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Improving Distributed Runoff Prediction in Urbanized Catchments with Remote Sensing based Estimates of Impervious Surface Cover

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ABSTRACT

The amount and intensity of runoff on catchment scale are strongly determined by the presence of impervious land-cover types, which are the predominant cover types in urbanized areas. This paper examines the impact of different methods for estimating impervious surface cover on the prediction of peak discharges, as determined by a fully distributed rainfall-runoff model (WetSpa), for the upper part of the Woluwe River catchment in the southeastern part of Brussels. The study shows that detailed information on the spatial distribution of impervious surfaces, as obtained from remotely sensed data, produces substantially different estimates of peak discharges than traditional approaches based on expert judgment of average imperviousness for different types of urban land use. The study also demonstrates that sub-pixel estimation of imperviousness may be a useful alternative for more expensive high-resolution mapping for rainfall-runoff modelling at catchment scale.

No MeSH data available.


Location of the Upper Woluwe catchment.
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f1-sensors-08-00910: Location of the Upper Woluwe catchment.

Mentions: The Woluwe is a small river that is part of the Scheldt basin. The upper part of the Woluwe catchment up to the Goubert gauge was selected as a study area (Figure 1). The upstream part of this area lies in the protected zone of the Sonian forest. In the downstream part, the Woluwe River flows partially through several vaulted stretches and park and pond systems. The Upper Woluwe catchment comprises approximately 31 km2. The elevation of the catchment ranges from 49 m to 129 m, with an average of 94 m above sea level. Elevation increases gradually from the north to the south, with slopes varying between 0 and 22 %, with an average of 6 %. According to the Royal Meteorological Institute at Ukkel, located close to the catchment border (Figure 1), the long-term yearly precipitation is 780 mm/year, 380 mm in the winter and 400 mm in the summer. The long-term open-water potential evaporation of Ukkel is 657 mm/year, the winter evaporation is 114 mm, the summer evaporation 543 mm. The average temperature is 5.0°C for the winter season and 14.1°C for the summer season. The Woluwe catchment consists for 96 % of the area of loam soils, while the remaining 4 % are occupied by sandy loam soils.


Improving Distributed Runoff Prediction in Urbanized Catchments with Remote Sensing based Estimates of Impervious Surface Cover
Location of the Upper Woluwe catchment.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3927506&req=5

f1-sensors-08-00910: Location of the Upper Woluwe catchment.
Mentions: The Woluwe is a small river that is part of the Scheldt basin. The upper part of the Woluwe catchment up to the Goubert gauge was selected as a study area (Figure 1). The upstream part of this area lies in the protected zone of the Sonian forest. In the downstream part, the Woluwe River flows partially through several vaulted stretches and park and pond systems. The Upper Woluwe catchment comprises approximately 31 km2. The elevation of the catchment ranges from 49 m to 129 m, with an average of 94 m above sea level. Elevation increases gradually from the north to the south, with slopes varying between 0 and 22 %, with an average of 6 %. According to the Royal Meteorological Institute at Ukkel, located close to the catchment border (Figure 1), the long-term yearly precipitation is 780 mm/year, 380 mm in the winter and 400 mm in the summer. The long-term open-water potential evaporation of Ukkel is 657 mm/year, the winter evaporation is 114 mm, the summer evaporation 543 mm. The average temperature is 5.0°C for the winter season and 14.1°C for the summer season. The Woluwe catchment consists for 96 % of the area of loam soils, while the remaining 4 % are occupied by sandy loam soils.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

The amount and intensity of runoff on catchment scale are strongly determined by the presence of impervious land-cover types, which are the predominant cover types in urbanized areas. This paper examines the impact of different methods for estimating impervious surface cover on the prediction of peak discharges, as determined by a fully distributed rainfall-runoff model (WetSpa), for the upper part of the Woluwe River catchment in the southeastern part of Brussels. The study shows that detailed information on the spatial distribution of impervious surfaces, as obtained from remotely sensed data, produces substantially different estimates of peak discharges than traditional approaches based on expert judgment of average imperviousness for different types of urban land use. The study also demonstrates that sub-pixel estimation of imperviousness may be a useful alternative for more expensive high-resolution mapping for rainfall-runoff modelling at catchment scale.

No MeSH data available.