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Can short-term residential care for stroke rehabilitation help to reduce the institutionalization of stroke survivors?

Chau PH, Tang MW, Yeung F, Chan TW, Cheng JO, Woo J - Clin Interv Aging (2014)

Bottom Line: The intervention participants had a significantly lower 1-year institutionalization rate (15.8%) than the control group (25.8%).Furthermore, it had a significantly lower 1-year institutionalization rate.This type of service could be promoted to prevent institutionalization.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Nursing, University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, Special Administrative Region of the People's Republic of China.

ABSTRACT

Background: Stroke survivors may not be receiving optimal rehabilitation as a result of a shortage of hospital resources, and many of them are institutionalized. A rehabilitation program provided in a short-term residential care setting may help to fill the service gap.

Objectives: The primary objectives of this study were, first, to examine whether there were significant differences in terms of rehabilitation outcomes at 1 year after admission to the rehabilitation program (defined as baseline) between those using short-term residential care (intervention group) and those using usual geriatric day hospital care (control group), and, second, to investigate whether lower 1-year institutionalization rates were observed in the intervention group than in the control group.

Participants: 155 stroke survivors who completed at least the first follow-up at 4 months after baseline.

Intervention: The intervention group was stroke survivors using self-financed short-term residential care for stroke rehabilitation. The control group was stroke survivors using the usual care at a public geriatric day hospital.

Measurements: Assessments were conducted by trained research assistants using structured questionnaires at baseline, 4 months, and 1 year after baseline. The primary outcome measures included Modified Barthel Index score, Mini-Mental Status Examination score, and the institutionalization rate.

Results: Cognitive status (as measured by Mini-Mental Status Examination score) of patients in both groups could be maintained from 4 months to 1 year, whereas functional status (as measured by Modified Barthel Index score) of the patients could be further improved after 4 months up to 1 year. Meanwhile, insignificant between-group difference in rehabilitation outcomes was observed. The intervention participants had a significantly lower 1-year institutionalization rate (15.8%) than the control group (25.8%).

Conclusion: Short-term residential care for stroke rehabilitation promoted improvements in rehabilitation outcomes comparable with, if not better than, the usual care at geriatric day hospital. Furthermore, it had a significantly lower 1-year institutionalization rate. This type of service could be promoted to prevent institutionalization.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

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f1-cia-9-283: Study flow.

Mentions: At 1-year follow-up, 38 intervention participants and 89 control participants completed the study. Overall attrition rate (compared with baseline) was 32.4%. There were no significant differences in baseline characteristics and outcome measures between dropout participants and those who completed the 1-year follow-up. Figure 1 shows the study flow.


Can short-term residential care for stroke rehabilitation help to reduce the institutionalization of stroke survivors?

Chau PH, Tang MW, Yeung F, Chan TW, Cheng JO, Woo J - Clin Interv Aging (2014)

Study flow.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3926706&req=5

f1-cia-9-283: Study flow.
Mentions: At 1-year follow-up, 38 intervention participants and 89 control participants completed the study. Overall attrition rate (compared with baseline) was 32.4%. There were no significant differences in baseline characteristics and outcome measures between dropout participants and those who completed the 1-year follow-up. Figure 1 shows the study flow.

Bottom Line: The intervention participants had a significantly lower 1-year institutionalization rate (15.8%) than the control group (25.8%).Furthermore, it had a significantly lower 1-year institutionalization rate.This type of service could be promoted to prevent institutionalization.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Nursing, University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, Special Administrative Region of the People's Republic of China.

ABSTRACT

Background: Stroke survivors may not be receiving optimal rehabilitation as a result of a shortage of hospital resources, and many of them are institutionalized. A rehabilitation program provided in a short-term residential care setting may help to fill the service gap.

Objectives: The primary objectives of this study were, first, to examine whether there were significant differences in terms of rehabilitation outcomes at 1 year after admission to the rehabilitation program (defined as baseline) between those using short-term residential care (intervention group) and those using usual geriatric day hospital care (control group), and, second, to investigate whether lower 1-year institutionalization rates were observed in the intervention group than in the control group.

Participants: 155 stroke survivors who completed at least the first follow-up at 4 months after baseline.

Intervention: The intervention group was stroke survivors using self-financed short-term residential care for stroke rehabilitation. The control group was stroke survivors using the usual care at a public geriatric day hospital.

Measurements: Assessments were conducted by trained research assistants using structured questionnaires at baseline, 4 months, and 1 year after baseline. The primary outcome measures included Modified Barthel Index score, Mini-Mental Status Examination score, and the institutionalization rate.

Results: Cognitive status (as measured by Mini-Mental Status Examination score) of patients in both groups could be maintained from 4 months to 1 year, whereas functional status (as measured by Modified Barthel Index score) of the patients could be further improved after 4 months up to 1 year. Meanwhile, insignificant between-group difference in rehabilitation outcomes was observed. The intervention participants had a significantly lower 1-year institutionalization rate (15.8%) than the control group (25.8%).

Conclusion: Short-term residential care for stroke rehabilitation promoted improvements in rehabilitation outcomes comparable with, if not better than, the usual care at geriatric day hospital. Furthermore, it had a significantly lower 1-year institutionalization rate. This type of service could be promoted to prevent institutionalization.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus