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A systematic review of interactive multimedia interventions to promote children's communication with health professionals: implications for communicating with overweight children.

Raaff C, Glazebrook C, Wharrad H - BMC Med Inform Decis Mak (2014)

Bottom Line: Of particular interest were the effects of these MIs on child engagement and participation in treatment, and the subsequent effect on health-related treatment outcomes.Data describing study characteristics and intervention effects on communication, satisfaction, knowledge acquisition, changes in self-efficacy, healthcare utilisation, and health outcomes were extracted and summarised using qualitative and quantitative methods.In spite of concerns over the quality of some studies and small study populations, MIs were found useful in educating children about their health, and they demonstrated potential to improve children's health-related self-efficacy, which could make them more able partners in face-to-face communications with health professionals.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Medicine, Division of Psychiatry and Applied Psychology, Institute of Mental Health, University of Nottingham, Jubilee Campus, Nottingham, UK. mcxcar@nottingham.ac.uk.

ABSTRACT

Background: Interactive multimedia is an emerging technology that is being used to facilitate interactions between patients and health professionals. The purpose of this review was to identify and evaluate the impact of multimedia interventions (MIs), delivered in the context of paediatric healthcare, in order to inform the development of a MI to promote the communication of dietetic messages with overweight preadolescent children. Of particular interest were the effects of these MIs on child engagement and participation in treatment, and the subsequent effect on health-related treatment outcomes.

Methods: An extensive search of 12 bibliographic databases was conducted in April 2012. Studies were included if: one or more child-participant was 7 to 11-years-of-age; a MI was used to improve health-related behaviour; child-participants were diagnosed with a health condition and were receiving treatment for that condition at the time of the study. Data describing study characteristics and intervention effects on communication, satisfaction, knowledge acquisition, changes in self-efficacy, healthcare utilisation, and health outcomes were extracted and summarised using qualitative and quantitative methods.

Results: A total of 14 controlled trials, published between 1997 and 2006 met the selection criteria. Several MIs had the capacity to facilitate engagement between the child and a clinician, but only one sought to utilise the MI to improve communication between the child and health professional. In spite of concerns over the quality of some studies and small study populations, MIs were found useful in educating children about their health, and they demonstrated potential to improve children's health-related self-efficacy, which could make them more able partners in face-to-face communications with health professionals.

Conclusions: The findings of this review suggest that MIs have the capacity to support preadolescent child-clinician communication, but further research in this field is needed. Particular attention should be given to designing appropriate MIs that are clinically relevant.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Age range and mean age of participants.
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Figure 4: Age range and mean age of participants.

Mentions: One of the more extreme examples of not achieving this quality indicator was found in an asthma study by Krishna, et al.[7], that included infants, toddlers, preadolescents, and teenagers. Children below the age of seven were deemed too young for the Interactive Multimedia Program for Asthma Control (IMPACT), their parents effectively becoming the study participants and using the MI on the child’s behalf. Those aged between 7 and 17-years used the same MI under similar conditions. It is unlikely that a single MI would be appropriate, or indeed engaging, for such a wide age range. Disparities may include; visual presentation and design, use of language and text, navigation, and content presentation [59,64]. Aspects of a MI that appeal to the child may not necessarily hold the attention of the parent. For example:which children found interfered with the game aspects of the MI. Several others [6,9,65-67,73] chose to recruit children of significant age differences (Figure 4); 9 to 12-years older than the youngest in the same study. Of these, Bartholomew, et al.[67] and Hazzard, et al.[65] took steps to account for the pedagogical needs of the more mature children by introducing alternative coaching character roles and more advanced levels within the MI, respectively. Dragone, et al.[69] demonstrated good quality MI design in their multi-levelled Kidz with Leukemia: A Space Adventure, ensuring that the differing presentation and information needs of the younger (4 to 6-year-olds) and older (7 to 11-year-old) children were accommodated through extensive piloting.


A systematic review of interactive multimedia interventions to promote children's communication with health professionals: implications for communicating with overweight children.

Raaff C, Glazebrook C, Wharrad H - BMC Med Inform Decis Mak (2014)

Age range and mean age of participants.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3926331&req=5

Figure 4: Age range and mean age of participants.
Mentions: One of the more extreme examples of not achieving this quality indicator was found in an asthma study by Krishna, et al.[7], that included infants, toddlers, preadolescents, and teenagers. Children below the age of seven were deemed too young for the Interactive Multimedia Program for Asthma Control (IMPACT), their parents effectively becoming the study participants and using the MI on the child’s behalf. Those aged between 7 and 17-years used the same MI under similar conditions. It is unlikely that a single MI would be appropriate, or indeed engaging, for such a wide age range. Disparities may include; visual presentation and design, use of language and text, navigation, and content presentation [59,64]. Aspects of a MI that appeal to the child may not necessarily hold the attention of the parent. For example:which children found interfered with the game aspects of the MI. Several others [6,9,65-67,73] chose to recruit children of significant age differences (Figure 4); 9 to 12-years older than the youngest in the same study. Of these, Bartholomew, et al.[67] and Hazzard, et al.[65] took steps to account for the pedagogical needs of the more mature children by introducing alternative coaching character roles and more advanced levels within the MI, respectively. Dragone, et al.[69] demonstrated good quality MI design in their multi-levelled Kidz with Leukemia: A Space Adventure, ensuring that the differing presentation and information needs of the younger (4 to 6-year-olds) and older (7 to 11-year-old) children were accommodated through extensive piloting.

Bottom Line: Of particular interest were the effects of these MIs on child engagement and participation in treatment, and the subsequent effect on health-related treatment outcomes.Data describing study characteristics and intervention effects on communication, satisfaction, knowledge acquisition, changes in self-efficacy, healthcare utilisation, and health outcomes were extracted and summarised using qualitative and quantitative methods.In spite of concerns over the quality of some studies and small study populations, MIs were found useful in educating children about their health, and they demonstrated potential to improve children's health-related self-efficacy, which could make them more able partners in face-to-face communications with health professionals.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Medicine, Division of Psychiatry and Applied Psychology, Institute of Mental Health, University of Nottingham, Jubilee Campus, Nottingham, UK. mcxcar@nottingham.ac.uk.

ABSTRACT

Background: Interactive multimedia is an emerging technology that is being used to facilitate interactions between patients and health professionals. The purpose of this review was to identify and evaluate the impact of multimedia interventions (MIs), delivered in the context of paediatric healthcare, in order to inform the development of a MI to promote the communication of dietetic messages with overweight preadolescent children. Of particular interest were the effects of these MIs on child engagement and participation in treatment, and the subsequent effect on health-related treatment outcomes.

Methods: An extensive search of 12 bibliographic databases was conducted in April 2012. Studies were included if: one or more child-participant was 7 to 11-years-of-age; a MI was used to improve health-related behaviour; child-participants were diagnosed with a health condition and were receiving treatment for that condition at the time of the study. Data describing study characteristics and intervention effects on communication, satisfaction, knowledge acquisition, changes in self-efficacy, healthcare utilisation, and health outcomes were extracted and summarised using qualitative and quantitative methods.

Results: A total of 14 controlled trials, published between 1997 and 2006 met the selection criteria. Several MIs had the capacity to facilitate engagement between the child and a clinician, but only one sought to utilise the MI to improve communication between the child and health professional. In spite of concerns over the quality of some studies and small study populations, MIs were found useful in educating children about their health, and they demonstrated potential to improve children's health-related self-efficacy, which could make them more able partners in face-to-face communications with health professionals.

Conclusions: The findings of this review suggest that MIs have the capacity to support preadolescent child-clinician communication, but further research in this field is needed. Particular attention should be given to designing appropriate MIs that are clinically relevant.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus