similar ocean-color measurements can be made from a low-flying aircraft to get higher spatial resolution and to obtain measurements under clouds. A different set of corrections is required in this case, and we describe algorithms to correct for clouds and sea-surface effects. An example is presented and errors in the corrections discussed.

No MeSH data available.