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Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis in HIV-infected patients: report of 2 cases.

Mwita JC, Baliki K, Tema L - Pan Afr Med J (2013)

Bottom Line: Infection with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is associated with increased risk of cerebrovascular disease; however Cerebral Venous Sinus Thrombosis (CVST) is rarely associated with HIV-related cerebrovascular events.We describe two cases of HIV-positive patients who, at the same time, presented to our hospital with deep cerebral venous thrombosis and stroke.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Internal Medicine, University of Botswana, Gaborone, Botswana ; Department of Internal Medicine, Princess Marina Hospital, Gaborone, Botswana.

ABSTRACT
Infection with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is associated with increased risk of cerebrovascular disease; however Cerebral Venous Sinus Thrombosis (CVST) is rarely associated with HIV-related cerebrovascular events. We describe two cases of HIV-positive patients who, at the same time, presented to our hospital with deep cerebral venous thrombosis and stroke.

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Magnetic Resonance Venography demonstrating thrombosis of the superior sagittal sinus
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Figure 0001: Magnetic Resonance Venography demonstrating thrombosis of the superior sagittal sinus

Mentions: One day after admission she had about 10 episodes of sided convulsions, with residual right sided hemiparesis. The power of all the muscle groups in the right upper and lower limbs was grade 2/5. A Magnetic Resonance venography established superior sagittal and left transverse sinuses thrombosis (Figure 1). Furthermore, there were venous infarction with haemorrhagic component and oedema in the left frontal, temporal, occipital and parietal lobes. In addition to continuation of anticoagulation, anticonvulsants were optimized to control convulsions. There was a reduction of seizure episodes over the subsequent five days and the patient's neurological deficit slowly normalized inthe next three weeks. She was then discharged home with mild hemiparesis and her subsequent outpatient visits showed no neurologic deterioration.


Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis in HIV-infected patients: report of 2 cases.

Mwita JC, Baliki K, Tema L - Pan Afr Med J (2013)

Magnetic Resonance Venography demonstrating thrombosis of the superior sagittal sinus
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3926758&req=5

Figure 0001: Magnetic Resonance Venography demonstrating thrombosis of the superior sagittal sinus
Mentions: One day after admission she had about 10 episodes of sided convulsions, with residual right sided hemiparesis. The power of all the muscle groups in the right upper and lower limbs was grade 2/5. A Magnetic Resonance venography established superior sagittal and left transverse sinuses thrombosis (Figure 1). Furthermore, there were venous infarction with haemorrhagic component and oedema in the left frontal, temporal, occipital and parietal lobes. In addition to continuation of anticoagulation, anticonvulsants were optimized to control convulsions. There was a reduction of seizure episodes over the subsequent five days and the patient's neurological deficit slowly normalized inthe next three weeks. She was then discharged home with mild hemiparesis and her subsequent outpatient visits showed no neurologic deterioration.

Bottom Line: Infection with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is associated with increased risk of cerebrovascular disease; however Cerebral Venous Sinus Thrombosis (CVST) is rarely associated with HIV-related cerebrovascular events.We describe two cases of HIV-positive patients who, at the same time, presented to our hospital with deep cerebral venous thrombosis and stroke.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Internal Medicine, University of Botswana, Gaborone, Botswana ; Department of Internal Medicine, Princess Marina Hospital, Gaborone, Botswana.

ABSTRACT
Infection with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is associated with increased risk of cerebrovascular disease; however Cerebral Venous Sinus Thrombosis (CVST) is rarely associated with HIV-related cerebrovascular events. We describe two cases of HIV-positive patients who, at the same time, presented to our hospital with deep cerebral venous thrombosis and stroke.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus