Limits...
A mobile multi-agent information system for ubiquitous fetal monitoring.

Su CJ, Chu TW - Int J Environ Res Public Health (2014)

Bottom Line: Issues related to interoperability, scalability, and openness in heterogeneous e-health environments are addressed through the adoption of a FIPA2000 standard compliant agent development platform-the Java Agent Development Environment (JADE).Integrating the IMAIS with light-weight, portable fetal monitor devices allows for continuous long-term monitoring without interfering with a patient's everyday activities and without restricting her mobility.The system architecture can be also applied to vast monitoring scenarios such as elder care and vital sign monitoring.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Industrial Engineering & Management, Yuan Ze University, No. 135, Yuan-Tung Rd., Chung-Li City, Taoyuan County 320, Taiwan. iecjsu@saturn.yzu.edu.tw.

ABSTRACT
Electronic fetal monitoring (EFM) systems integrate many previously separate clinical activities related to fetal monitoring. Promoting the use of ubiquitous fetal monitoring services with real time status assessments requires a robust information platform equipped with an automatic diagnosis engine. This paper presents the design and development of a mobile multi-agent platform-based open information systems (IMAIS) with an automated diagnosis engine to support intensive and distributed ubiquitous fetal monitoring. The automatic diagnosis engine that we developed is capable of analyzing data in both traditional paper-based and digital formats. Issues related to interoperability, scalability, and openness in heterogeneous e-health environments are addressed through the adoption of a FIPA2000 standard compliant agent development platform-the Java Agent Development Environment (JADE). Integrating the IMAIS with light-weight, portable fetal monitor devices allows for continuous long-term monitoring without interfering with a patient's everyday activities and without restricting her mobility. The system architecture can be also applied to vast monitoring scenarios such as elder care and vital sign monitoring.

Show MeSH

Related in: MedlinePlus

Example patterns of each symptom: (a) Tachycardia; (b) Bradycardia; (c) Early Deceleration; (d) Late Deceleration; (e) Variable Deceleration—Type A; (f) Variable Deceleration—Type B.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3924463&req=5

ijerph-11-00600-f008: Example patterns of each symptom: (a) Tachycardia; (b) Bradycardia; (c) Early Deceleration; (d) Late Deceleration; (e) Variable Deceleration—Type A; (f) Variable Deceleration—Type B.

Mentions: The characteristics of these five symptoms are mostly qualitative in nature, thus diagnosis accuracy is highly reliant on obstetrician experience and judgment. Reducing the potential for human error and extending the application of automatic diagnosis requires the development of quantitative guidelines. Prior to the collection of data, we discussed diagnosis procedures of various case histories with the attending obstetrician and establish guidelines for each of the five symptoms. Given that doctors may differ in their diagnostic appraisals, the guidelines are not intended to completely match the standards of each doctor. However, the guidelines are largely uniform, and thus only minor adjustments to rule parameters are required to meet the diagnostic requirements of various doctors in clinical contexts. The diagnosis guidelines are discussed below, with each symptom illustrated with example. The patterns of each symptom are shown in Figure 8 while the rules for detecting abnormalities are illustrated in Table 2. Notations are defined as follows:


A mobile multi-agent information system for ubiquitous fetal monitoring.

Su CJ, Chu TW - Int J Environ Res Public Health (2014)

Example patterns of each symptom: (a) Tachycardia; (b) Bradycardia; (c) Early Deceleration; (d) Late Deceleration; (e) Variable Deceleration—Type A; (f) Variable Deceleration—Type B.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3924463&req=5

ijerph-11-00600-f008: Example patterns of each symptom: (a) Tachycardia; (b) Bradycardia; (c) Early Deceleration; (d) Late Deceleration; (e) Variable Deceleration—Type A; (f) Variable Deceleration—Type B.
Mentions: The characteristics of these five symptoms are mostly qualitative in nature, thus diagnosis accuracy is highly reliant on obstetrician experience and judgment. Reducing the potential for human error and extending the application of automatic diagnosis requires the development of quantitative guidelines. Prior to the collection of data, we discussed diagnosis procedures of various case histories with the attending obstetrician and establish guidelines for each of the five symptoms. Given that doctors may differ in their diagnostic appraisals, the guidelines are not intended to completely match the standards of each doctor. However, the guidelines are largely uniform, and thus only minor adjustments to rule parameters are required to meet the diagnostic requirements of various doctors in clinical contexts. The diagnosis guidelines are discussed below, with each symptom illustrated with example. The patterns of each symptom are shown in Figure 8 while the rules for detecting abnormalities are illustrated in Table 2. Notations are defined as follows:

Bottom Line: Issues related to interoperability, scalability, and openness in heterogeneous e-health environments are addressed through the adoption of a FIPA2000 standard compliant agent development platform-the Java Agent Development Environment (JADE).Integrating the IMAIS with light-weight, portable fetal monitor devices allows for continuous long-term monitoring without interfering with a patient's everyday activities and without restricting her mobility.The system architecture can be also applied to vast monitoring scenarios such as elder care and vital sign monitoring.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Industrial Engineering & Management, Yuan Ze University, No. 135, Yuan-Tung Rd., Chung-Li City, Taoyuan County 320, Taiwan. iecjsu@saturn.yzu.edu.tw.

ABSTRACT
Electronic fetal monitoring (EFM) systems integrate many previously separate clinical activities related to fetal monitoring. Promoting the use of ubiquitous fetal monitoring services with real time status assessments requires a robust information platform equipped with an automatic diagnosis engine. This paper presents the design and development of a mobile multi-agent platform-based open information systems (IMAIS) with an automated diagnosis engine to support intensive and distributed ubiquitous fetal monitoring. The automatic diagnosis engine that we developed is capable of analyzing data in both traditional paper-based and digital formats. Issues related to interoperability, scalability, and openness in heterogeneous e-health environments are addressed through the adoption of a FIPA2000 standard compliant agent development platform-the Java Agent Development Environment (JADE). Integrating the IMAIS with light-weight, portable fetal monitor devices allows for continuous long-term monitoring without interfering with a patient's everyday activities and without restricting her mobility. The system architecture can be also applied to vast monitoring scenarios such as elder care and vital sign monitoring.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus