Limits...
Evaluation of the Pericardium with CT and MR.

Czum JM, Silas AM, Althoen MC - ISRN Cardiol (2014)

Bottom Line: The pericardium plays an important role in optimizing cardiac motion and chamber pressures and serves as a barrier to pathology.In addition to pericardial anatomy and function, this review article covers a variety of pericardial conditions, with mention of potential pitfalls encountered during interpretation of diagnostic imaging.Normal and abnormal appearance of pericardium on CT and MR imaging is emphasized, including dynamic imaging correlates of pericardial pathophysiology.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, One Medical Center Drive, Lebanon, NH 03756, USA.

ABSTRACT
The pericardium plays an important role in optimizing cardiac motion and chamber pressures and serves as a barrier to pathology. In addition to pericardial anatomy and function, this review article covers a variety of pericardial conditions, with mention of potential pitfalls encountered during interpretation of diagnostic imaging. Normal and abnormal appearance of pericardium on CT and MR imaging is emphasized, including dynamic imaging correlates of pericardial pathophysiology.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Idiopathic/viral pericarditis. An 83-year-old male with history of coronary artery disease and hypertension presents to the emergency department with a 5-week history of fever and malaise. CECT performed for fever of unknown origin demonstrates pericardial enhancement and effusion (a–c), mediastinal lymphadenopathy (d), and a solid enhancing right renal mass (not shown). No cause for the patient's pericarditis was found. Aspiration yielded occasional lymphocytes. Culture was negative. Fine needle aspiration of a mediastinal lymph node showed reactive cells. Symptoms gradually resolved on aspirin 325 mg daily. The patient's incidentally discovered that renal cell carcinoma proved to be nonmetastatic by PET-CT which was performed later.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3926415&req=5

fig6: Idiopathic/viral pericarditis. An 83-year-old male with history of coronary artery disease and hypertension presents to the emergency department with a 5-week history of fever and malaise. CECT performed for fever of unknown origin demonstrates pericardial enhancement and effusion (a–c), mediastinal lymphadenopathy (d), and a solid enhancing right renal mass (not shown). No cause for the patient's pericarditis was found. Aspiration yielded occasional lymphocytes. Culture was negative. Fine needle aspiration of a mediastinal lymph node showed reactive cells. Symptoms gradually resolved on aspirin 325 mg daily. The patient's incidentally discovered that renal cell carcinoma proved to be nonmetastatic by PET-CT which was performed later.

Mentions: Nonsuppurative pericarditis may be acute, chronic or recurrent. In otherwise healthy patients, pericarditis is often ascribed to an undiagnosed viral infection (Figure 6). In patients who have received in excess of 40 Gy of radiation to the chest (most commonly in the treatment of breast cancer or lymphoma), a sterile pericarditis may develop several months after the initiation of treatment [25]. In patients with autoimmune or collagen vascular diseases, any of the serosal surfaces of the body may become inflamed, and the pericardium is no exception. When pericarditis is chronic or recurrent in these patients, fibrosis may develop, resulting in constrictive physiology. Findings on imaging include pericardial thickening, effusion, calcification, or a combination of these. MRI is often performed to differentiate pericarditis from myocarditis, but both may be present [30]. Although the clinical presentation of pericarditis and myocarditis may be similar, myocardial involvement portends a longer duration of illness and greater risk of cardiac dysfunction or death.


Evaluation of the Pericardium with CT and MR.

Czum JM, Silas AM, Althoen MC - ISRN Cardiol (2014)

Idiopathic/viral pericarditis. An 83-year-old male with history of coronary artery disease and hypertension presents to the emergency department with a 5-week history of fever and malaise. CECT performed for fever of unknown origin demonstrates pericardial enhancement and effusion (a–c), mediastinal lymphadenopathy (d), and a solid enhancing right renal mass (not shown). No cause for the patient's pericarditis was found. Aspiration yielded occasional lymphocytes. Culture was negative. Fine needle aspiration of a mediastinal lymph node showed reactive cells. Symptoms gradually resolved on aspirin 325 mg daily. The patient's incidentally discovered that renal cell carcinoma proved to be nonmetastatic by PET-CT which was performed later.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3926415&req=5

fig6: Idiopathic/viral pericarditis. An 83-year-old male with history of coronary artery disease and hypertension presents to the emergency department with a 5-week history of fever and malaise. CECT performed for fever of unknown origin demonstrates pericardial enhancement and effusion (a–c), mediastinal lymphadenopathy (d), and a solid enhancing right renal mass (not shown). No cause for the patient's pericarditis was found. Aspiration yielded occasional lymphocytes. Culture was negative. Fine needle aspiration of a mediastinal lymph node showed reactive cells. Symptoms gradually resolved on aspirin 325 mg daily. The patient's incidentally discovered that renal cell carcinoma proved to be nonmetastatic by PET-CT which was performed later.
Mentions: Nonsuppurative pericarditis may be acute, chronic or recurrent. In otherwise healthy patients, pericarditis is often ascribed to an undiagnosed viral infection (Figure 6). In patients who have received in excess of 40 Gy of radiation to the chest (most commonly in the treatment of breast cancer or lymphoma), a sterile pericarditis may develop several months after the initiation of treatment [25]. In patients with autoimmune or collagen vascular diseases, any of the serosal surfaces of the body may become inflamed, and the pericardium is no exception. When pericarditis is chronic or recurrent in these patients, fibrosis may develop, resulting in constrictive physiology. Findings on imaging include pericardial thickening, effusion, calcification, or a combination of these. MRI is often performed to differentiate pericarditis from myocarditis, but both may be present [30]. Although the clinical presentation of pericarditis and myocarditis may be similar, myocardial involvement portends a longer duration of illness and greater risk of cardiac dysfunction or death.

Bottom Line: The pericardium plays an important role in optimizing cardiac motion and chamber pressures and serves as a barrier to pathology.In addition to pericardial anatomy and function, this review article covers a variety of pericardial conditions, with mention of potential pitfalls encountered during interpretation of diagnostic imaging.Normal and abnormal appearance of pericardium on CT and MR imaging is emphasized, including dynamic imaging correlates of pericardial pathophysiology.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, One Medical Center Drive, Lebanon, NH 03756, USA.

ABSTRACT
The pericardium plays an important role in optimizing cardiac motion and chamber pressures and serves as a barrier to pathology. In addition to pericardial anatomy and function, this review article covers a variety of pericardial conditions, with mention of potential pitfalls encountered during interpretation of diagnostic imaging. Normal and abnormal appearance of pericardium on CT and MR imaging is emphasized, including dynamic imaging correlates of pericardial pathophysiology.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus