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Lumbar Extension during Stoop Lifting is Delayed by the Load and Hamstring Tightness.

Iwasaki R, Yokoyama G, Kawabata S, Suzuki T - J Phys Ther Sci (2014)

Bottom Line: Additionally, a positive correlation was observed between sacral inclination angle and hip flexion range of motion during the straight leg raise test. [Conclusion] We found that a disorder of the lumbar pelvic rhythm can be caused by both load and hamstring tightness.In the initial phase of stoop lifting, delayed lumbar extension is likely to lead to an increase in spinal instability and stress on the posterior ligamentous system.This mechanism shows that stoop lifting of a load may be harmful to the lower back of people with hamstring tightness.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Rehabilitation, Saiseikai Kanagawa Hospital, Japan.

ABSTRACT
[Purpose] This study investigated the relationship between lumbar pelvic rhythm and the physical characteristics of stoop lifting. [Subjects and Methods] Participants performed a stoop lifting task under two conditions: with and without load. We assessed the lumbar kyphosis and sacral inclination angles using the SpinalMouse(®) system, as well as hamstring flexibility. During stoop lifting, surface electromyograms and the lumbar and sacral motions were recorded using a multi-channel telemetry system and flexible electrogoniometers. [Results] In the initial phase of lifting, lumbar extension was delayed by load; the delay showed a negative correlation with sacral inclination angle at trunk flexion, whereas a positive correlation was observed with electromyogram activity of the lumbar multifidus. Additionally, a positive correlation was observed between sacral inclination angle and hip flexion range of motion during the straight leg raise test. [Conclusion] We found that a disorder of the lumbar pelvic rhythm can be caused by both load and hamstring tightness. In the initial phase of stoop lifting, delayed lumbar extension is likely to lead to an increase in spinal instability and stress on the posterior ligamentous system. This mechanism shows that stoop lifting of a load may be harmful to the lower back of people with hamstring tightness.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

The lumbar pelvic rhythm during stoop lifting with or without load. Normalizedextension in lumbar spine and sacrum are plotted against the percentage of totalextension. The graph of lumbar spine is shifted to the right because of a delay inlumbar extension at the initial phase of lifting.
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fig_001: The lumbar pelvic rhythm during stoop lifting with or without load. Normalizedextension in lumbar spine and sacrum are plotted against the percentage of totalextension. The graph of lumbar spine is shifted to the right because of a delay inlumbar extension at the initial phase of lifting.

Mentions: During stoop lifting without load, changes involving the posterior tilt of the pelvis weregreater during the first half of the lifting movement, whereas changes involving theextension of the lumbar spine were greater during the latter half (Fig. 1Fig. 1.


Lumbar Extension during Stoop Lifting is Delayed by the Load and Hamstring Tightness.

Iwasaki R, Yokoyama G, Kawabata S, Suzuki T - J Phys Ther Sci (2014)

The lumbar pelvic rhythm during stoop lifting with or without load. Normalizedextension in lumbar spine and sacrum are plotted against the percentage of totalextension. The graph of lumbar spine is shifted to the right because of a delay inlumbar extension at the initial phase of lifting.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3927042&req=5

fig_001: The lumbar pelvic rhythm during stoop lifting with or without load. Normalizedextension in lumbar spine and sacrum are plotted against the percentage of totalextension. The graph of lumbar spine is shifted to the right because of a delay inlumbar extension at the initial phase of lifting.
Mentions: During stoop lifting without load, changes involving the posterior tilt of the pelvis weregreater during the first half of the lifting movement, whereas changes involving theextension of the lumbar spine were greater during the latter half (Fig. 1Fig. 1.

Bottom Line: Additionally, a positive correlation was observed between sacral inclination angle and hip flexion range of motion during the straight leg raise test. [Conclusion] We found that a disorder of the lumbar pelvic rhythm can be caused by both load and hamstring tightness.In the initial phase of stoop lifting, delayed lumbar extension is likely to lead to an increase in spinal instability and stress on the posterior ligamentous system.This mechanism shows that stoop lifting of a load may be harmful to the lower back of people with hamstring tightness.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Rehabilitation, Saiseikai Kanagawa Hospital, Japan.

ABSTRACT
[Purpose] This study investigated the relationship between lumbar pelvic rhythm and the physical characteristics of stoop lifting. [Subjects and Methods] Participants performed a stoop lifting task under two conditions: with and without load. We assessed the lumbar kyphosis and sacral inclination angles using the SpinalMouse(®) system, as well as hamstring flexibility. During stoop lifting, surface electromyograms and the lumbar and sacral motions were recorded using a multi-channel telemetry system and flexible electrogoniometers. [Results] In the initial phase of lifting, lumbar extension was delayed by load; the delay showed a negative correlation with sacral inclination angle at trunk flexion, whereas a positive correlation was observed with electromyogram activity of the lumbar multifidus. Additionally, a positive correlation was observed between sacral inclination angle and hip flexion range of motion during the straight leg raise test. [Conclusion] We found that a disorder of the lumbar pelvic rhythm can be caused by both load and hamstring tightness. In the initial phase of stoop lifting, delayed lumbar extension is likely to lead to an increase in spinal instability and stress on the posterior ligamentous system. This mechanism shows that stoop lifting of a load may be harmful to the lower back of people with hamstring tightness.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus