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Comparative study on the microbiological features of angular cheilitis in HIV seropositive and HIV seronegative patients from South India.

Krishnan PA, Kannan R - J Oral Maxillofac Pathol (2013)

Bottom Line: This study was designed to compare the microbiological features of angular cheilitis (AC) in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) seropositive and HIV seronegative individuals, in a group of south Indians.Candidal colonies were further speciated by the conventional biotyping technique.The present study suggests a definite difference in the microbial flora of AC in HIV seropositive patients than that of HIV seronegative population.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Pathology, College of Dentistry, Salman Bin Abdulaziz University, Al-Kharj, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia.

ABSTRACT

Objective: This study was designed to compare the microbiological features of angular cheilitis (AC) in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) seropositive and HIV seronegative individuals, in a group of south Indians.

Materials and methods: Swabs from oral commissures of 46 patients were obtained and inoculated on to Sabouraud's dextrose agar (SDA) supplemented with chloramphenicol, blood agar (BA) and MacConkey's agar (MCA) plates and cultured. α-hemolytic Streptococci, Staphylococcus albus, Staphylococcus aureus, Candida species, Klebsiella species and Pseudomonas species were cultured. Candidal colonies were further speciated by the conventional biotyping technique.

Results: In AC of HIV seropositive patients Candida albicans and Staphylococcus aureus were more prevalent than that in HIV seronegative patients. Incidentally in patients with CD4 cell count less than 200 there was an increase in the incidence of Candidal and Staphylococcus aureus colonization when compared to patients with CD4 cell count higher than 200.

Conclusion: The present study suggests a definite difference in the microbial flora of AC in HIV seropositive patients than that of HIV seronegative population.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Microbiology of angular cheilitis in 16 HIV seronegative patients. Staph albus: Staphylococcus albus, Staph aureus: Staphylococcus aureus, HIV: human immunodeficiency virus
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Figure 7: Microbiology of angular cheilitis in 16 HIV seronegative patients. Staph albus: Staphylococcus albus, Staph aureus: Staphylococcus aureus, HIV: human immunodeficiency virus

Mentions: The male:female ratio of this group was 5:3. The age group of these patients ranged from 18 to 50 years. Staphylococcus albus was isolated from 69%, Staphylococcus aureus from 13% and Candida species from 56% of the patients. Twenty-five percent of the patients showed mixed flora of Staphylococcus albus and Candida species. None of the patients showed mixed flora with Staphylococcus aureus and Candida species. In this group, patients with Hb less than 14 g/dL, Staphylococcus albus was isolated from 70%, Staphylococcus aureus from 20% and Candida species from 60% of the patients. Mixed flora of Staphylococcus albus and Candida species were seen in 30% of the patients. In patients with Hb more than 14 g/dL, Staphylococcus albus was isolated from 50% and Candida species was from 50% of the patients. Staphylococcus aureus was not isolated from any of the patients. Mixed flora of Staphylococcus albus and Candida species was seen in 17% of the patients [Graph 4].


Comparative study on the microbiological features of angular cheilitis in HIV seropositive and HIV seronegative patients from South India.

Krishnan PA, Kannan R - J Oral Maxillofac Pathol (2013)

Microbiology of angular cheilitis in 16 HIV seronegative patients. Staph albus: Staphylococcus albus, Staph aureus: Staphylococcus aureus, HIV: human immunodeficiency virus
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3927333&req=5

Figure 7: Microbiology of angular cheilitis in 16 HIV seronegative patients. Staph albus: Staphylococcus albus, Staph aureus: Staphylococcus aureus, HIV: human immunodeficiency virus
Mentions: The male:female ratio of this group was 5:3. The age group of these patients ranged from 18 to 50 years. Staphylococcus albus was isolated from 69%, Staphylococcus aureus from 13% and Candida species from 56% of the patients. Twenty-five percent of the patients showed mixed flora of Staphylococcus albus and Candida species. None of the patients showed mixed flora with Staphylococcus aureus and Candida species. In this group, patients with Hb less than 14 g/dL, Staphylococcus albus was isolated from 70%, Staphylococcus aureus from 20% and Candida species from 60% of the patients. Mixed flora of Staphylococcus albus and Candida species were seen in 30% of the patients. In patients with Hb more than 14 g/dL, Staphylococcus albus was isolated from 50% and Candida species was from 50% of the patients. Staphylococcus aureus was not isolated from any of the patients. Mixed flora of Staphylococcus albus and Candida species was seen in 17% of the patients [Graph 4].

Bottom Line: This study was designed to compare the microbiological features of angular cheilitis (AC) in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) seropositive and HIV seronegative individuals, in a group of south Indians.Candidal colonies were further speciated by the conventional biotyping technique.The present study suggests a definite difference in the microbial flora of AC in HIV seropositive patients than that of HIV seronegative population.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Pathology, College of Dentistry, Salman Bin Abdulaziz University, Al-Kharj, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia.

ABSTRACT

Objective: This study was designed to compare the microbiological features of angular cheilitis (AC) in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) seropositive and HIV seronegative individuals, in a group of south Indians.

Materials and methods: Swabs from oral commissures of 46 patients were obtained and inoculated on to Sabouraud's dextrose agar (SDA) supplemented with chloramphenicol, blood agar (BA) and MacConkey's agar (MCA) plates and cultured. α-hemolytic Streptococci, Staphylococcus albus, Staphylococcus aureus, Candida species, Klebsiella species and Pseudomonas species were cultured. Candidal colonies were further speciated by the conventional biotyping technique.

Results: In AC of HIV seropositive patients Candida albicans and Staphylococcus aureus were more prevalent than that in HIV seronegative patients. Incidentally in patients with CD4 cell count less than 200 there was an increase in the incidence of Candidal and Staphylococcus aureus colonization when compared to patients with CD4 cell count higher than 200.

Conclusion: The present study suggests a definite difference in the microbial flora of AC in HIV seropositive patients than that of HIV seronegative population.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus