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siRNA Treatment: "A Sword-in-the-Stone" for Acute Brain Injuries.

Fukuda AM, Badaut J - Genes (Basel) (2013)

Bottom Line: Ever since the discovery of small interfering ribonucleic acid (siRNA) a little over a decade ago, it has been highly sought after for its potential as a therapeutic agent for many diseases.First, we will give a brief and basic overview of the principle of RNA interference as an effective mechanism to decrease specific protein expression.Then, we will review recent in vivo studies describing siRNA research experiments/treatment options for acute brain diseases.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Physiology, Loma Linda University School of Medicine, Loma Linda, CA 92354, USA. afukuda@llu.edu.

ABSTRACT
Ever since the discovery of small interfering ribonucleic acid (siRNA) a little over a decade ago, it has been highly sought after for its potential as a therapeutic agent for many diseases. In this review, we discuss the promising possibility of siRNA to be used as a drug to treat acute brain injuries such as stroke and traumatic brain injury. First, we will give a brief and basic overview of the principle of RNA interference as an effective mechanism to decrease specific protein expression. Then, we will review recent in vivo studies describing siRNA research experiments/treatment options for acute brain diseases. Lastly, we will discuss the future of siRNA as a clinical therapeutic strategy against brain diseases and injuries, while addressing the current obstacles to effective brain delivery.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Molecular pathway for siRNA processing.
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genes-04-00435-f001: Molecular pathway for siRNA processing.

Mentions: RNA interference is an endogenous mechanism present across phylogenetic groups, and has been described in humans, plants and animals. Generally, RNAs are best known for their role in gene expression and protein synthesis from DNA, such as messenger RNA (mRNA) and transfer RNA (tRNA). Although a single-stranded molecule in many of its biological functions, RNA can form intra-strand double helixes upon itself, which may trigger post-transcriptional gene silencing, also known as RNA interference. During interference, microRNA (miRNA) and/or siRNA molecules can inhibit gene expression, typically by causing the destruction of specific mRNAs. Dr. Fire and Dr. Mello received the Nobel Prize for the ground-breaking discovery of this RNA interference mechanism described in C. elegans [4], with later studies devoted to the discovery of specific molecular mechanisms of RNA interference processes [5]. Thus, only a very brief explanation of the siRNA pathway will be provided here (Figure 1), since our review will be focused on the possible use of siRNA in acute brain injuries.


siRNA Treatment: "A Sword-in-the-Stone" for Acute Brain Injuries.

Fukuda AM, Badaut J - Genes (Basel) (2013)

Molecular pathway for siRNA processing.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3924829&req=5

genes-04-00435-f001: Molecular pathway for siRNA processing.
Mentions: RNA interference is an endogenous mechanism present across phylogenetic groups, and has been described in humans, plants and animals. Generally, RNAs are best known for their role in gene expression and protein synthesis from DNA, such as messenger RNA (mRNA) and transfer RNA (tRNA). Although a single-stranded molecule in many of its biological functions, RNA can form intra-strand double helixes upon itself, which may trigger post-transcriptional gene silencing, also known as RNA interference. During interference, microRNA (miRNA) and/or siRNA molecules can inhibit gene expression, typically by causing the destruction of specific mRNAs. Dr. Fire and Dr. Mello received the Nobel Prize for the ground-breaking discovery of this RNA interference mechanism described in C. elegans [4], with later studies devoted to the discovery of specific molecular mechanisms of RNA interference processes [5]. Thus, only a very brief explanation of the siRNA pathway will be provided here (Figure 1), since our review will be focused on the possible use of siRNA in acute brain injuries.

Bottom Line: Ever since the discovery of small interfering ribonucleic acid (siRNA) a little over a decade ago, it has been highly sought after for its potential as a therapeutic agent for many diseases.First, we will give a brief and basic overview of the principle of RNA interference as an effective mechanism to decrease specific protein expression.Then, we will review recent in vivo studies describing siRNA research experiments/treatment options for acute brain diseases.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Physiology, Loma Linda University School of Medicine, Loma Linda, CA 92354, USA. afukuda@llu.edu.

ABSTRACT
Ever since the discovery of small interfering ribonucleic acid (siRNA) a little over a decade ago, it has been highly sought after for its potential as a therapeutic agent for many diseases. In this review, we discuss the promising possibility of siRNA to be used as a drug to treat acute brain injuries such as stroke and traumatic brain injury. First, we will give a brief and basic overview of the principle of RNA interference as an effective mechanism to decrease specific protein expression. Then, we will review recent in vivo studies describing siRNA research experiments/treatment options for acute brain diseases. Lastly, we will discuss the future of siRNA as a clinical therapeutic strategy against brain diseases and injuries, while addressing the current obstacles to effective brain delivery.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus