Limits...
Rift Valley Fever outbreaks in Mauritania and related environmental conditions.

Caminade C, Ndione JA, Diallo M, MacLeod DA, Faye O, Ba Y, Dia I, Morse AP - Int J Environ Res Public Health (2014)

Bottom Line: Four large outbreaks of Rift Valley Fever (RVF) occurred in Mauritania in 1998, 2003, 2010 and 2012 which caused lots of animal and several human deaths.First human infections were generally reported three to five weeks later.By bridging the gap between meteorological forecasting centers and veterinary services, an early warning system might be developed in Senegal and Mauritania to warn decision makers and health services about the upcoming RVF risk.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Infection and Global Health, University of Liverpool, 8 West Derby Street, Liverpool, L69 7BE, UK. Cyril.Caminade@liverpool.ac.uk.

ABSTRACT
Four large outbreaks of Rift Valley Fever (RVF) occurred in Mauritania in 1998, 2003, 2010 and 2012 which caused lots of animal and several human deaths. We investigated rainfall and vegetation conditions that might have impacted on RVF transmission over the affected regions. Our results corroborate that RVF transmission generally occurs during the months of September and October in Mauritania, similarly to Senegal. The four outbreaks were preceded by a rainless period lasting at least a week followed by heavy precipitation that took place during the second half of the rainy season. First human infections were generally reported three to five weeks later. By bridging the gap between meteorological forecasting centers and veterinary services, an early warning system might be developed in Senegal and Mauritania to warn decision makers and health services about the upcoming RVF risk.

Show MeSH

Related in: MedlinePlus

Rainfall indices (mm) averaged over (a) 15.5°N–17.5°N, 11°W–8.5°W in 1998, (b) 15.5°N–19°N, 16.25°W–11°W in 2003, (c) 19°N–21°N, 14.75°W–12.75°W in 2010 and (d) 15.5°N–19.25°N, 15.85°W–6.5°W in 2012. This is based on the TRMM rainfall dataset; see Figure 1 for a definition of the domains covering the RVF outbreak locations. Right: Cumulative rainfall (mm) for the same areas. The red line depicts the rainfall climatology (1998–2012) calculated for the respective areas. Dry spells are highlighted by the gray shading, large rainfall event are shown with stars and the first human and animal RVF reported cases are depicted by triangles.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3924481&req=5

ijerph-11-00903-f002: Rainfall indices (mm) averaged over (a) 15.5°N–17.5°N, 11°W–8.5°W in 1998, (b) 15.5°N–19°N, 16.25°W–11°W in 2003, (c) 19°N–21°N, 14.75°W–12.75°W in 2010 and (d) 15.5°N–19.25°N, 15.85°W–6.5°W in 2012. This is based on the TRMM rainfall dataset; see Figure 1 for a definition of the domains covering the RVF outbreak locations. Right: Cumulative rainfall (mm) for the same areas. The red line depicts the rainfall climatology (1998–2012) calculated for the respective areas. Dry spells are highlighted by the gray shading, large rainfall event are shown with stars and the first human and animal RVF reported cases are depicted by triangles.

Mentions: The intra-seasonal rainfall variability over the affected regions in 1998, 2003, 2010 and 2012 is further investigated on Figure 2. The rainfall seasonal cycle over those regions exhibits a typical Sahelian pattern as the rainy season usually ranges from July to September with a peak centered in August. About 300 mm of rain are observed annually over the south-eastern and south-western regions whereas about 100 mm is observed over the northern arid region.


Rift Valley Fever outbreaks in Mauritania and related environmental conditions.

Caminade C, Ndione JA, Diallo M, MacLeod DA, Faye O, Ba Y, Dia I, Morse AP - Int J Environ Res Public Health (2014)

Rainfall indices (mm) averaged over (a) 15.5°N–17.5°N, 11°W–8.5°W in 1998, (b) 15.5°N–19°N, 16.25°W–11°W in 2003, (c) 19°N–21°N, 14.75°W–12.75°W in 2010 and (d) 15.5°N–19.25°N, 15.85°W–6.5°W in 2012. This is based on the TRMM rainfall dataset; see Figure 1 for a definition of the domains covering the RVF outbreak locations. Right: Cumulative rainfall (mm) for the same areas. The red line depicts the rainfall climatology (1998–2012) calculated for the respective areas. Dry spells are highlighted by the gray shading, large rainfall event are shown with stars and the first human and animal RVF reported cases are depicted by triangles.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3924481&req=5

ijerph-11-00903-f002: Rainfall indices (mm) averaged over (a) 15.5°N–17.5°N, 11°W–8.5°W in 1998, (b) 15.5°N–19°N, 16.25°W–11°W in 2003, (c) 19°N–21°N, 14.75°W–12.75°W in 2010 and (d) 15.5°N–19.25°N, 15.85°W–6.5°W in 2012. This is based on the TRMM rainfall dataset; see Figure 1 for a definition of the domains covering the RVF outbreak locations. Right: Cumulative rainfall (mm) for the same areas. The red line depicts the rainfall climatology (1998–2012) calculated for the respective areas. Dry spells are highlighted by the gray shading, large rainfall event are shown with stars and the first human and animal RVF reported cases are depicted by triangles.
Mentions: The intra-seasonal rainfall variability over the affected regions in 1998, 2003, 2010 and 2012 is further investigated on Figure 2. The rainfall seasonal cycle over those regions exhibits a typical Sahelian pattern as the rainy season usually ranges from July to September with a peak centered in August. About 300 mm of rain are observed annually over the south-eastern and south-western regions whereas about 100 mm is observed over the northern arid region.

Bottom Line: Four large outbreaks of Rift Valley Fever (RVF) occurred in Mauritania in 1998, 2003, 2010 and 2012 which caused lots of animal and several human deaths.First human infections were generally reported three to five weeks later.By bridging the gap between meteorological forecasting centers and veterinary services, an early warning system might be developed in Senegal and Mauritania to warn decision makers and health services about the upcoming RVF risk.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Infection and Global Health, University of Liverpool, 8 West Derby Street, Liverpool, L69 7BE, UK. Cyril.Caminade@liverpool.ac.uk.

ABSTRACT
Four large outbreaks of Rift Valley Fever (RVF) occurred in Mauritania in 1998, 2003, 2010 and 2012 which caused lots of animal and several human deaths. We investigated rainfall and vegetation conditions that might have impacted on RVF transmission over the affected regions. Our results corroborate that RVF transmission generally occurs during the months of September and October in Mauritania, similarly to Senegal. The four outbreaks were preceded by a rainless period lasting at least a week followed by heavy precipitation that took place during the second half of the rainy season. First human infections were generally reported three to five weeks later. By bridging the gap between meteorological forecasting centers and veterinary services, an early warning system might be developed in Senegal and Mauritania to warn decision makers and health services about the upcoming RVF risk.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus