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Syllable frequency and word frequency effects in spoken and written word production in a non-alphabetic script.

Zhang Q, Wang C - Front Psychol (2014)

Bottom Line: Significant facilitatory WF and SF effects were observed in spoken as well as in written production.However, the SF effect over repetitions was divergent in both modalities: it was significant in the former two repetitions in spoken whereas it was significant in the second repetition only in written.The implications of these results on written production models are discussed.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychology, Renmin University of China Beijing, China ; Key Laboratory of Behavioral Science, Institute of Psychology, Chinese Academy of Sciences Beijing, China.

ABSTRACT
The effects of word frequency (WF) and syllable frequency (SF) are well-established phenomena in domain such as spoken production in alphabetic languages. Chinese, as a non-alphabetic language, presents unique lexical and phonological properties in speech production. For example, the proximate unit of phonological encoding is syllable in Chinese but segments in Dutch, French or English. The present study investigated the effects of WF and SF, and their interaction in Chinese written and spoken production. Significant facilitatory WF and SF effects were observed in spoken as well as in written production. The SF effect in writing indicated that phonological properties (i.e., syllabic frequency) constrain orthographic output via a lexical route, at least, in Chinese written production. However, the SF effect over repetitions was divergent in both modalities: it was significant in the former two repetitions in spoken whereas it was significant in the second repetition only in written. Due to the fragility of the SF effect in writing, we suggest that the phonological influence in handwritten production is not mandatory and universal, and it is modulated by experimental manipulations. This provides evidence for the orthographic autonomy hypothesis, rather than the phonological mediation hypothesis. The absence of an interaction between WF and SF showed that the SF effect is independent of the WF effect in spoken and written output modalities. The implications of these results on written production models are discussed.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Mean naming latencies in written responses by WF, SF, and repetitions (L, Low; H, High; WF, Word Frequency; SF, Syllable Frequency).
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Figure 2: Mean naming latencies in written responses by WF, SF, and repetitions (L, Low; H, High; WF, Word Frequency; SF, Syllable Frequency).

Mentions: Data from incorrect responses (0.81%), writing latencies longer than 2000 ms or shorter than 300 ms (1.88%), and latencies deviating 2.5 standard deviations from the cell mean (2.36%) were removed from all analyses. The remaining data were used in the subsequent statistical analysis. Figure 2 presents the mean written latencies, presented by WF, SF, and Repetition.


Syllable frequency and word frequency effects in spoken and written word production in a non-alphabetic script.

Zhang Q, Wang C - Front Psychol (2014)

Mean naming latencies in written responses by WF, SF, and repetitions (L, Low; H, High; WF, Word Frequency; SF, Syllable Frequency).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3927083&req=5

Figure 2: Mean naming latencies in written responses by WF, SF, and repetitions (L, Low; H, High; WF, Word Frequency; SF, Syllable Frequency).
Mentions: Data from incorrect responses (0.81%), writing latencies longer than 2000 ms or shorter than 300 ms (1.88%), and latencies deviating 2.5 standard deviations from the cell mean (2.36%) were removed from all analyses. The remaining data were used in the subsequent statistical analysis. Figure 2 presents the mean written latencies, presented by WF, SF, and Repetition.

Bottom Line: Significant facilitatory WF and SF effects were observed in spoken as well as in written production.However, the SF effect over repetitions was divergent in both modalities: it was significant in the former two repetitions in spoken whereas it was significant in the second repetition only in written.The implications of these results on written production models are discussed.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychology, Renmin University of China Beijing, China ; Key Laboratory of Behavioral Science, Institute of Psychology, Chinese Academy of Sciences Beijing, China.

ABSTRACT
The effects of word frequency (WF) and syllable frequency (SF) are well-established phenomena in domain such as spoken production in alphabetic languages. Chinese, as a non-alphabetic language, presents unique lexical and phonological properties in speech production. For example, the proximate unit of phonological encoding is syllable in Chinese but segments in Dutch, French or English. The present study investigated the effects of WF and SF, and their interaction in Chinese written and spoken production. Significant facilitatory WF and SF effects were observed in spoken as well as in written production. The SF effect in writing indicated that phonological properties (i.e., syllabic frequency) constrain orthographic output via a lexical route, at least, in Chinese written production. However, the SF effect over repetitions was divergent in both modalities: it was significant in the former two repetitions in spoken whereas it was significant in the second repetition only in written. Due to the fragility of the SF effect in writing, we suggest that the phonological influence in handwritten production is not mandatory and universal, and it is modulated by experimental manipulations. This provides evidence for the orthographic autonomy hypothesis, rather than the phonological mediation hypothesis. The absence of an interaction between WF and SF showed that the SF effect is independent of the WF effect in spoken and written output modalities. The implications of these results on written production models are discussed.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus