Limits...
The portrayal of natural environment in the evolution of the ecological public health paradigm.

Coutts C, Forkink A, Weiner J - Int J Environ Res Public Health (2014)

Bottom Line: The natural environment has long been recognized as essential to supporting life, health, and wellbeing.Six models are presented here to demonstrate this evolution, each model reflecting an increasingly ecological appreciation for the fundamental role of the natural environment in supporting human health.We conclude that after decades of public health's acceptance of the ecological paradigm, we are only now beginning to assemble knowledge of sophisticated ecological interdependencies and apply this knowledge to the conceptualization and study of the relationship between the natural environment and the determinants of human health.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Urban and Regional Planning, Center for Demography and Population Health, Florida State University, 113 Collegiate Way, Tallahassee, FL 32306, USA. ccoutts@fsu.edu.

ABSTRACT
This paper explores the conceptualization of the natural environment in an evolving ecological public health paradigm. The natural environment has long been recognized as essential to supporting life, health, and wellbeing. Our understanding of the relationship between the natural environment and health has steadily evolved from one of an undynamic environment to a more sophisticated understanding of ecological interactions.  This evolution is reflected in a number of ecological public health models which demonstrate the many external and overlapping determinants of human health. Six models are presented here to demonstrate this evolution, each model reflecting an increasingly ecological appreciation for the fundamental role of the natural environment in supporting human health. We conclude that after decades of public health's acceptance of the ecological paradigm, we are only now beginning to assemble knowledge of sophisticated ecological interdependencies and apply this knowledge to the conceptualization and study of the relationship between the natural environment and the determinants of human health.

Show MeSH

Related in: MedlinePlus

The Mandala of Health (reprinted from [21] with permission from Oxford University Press®).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3924488&req=5

ijerph-11-01005-f002: The Mandala of Health (reprinted from [21] with permission from Oxford University Press®).

Mentions: Morris et al. [14] and VanLeeuwen et al. [15] present a number of iterations of conceptual models which emphasize the sophisticated array of ecological influences on public health (it would be remiss not to also mention the decades of work on ecological models of health promotion done by Lawrence Green. In Green, Richard, and Potvin [16], the evolution of ecological thinking in health promotion is presented along with its pervasiveness in many disciplines that relate to public health). The models found in Morris and VanLeeuwen are represented in Figure 1, Figure 2 and Figure 3 below. Figure 4, Figure 5 and Figure 6 were added by the authors of this paper to extend the progression of ecological thinking. These selected frameworks and models do not, nor were they meant to, represent a fully complete set of the determinants of health. Rather, they offer a way to assemble evidence so that its implications and interdependencies are clear. It is these types of models which have aided our understanding of complex ecological systems and the role of nature in them [17].


The portrayal of natural environment in the evolution of the ecological public health paradigm.

Coutts C, Forkink A, Weiner J - Int J Environ Res Public Health (2014)

The Mandala of Health (reprinted from [21] with permission from Oxford University Press®).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3924488&req=5

ijerph-11-01005-f002: The Mandala of Health (reprinted from [21] with permission from Oxford University Press®).
Mentions: Morris et al. [14] and VanLeeuwen et al. [15] present a number of iterations of conceptual models which emphasize the sophisticated array of ecological influences on public health (it would be remiss not to also mention the decades of work on ecological models of health promotion done by Lawrence Green. In Green, Richard, and Potvin [16], the evolution of ecological thinking in health promotion is presented along with its pervasiveness in many disciplines that relate to public health). The models found in Morris and VanLeeuwen are represented in Figure 1, Figure 2 and Figure 3 below. Figure 4, Figure 5 and Figure 6 were added by the authors of this paper to extend the progression of ecological thinking. These selected frameworks and models do not, nor were they meant to, represent a fully complete set of the determinants of health. Rather, they offer a way to assemble evidence so that its implications and interdependencies are clear. It is these types of models which have aided our understanding of complex ecological systems and the role of nature in them [17].

Bottom Line: The natural environment has long been recognized as essential to supporting life, health, and wellbeing.Six models are presented here to demonstrate this evolution, each model reflecting an increasingly ecological appreciation for the fundamental role of the natural environment in supporting human health.We conclude that after decades of public health's acceptance of the ecological paradigm, we are only now beginning to assemble knowledge of sophisticated ecological interdependencies and apply this knowledge to the conceptualization and study of the relationship between the natural environment and the determinants of human health.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Urban and Regional Planning, Center for Demography and Population Health, Florida State University, 113 Collegiate Way, Tallahassee, FL 32306, USA. ccoutts@fsu.edu.

ABSTRACT
This paper explores the conceptualization of the natural environment in an evolving ecological public health paradigm. The natural environment has long been recognized as essential to supporting life, health, and wellbeing. Our understanding of the relationship between the natural environment and health has steadily evolved from one of an undynamic environment to a more sophisticated understanding of ecological interactions.  This evolution is reflected in a number of ecological public health models which demonstrate the many external and overlapping determinants of human health. Six models are presented here to demonstrate this evolution, each model reflecting an increasingly ecological appreciation for the fundamental role of the natural environment in supporting human health. We conclude that after decades of public health's acceptance of the ecological paradigm, we are only now beginning to assemble knowledge of sophisticated ecological interdependencies and apply this knowledge to the conceptualization and study of the relationship between the natural environment and the determinants of human health.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus