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Rotational dynamics of optically trapped human spermatozoa.

Subramani E, Basu H, Thangaraju S, Dandekar S, Mathur D, Chaudhury K - ScientificWorldJournal (2014)

Bottom Line: Optical trapping is a laser-based method for probing the physiological and mechanical properties of cells in a noninvasive manner.An integrated optical system with near-infrared laser beam has been used to analyze rotational dynamics of live sperm cells from oligozoospermic and asthenozoospermic cases and compared with controls.The linear, translational motion of the sperm is converted into rotational motion on being optically trapped, without causing any adverse effect on spermatozoa.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Medical Science and Technology, Indian Institute of Technology Kharagpur, Kharagpur, West Bengal 721 302, India.

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Optical trapping is a laser-based method for probing the physiological and mechanical properties of cells in a noninvasive manner. As sperm motility is an important criterion for assessing the male fertility potential, this technique is used to study sperm cell motility behavior and rotational dynamics.

Methods and patients: An integrated optical system with near-infrared laser beam has been used to analyze rotational dynamics of live sperm cells from oligozoospermic and asthenozoospermic cases and compared with controls.

Results: The linear, translational motion of the sperm is converted into rotational motion on being optically trapped, without causing any adverse effect on spermatozoa. The rotational speed of sperm cells from infertile men is observed to be significantly less as compared to controls.

Conclusions: Distinguishing normal and abnormal sperm cells on the basis of beat frequency above 5.6 Hz may be an important step in modern reproductive biology to sort and select good quality spermatozoa. The application of laser-assisted technique in biology has the potential to be a valuable tool for assessment of sperm fertilization capacity for improving assisted reproductive technology.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

A schematic diagram of optical tweezer set-up used to study rotational dynamics of live spermatozoa.
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fig1: A schematic diagram of optical tweezer set-up used to study rotational dynamics of live spermatozoa.

Mentions: The optical trap set-up that was used in the present studies has been extensively described earlier [29] and is schematically represented in Figure 1. Briefly, a continuous wave, 1064 laser, beam from a diode-pumped Nd : YVO4 laser is coupled to a fluorescence-equipped inverted microscope (NIKON TE 2000U). To achieve trapping, the laser was focused through a 100X microscope objective with numerical aperture 1.3. To avoid possible damage to the trapped sperm cells, the power of the laser incident on the sperm samples was limited to be less than 20 mW. The dynamics of the live sperm cells under the trap were visualized and captured in real-time using a 25-frame/second CCD camera interfaced with a computer. Such videos were then analyzed frame by frame by Image J software.


Rotational dynamics of optically trapped human spermatozoa.

Subramani E, Basu H, Thangaraju S, Dandekar S, Mathur D, Chaudhury K - ScientificWorldJournal (2014)

A schematic diagram of optical tweezer set-up used to study rotational dynamics of live spermatozoa.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3926395&req=5

fig1: A schematic diagram of optical tweezer set-up used to study rotational dynamics of live spermatozoa.
Mentions: The optical trap set-up that was used in the present studies has been extensively described earlier [29] and is schematically represented in Figure 1. Briefly, a continuous wave, 1064 laser, beam from a diode-pumped Nd : YVO4 laser is coupled to a fluorescence-equipped inverted microscope (NIKON TE 2000U). To achieve trapping, the laser was focused through a 100X microscope objective with numerical aperture 1.3. To avoid possible damage to the trapped sperm cells, the power of the laser incident on the sperm samples was limited to be less than 20 mW. The dynamics of the live sperm cells under the trap were visualized and captured in real-time using a 25-frame/second CCD camera interfaced with a computer. Such videos were then analyzed frame by frame by Image J software.

Bottom Line: Optical trapping is a laser-based method for probing the physiological and mechanical properties of cells in a noninvasive manner.An integrated optical system with near-infrared laser beam has been used to analyze rotational dynamics of live sperm cells from oligozoospermic and asthenozoospermic cases and compared with controls.The linear, translational motion of the sperm is converted into rotational motion on being optically trapped, without causing any adverse effect on spermatozoa.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Medical Science and Technology, Indian Institute of Technology Kharagpur, Kharagpur, West Bengal 721 302, India.

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Optical trapping is a laser-based method for probing the physiological and mechanical properties of cells in a noninvasive manner. As sperm motility is an important criterion for assessing the male fertility potential, this technique is used to study sperm cell motility behavior and rotational dynamics.

Methods and patients: An integrated optical system with near-infrared laser beam has been used to analyze rotational dynamics of live sperm cells from oligozoospermic and asthenozoospermic cases and compared with controls.

Results: The linear, translational motion of the sperm is converted into rotational motion on being optically trapped, without causing any adverse effect on spermatozoa. The rotational speed of sperm cells from infertile men is observed to be significantly less as compared to controls.

Conclusions: Distinguishing normal and abnormal sperm cells on the basis of beat frequency above 5.6 Hz may be an important step in modern reproductive biology to sort and select good quality spermatozoa. The application of laser-assisted technique in biology has the potential to be a valuable tool for assessment of sperm fertilization capacity for improving assisted reproductive technology.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus