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Is bone transplantation the gold standard for repair of alveolar bone defects?

Raposo-Amaral CE, Bueno DF, Almeida AB, Jorgetti V, Costa CC, Gouveia CH, Vulcano LC, Fanganiello RD, Passos-Bueno MR, Alonso N - J Tissue Eng (2014)

Bottom Line: Groups 2-5 were compared to Group 1, the reference group.Groups 4 and 5 showed 51.48% ± 11.7% (p = 0.30) and 61.80% ± 2.14% (p = 0.88) of bone in the defect, respectively.Animals whose bone defects were repaired with α-tricalcium phosphate and mesenchymal stem cells presented the highest bone volume filling the defects; both were not statistically different from autogenous bone.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Departamento de Cirurgia Plástica e Queimaduras, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade de São Paulo (USP), São Paulo, Brazil.

ABSTRACT
New strategies to fulfill craniofacial bone defects have gained attention in recent years due to the morbidity of autologous bone graft harvesting. We aimed to evaluate the in vivo efficacy of bone tissue engineering strategy using mesenchymal stem cells associated with two matrices (bovine bone mineral and α-tricalcium phosphate), compared to an autologous bone transfer. A total of 28 adult, male, non-immunosuppressed Wistar rats underwent a critical-sized osseous defect of 5 mm diameter in the alveolar region. Animals were divided into five groups. Group 1 (n = 7) defects were repaired with autogenous bone grafts; Group 2 (n = 5) defects were repaired with bovine bone mineral free of cells; Group 3 (n = 5) defects were repaired with bovine bone mineral loaded with mesenchymal stem cells; Group 4 (n = 5) defects were repaired with α-tricalcium phosphate free of cells; and Group 5 (n = 6) defects were repaired with α-tricalcium phosphate loaded with mesenchymal stem cells. Groups 2-5 were compared to Group 1, the reference group. Healing response was evaluated by histomorphometry and computerized tomography. Histomorphometrically, Group 1 showed 60.27% ± 16.13% of bone in the defect. Groups 2 and 3 showed 23.02% ± 8.6% (p = 0.01) and 38.35% ± 19.59% (p = 0.06) of bone in the defect, respectively. Groups 4 and 5 showed 51.48% ± 11.7% (p = 0.30) and 61.80% ± 2.14% (p = 0.88) of bone in the defect, respectively. Animals whose bone defects were repaired with α-tricalcium phosphate and mesenchymal stem cells presented the highest bone volume filling the defects; both were not statistically different from autogenous bone.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Reformatted computerized tomography imaging showing one example of two modalities of treatment at 8 weeks after surgery using α-TCP free of cells (first row) and α-TCP loaded with mesenchymal stem cells (second row). The blue arrows show the alveolar osseous defect repaired with the different modalities.TCP: tricalcium phosphate; MSC: mesenchymal stem cell.
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fig4-2041731413519352: Reformatted computerized tomography imaging showing one example of two modalities of treatment at 8 weeks after surgery using α-TCP free of cells (first row) and α-TCP loaded with mesenchymal stem cells (second row). The blue arrows show the alveolar osseous defect repaired with the different modalities.TCP: tricalcium phosphate; MSC: mesenchymal stem cell.

Mentions: The mean scores for the five groups rated by the two observers was 2 ± 0 for Group 1, 1.4 ± 0.52 for Group 2, 1.5±0.53 for Group 3, 1.6 ± 0.52 for Group 4, and 1.8 ± 0.42 for Group 5 (Figures 2–4). The comparison of Group 1 with Group 2 (p = 0.051), Group 3 (p = 0.053), Group 4 (p = 0.134) and Group 5 (p = 0.317) did not statistically differ. The observers scored an identical value for all groups, except for Group 3, which presented interobserver variability of ±1 (k = 0.911) (Table 1).


Is bone transplantation the gold standard for repair of alveolar bone defects?

Raposo-Amaral CE, Bueno DF, Almeida AB, Jorgetti V, Costa CC, Gouveia CH, Vulcano LC, Fanganiello RD, Passos-Bueno MR, Alonso N - J Tissue Eng (2014)

Reformatted computerized tomography imaging showing one example of two modalities of treatment at 8 weeks after surgery using α-TCP free of cells (first row) and α-TCP loaded with mesenchymal stem cells (second row). The blue arrows show the alveolar osseous defect repaired with the different modalities.TCP: tricalcium phosphate; MSC: mesenchymal stem cell.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3924878&req=5

fig4-2041731413519352: Reformatted computerized tomography imaging showing one example of two modalities of treatment at 8 weeks after surgery using α-TCP free of cells (first row) and α-TCP loaded with mesenchymal stem cells (second row). The blue arrows show the alveolar osseous defect repaired with the different modalities.TCP: tricalcium phosphate; MSC: mesenchymal stem cell.
Mentions: The mean scores for the five groups rated by the two observers was 2 ± 0 for Group 1, 1.4 ± 0.52 for Group 2, 1.5±0.53 for Group 3, 1.6 ± 0.52 for Group 4, and 1.8 ± 0.42 for Group 5 (Figures 2–4). The comparison of Group 1 with Group 2 (p = 0.051), Group 3 (p = 0.053), Group 4 (p = 0.134) and Group 5 (p = 0.317) did not statistically differ. The observers scored an identical value for all groups, except for Group 3, which presented interobserver variability of ±1 (k = 0.911) (Table 1).

Bottom Line: Groups 2-5 were compared to Group 1, the reference group.Groups 4 and 5 showed 51.48% ± 11.7% (p = 0.30) and 61.80% ± 2.14% (p = 0.88) of bone in the defect, respectively.Animals whose bone defects were repaired with α-tricalcium phosphate and mesenchymal stem cells presented the highest bone volume filling the defects; both were not statistically different from autogenous bone.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Departamento de Cirurgia Plástica e Queimaduras, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade de São Paulo (USP), São Paulo, Brazil.

ABSTRACT
New strategies to fulfill craniofacial bone defects have gained attention in recent years due to the morbidity of autologous bone graft harvesting. We aimed to evaluate the in vivo efficacy of bone tissue engineering strategy using mesenchymal stem cells associated with two matrices (bovine bone mineral and α-tricalcium phosphate), compared to an autologous bone transfer. A total of 28 adult, male, non-immunosuppressed Wistar rats underwent a critical-sized osseous defect of 5 mm diameter in the alveolar region. Animals were divided into five groups. Group 1 (n = 7) defects were repaired with autogenous bone grafts; Group 2 (n = 5) defects were repaired with bovine bone mineral free of cells; Group 3 (n = 5) defects were repaired with bovine bone mineral loaded with mesenchymal stem cells; Group 4 (n = 5) defects were repaired with α-tricalcium phosphate free of cells; and Group 5 (n = 6) defects were repaired with α-tricalcium phosphate loaded with mesenchymal stem cells. Groups 2-5 were compared to Group 1, the reference group. Healing response was evaluated by histomorphometry and computerized tomography. Histomorphometrically, Group 1 showed 60.27% ± 16.13% of bone in the defect. Groups 2 and 3 showed 23.02% ± 8.6% (p = 0.01) and 38.35% ± 19.59% (p = 0.06) of bone in the defect, respectively. Groups 4 and 5 showed 51.48% ± 11.7% (p = 0.30) and 61.80% ± 2.14% (p = 0.88) of bone in the defect, respectively. Animals whose bone defects were repaired with α-tricalcium phosphate and mesenchymal stem cells presented the highest bone volume filling the defects; both were not statistically different from autogenous bone.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus