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Play it again, Sam: brain correlates of emotional music recognition.

Altenmüller E, Siggel S, Mohammadi B, Samii A, Münte TF - Front Psychol (2014)

Bottom Line: For recognized vs. not recognized old pieces a focused activation in the right inferior frontal gyrus and the left cerebellum was found.Positive pieces activated the left medial frontal gyrus, the left precuneus, the right superior frontal gyrus, the left posterior cingulate, the bilateral middle temporal gyrus, and the left thalamus compared to less positive pieces.The results imply that the valence of a music piece is important for memory performance and is recognized very fast.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Music Physiology and Musicians's Medicine, University of Music, Drama and Media Hannover, Germany.

ABSTRACT

Background: Music can elicit strong emotions and can be remembered in connection with these emotions even decades later. Yet, the brain correlates of episodic memory for highly emotional music compared with less emotional music have not been examined. We therefore used fMRI to investigate brain structures activated by emotional processing of short excerpts of film music successfully retrieved from episodic long-term memory.

Methods: Eighteen non-musicians volunteers were exposed to 60 structurally similar pieces of film music of 10 s length with high arousal ratings and either less positive or very positive valence ratings. Two similar sets of 30 pieces were created. Each of these was presented to half of the participants during the encoding session outside of the scanner, while all stimuli were used during the second recognition session inside the MRI-scanner. During fMRI each stimulation period (10 s) was followed by a 20 s resting period during which participants pressed either the "old" or the "new" button to indicate whether they had heard the piece before.

Results: Musical stimuli vs. silence activated the bilateral superior temporal gyrus, right insula, right middle frontal gyrus, bilateral medial frontal gyrus and the left anterior cerebellum. Old pieces led to activation in the left medial dorsal thalamus and left midbrain compared to new pieces. For recognized vs. not recognized old pieces a focused activation in the right inferior frontal gyrus and the left cerebellum was found. Positive pieces activated the left medial frontal gyrus, the left precuneus, the right superior frontal gyrus, the left posterior cingulate, the bilateral middle temporal gyrus, and the left thalamus compared to less positive pieces.

Conclusion: Specific brain networks related to memory retrieval and emotional processing of symphonic film music were identified. The results imply that the valence of a music piece is important for memory performance and is recognized very fast.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Contrast of recognized positive > recognized less positive target pieces over all participants. The red-colored regions represent activation for the recognized positive target pieces. p < 0.001 (not corrected).
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Figure 3: Contrast of recognized positive > recognized less positive target pieces over all participants. The red-colored regions represent activation for the recognized positive target pieces. p < 0.001 (not corrected).

Mentions: The contrast recognized positive > recognized less positive yielded activation in the left superior and middle frontal gyrus, the bilateral medial frontal gyrus, the right superior temporal gyrus and the temporal pole, the left posterior cingulate and the left precuneus. Furthermore, activations were observed in the left precentral gyrus, the bilateral thalamus as well as in the bilateral anterior cerebellum and the right posterior cerebellum (Figure 3, Table 1).


Play it again, Sam: brain correlates of emotional music recognition.

Altenmüller E, Siggel S, Mohammadi B, Samii A, Münte TF - Front Psychol (2014)

Contrast of recognized positive > recognized less positive target pieces over all participants. The red-colored regions represent activation for the recognized positive target pieces. p < 0.001 (not corrected).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3927073&req=5

Figure 3: Contrast of recognized positive > recognized less positive target pieces over all participants. The red-colored regions represent activation for the recognized positive target pieces. p < 0.001 (not corrected).
Mentions: The contrast recognized positive > recognized less positive yielded activation in the left superior and middle frontal gyrus, the bilateral medial frontal gyrus, the right superior temporal gyrus and the temporal pole, the left posterior cingulate and the left precuneus. Furthermore, activations were observed in the left precentral gyrus, the bilateral thalamus as well as in the bilateral anterior cerebellum and the right posterior cerebellum (Figure 3, Table 1).

Bottom Line: For recognized vs. not recognized old pieces a focused activation in the right inferior frontal gyrus and the left cerebellum was found.Positive pieces activated the left medial frontal gyrus, the left precuneus, the right superior frontal gyrus, the left posterior cingulate, the bilateral middle temporal gyrus, and the left thalamus compared to less positive pieces.The results imply that the valence of a music piece is important for memory performance and is recognized very fast.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Music Physiology and Musicians's Medicine, University of Music, Drama and Media Hannover, Germany.

ABSTRACT

Background: Music can elicit strong emotions and can be remembered in connection with these emotions even decades later. Yet, the brain correlates of episodic memory for highly emotional music compared with less emotional music have not been examined. We therefore used fMRI to investigate brain structures activated by emotional processing of short excerpts of film music successfully retrieved from episodic long-term memory.

Methods: Eighteen non-musicians volunteers were exposed to 60 structurally similar pieces of film music of 10 s length with high arousal ratings and either less positive or very positive valence ratings. Two similar sets of 30 pieces were created. Each of these was presented to half of the participants during the encoding session outside of the scanner, while all stimuli were used during the second recognition session inside the MRI-scanner. During fMRI each stimulation period (10 s) was followed by a 20 s resting period during which participants pressed either the "old" or the "new" button to indicate whether they had heard the piece before.

Results: Musical stimuli vs. silence activated the bilateral superior temporal gyrus, right insula, right middle frontal gyrus, bilateral medial frontal gyrus and the left anterior cerebellum. Old pieces led to activation in the left medial dorsal thalamus and left midbrain compared to new pieces. For recognized vs. not recognized old pieces a focused activation in the right inferior frontal gyrus and the left cerebellum was found. Positive pieces activated the left medial frontal gyrus, the left precuneus, the right superior frontal gyrus, the left posterior cingulate, the bilateral middle temporal gyrus, and the left thalamus compared to less positive pieces.

Conclusion: Specific brain networks related to memory retrieval and emotional processing of symphonic film music were identified. The results imply that the valence of a music piece is important for memory performance and is recognized very fast.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus