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The Rate and Tract Length of Gene Conversion between Duplicated Genes.

Mansai SP, Kado T, Innan H - Genes (Basel) (2011)

Bottom Line: To understand the rate and tract length of gene conversion, there are two major approaches.One is based on mutation-accumulation experiments, and the other uses natural DNA sequence variation.In this review, we overview the two major approaches and discuss their advantages and disadvantages.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Graduate University for Advanced Studies, Hayama, Kanagawa 240-0193, Japan. sayaka@soken.ac.jp.

ABSTRACT
Interlocus gene conversion occurs such that a certain length of DNA fragment is non-reciprocally transferred (copied and pasted) between paralogous regions. To understand the rate and tract length of gene conversion, there are two major approaches. One is based on mutation-accumulation experiments, and the other uses natural DNA sequence variation. In this review, we overview the two major approaches and discuss their advantages and disadvantages. In addition, to demonstrate the importance of statistical analysis of empirical and evolutionary data for estimating tract length, we apply a maximum likelihood method to several data sets.

No MeSH data available.


Application of the ML method to the four data sets in Table 2. See the legend of Figure 3 for details.
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f5-genes-02-00313: Application of the ML method to the four data sets in Table 2. See the legend of Figure 3 for details.

Mentions: In Table 2, we summarize four genotyping data sets from human disease genes, for which our assumption of independent gene conversion should likely hold because the frequencies of patients are extremely low. The ML function (8) was applied to these four data sets and the results are summarized in Figure 5. The ML estimates of T are quite similar to those of the empirical approach for yeast and rodent.


The Rate and Tract Length of Gene Conversion between Duplicated Genes.

Mansai SP, Kado T, Innan H - Genes (Basel) (2011)

Application of the ML method to the four data sets in Table 2. See the legend of Figure 3 for details.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3924818&req=5

f5-genes-02-00313: Application of the ML method to the four data sets in Table 2. See the legend of Figure 3 for details.
Mentions: In Table 2, we summarize four genotyping data sets from human disease genes, for which our assumption of independent gene conversion should likely hold because the frequencies of patients are extremely low. The ML function (8) was applied to these four data sets and the results are summarized in Figure 5. The ML estimates of T are quite similar to those of the empirical approach for yeast and rodent.

Bottom Line: To understand the rate and tract length of gene conversion, there are two major approaches.One is based on mutation-accumulation experiments, and the other uses natural DNA sequence variation.In this review, we overview the two major approaches and discuss their advantages and disadvantages.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Graduate University for Advanced Studies, Hayama, Kanagawa 240-0193, Japan. sayaka@soken.ac.jp.

ABSTRACT
Interlocus gene conversion occurs such that a certain length of DNA fragment is non-reciprocally transferred (copied and pasted) between paralogous regions. To understand the rate and tract length of gene conversion, there are two major approaches. One is based on mutation-accumulation experiments, and the other uses natural DNA sequence variation. In this review, we overview the two major approaches and discuss their advantages and disadvantages. In addition, to demonstrate the importance of statistical analysis of empirical and evolutionary data for estimating tract length, we apply a maximum likelihood method to several data sets.

No MeSH data available.