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Estimating cyanobacteria community dynamics and its relationship with environmental factors.

Luo W, Chen H, Lei A, Lu J, Hu Z - Int J Environ Res Public Health (2014)

Bottom Line: The cyanobacteria population peaked in August in both reservoirs, with cell abundances of 3.78 × 10(8) cells L(-1) and 1.92 × 10(8) cells L(-1) in the Tiegang and Shiyan reservoirs, respectively.Canonical Correspondence Analysis (CCA) was applied to further investigate the correlation between cyanobacteria community dynamics and environmental factors.The result indicated that the cyanobacteria community dynamics was mostly correlated with pH, temperature and total nitrogen.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Shenzhen Key Laboratory of Marine Bioresource and Eco-environmental Science, Shenzhen Engineering Laboratory of Marine Algal Biotechnology, College of Life Science, Shenzhen University, Shenzhen 518060, China. luowh127@gmail.com.

ABSTRACT
The cyanobacteria community dynamics in two eutrophic freshwater bodies (Tiegang Reservoir and Shiyan Reservoir) was studied with both a traditional microscopic counting method and a PCR-DGGE genotyping method. Results showed that cyanobacterium Phormidium tenue was the predominant species; twenty-six cyanobacteria species were identified in water samples collected from the two reservoirs, among which fourteen were identified with the morphological method and sixteen with the PCR-DGGE method. The cyanobacteria community composition analysis showed a seasonal fluctuation from July to December. The cyanobacteria population peaked in August in both reservoirs, with cell abundances of 3.78 × 10(8) cells L(-1) and 1.92 × 10(8) cells L(-1) in the Tiegang and Shiyan reservoirs, respectively. Canonical Correspondence Analysis (CCA) was applied to further investigate the correlation between cyanobacteria community dynamics and environmental factors. The result indicated that the cyanobacteria community dynamics was mostly correlated with pH, temperature and total nitrogen. This study demonstrated that data obtained from PCR-DGGE combined with a traditional morphological method could reflect cyanobacteria community dynamics and its correlation with environmental factors in eutrophic freshwater bodies.

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Larger PCR-DGGE fingerprint map for sequencing. Lanes 1-6: samples from July to December in Tiegang Reservoir; Lanes 7-12: samples from July to December in Shiyan Reservoir.
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ijerph-11-01141-f006: Larger PCR-DGGE fingerprint map for sequencing. Lanes 1-6: samples from July to December in Tiegang Reservoir; Lanes 7-12: samples from July to December in Shiyan Reservoir.

Mentions: Figure 2 shows PCR-DGGE results of water samples collected from Tiegang and Shiyan Reservoirs from July to December (more details are shown in Figure A1 and Table A1 and Table A2 in Appendix). As summarized in Table 3 (e-value of each comparison was under 0.001), 16 cyanobacteria genotypes corresponding to 16 species were identified in each reservoir, including Microcystis, Phormidium, Synechocystis, Cylindrospermopsis, Spirulina, Arthrospira, Raphidiopsis, Lynghya and Anabeana. For these 16 species, each species had one specific band, except for Cylindrospermopsis raciborskii (bands 11 and 13) (Table 3). The brightness of the band was used as an indicator of cyanobacteria density. For example, band 16 in Figure 2 was very bright, and the corresponding Phormidium sp. was also shown to be dominant genera under microscope investigation (Table 2). However, it should be noted that the PCR step could favor the amplification of particular DNA segments, which may cause an underestimation of certain strains of bacteria. In the current study, the comparison of dominant species between PCR-DGGE and microscopic analyses seemed to be compatible.


Estimating cyanobacteria community dynamics and its relationship with environmental factors.

Luo W, Chen H, Lei A, Lu J, Hu Z - Int J Environ Res Public Health (2014)

Larger PCR-DGGE fingerprint map for sequencing. Lanes 1-6: samples from July to December in Tiegang Reservoir; Lanes 7-12: samples from July to December in Shiyan Reservoir.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3924496&req=5

ijerph-11-01141-f006: Larger PCR-DGGE fingerprint map for sequencing. Lanes 1-6: samples from July to December in Tiegang Reservoir; Lanes 7-12: samples from July to December in Shiyan Reservoir.
Mentions: Figure 2 shows PCR-DGGE results of water samples collected from Tiegang and Shiyan Reservoirs from July to December (more details are shown in Figure A1 and Table A1 and Table A2 in Appendix). As summarized in Table 3 (e-value of each comparison was under 0.001), 16 cyanobacteria genotypes corresponding to 16 species were identified in each reservoir, including Microcystis, Phormidium, Synechocystis, Cylindrospermopsis, Spirulina, Arthrospira, Raphidiopsis, Lynghya and Anabeana. For these 16 species, each species had one specific band, except for Cylindrospermopsis raciborskii (bands 11 and 13) (Table 3). The brightness of the band was used as an indicator of cyanobacteria density. For example, band 16 in Figure 2 was very bright, and the corresponding Phormidium sp. was also shown to be dominant genera under microscope investigation (Table 2). However, it should be noted that the PCR step could favor the amplification of particular DNA segments, which may cause an underestimation of certain strains of bacteria. In the current study, the comparison of dominant species between PCR-DGGE and microscopic analyses seemed to be compatible.

Bottom Line: The cyanobacteria population peaked in August in both reservoirs, with cell abundances of 3.78 × 10(8) cells L(-1) and 1.92 × 10(8) cells L(-1) in the Tiegang and Shiyan reservoirs, respectively.Canonical Correspondence Analysis (CCA) was applied to further investigate the correlation between cyanobacteria community dynamics and environmental factors.The result indicated that the cyanobacteria community dynamics was mostly correlated with pH, temperature and total nitrogen.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Shenzhen Key Laboratory of Marine Bioresource and Eco-environmental Science, Shenzhen Engineering Laboratory of Marine Algal Biotechnology, College of Life Science, Shenzhen University, Shenzhen 518060, China. luowh127@gmail.com.

ABSTRACT
The cyanobacteria community dynamics in two eutrophic freshwater bodies (Tiegang Reservoir and Shiyan Reservoir) was studied with both a traditional microscopic counting method and a PCR-DGGE genotyping method. Results showed that cyanobacterium Phormidium tenue was the predominant species; twenty-six cyanobacteria species were identified in water samples collected from the two reservoirs, among which fourteen were identified with the morphological method and sixteen with the PCR-DGGE method. The cyanobacteria community composition analysis showed a seasonal fluctuation from July to December. The cyanobacteria population peaked in August in both reservoirs, with cell abundances of 3.78 × 10(8) cells L(-1) and 1.92 × 10(8) cells L(-1) in the Tiegang and Shiyan reservoirs, respectively. Canonical Correspondence Analysis (CCA) was applied to further investigate the correlation between cyanobacteria community dynamics and environmental factors. The result indicated that the cyanobacteria community dynamics was mostly correlated with pH, temperature and total nitrogen. This study demonstrated that data obtained from PCR-DGGE combined with a traditional morphological method could reflect cyanobacteria community dynamics and its correlation with environmental factors in eutrophic freshwater bodies.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus