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Adolescent bariatric surgery--thoughts and perspectives from the UK.

Penna M, Markar S, Hewes J, Fiennes A, Jones N, Hashemi M - Int J Environ Res Public Health (2013)

Bottom Line: Ninety-four out of 324 questionnaires were completed. 66% of professionals felt that adolescents with a body mass index (BMI) >40 or BMI >35 with significant co-morbidities can be offered surgery.However, 17% of bariatric surgeons marked no minimum age limit.These views can guide towards a consensus opinion and further development of selection criteria and care pathways.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: UCLH Department of Weight Loss, Metabolic and Endocrine Surgery, University College London Hospital, 235 Euston Road, London NW1 2BU, UK. m.penna@doctors.org.uk.

ABSTRACT
Opinions of healthcare professionals in the United Kingdom regarding bariatric surgery in adolescents are largely unknown. This study aims to explore the perspectives of medical professionals regarding adolescent bariatric surgery. Members of the British Obesity and Metabolic Surgery Society and groups of primary care practitioners based in London were contacted by electronic mail and invited to complete an anonymous online survey consisting of 21 questions. Ninety-four out of 324 questionnaires were completed. 66% of professionals felt that adolescents with a body mass index (BMI) >40 or BMI >35 with significant co-morbidities can be offered surgery. Amongst pre-requisites, parental psychological counseling was chosen most frequently. 58% stated 12 months as an appropriate period for weight management programs, with 24% regarding 6 months as sufficient. Most participants believed bariatric surgery should only be offered ≥ 16 years of age. However, 17% of bariatric surgeons marked no minimum age limit. Over 80% of the healthcare professionals surveyed consider bariatric surgery in adolescents to be acceptable practice. Most healthcare professionals surveyed feel that adolescent bariatric surgery is an acceptable therapeutic option for adolescent obesity. These views can guide towards a consensus opinion and further development of selection criteria and care pathways.

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Minimum body mass index (BMI) for adolescent bariatric surgery; overall responses.
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ijerph-11-00573-f003: Minimum body mass index (BMI) for adolescent bariatric surgery; overall responses.

Mentions: With regards to the minimum BMI above which bariatric surgery should be offered to adolescents the two options most commonly selected were a BMI of 40 and above, and/or a minimum BMI of 35 with other significant metabolic disease that can be improved by losing weight, such as type II diabetes mellitus and hypertension (Figure 3).


Adolescent bariatric surgery--thoughts and perspectives from the UK.

Penna M, Markar S, Hewes J, Fiennes A, Jones N, Hashemi M - Int J Environ Res Public Health (2013)

Minimum body mass index (BMI) for adolescent bariatric surgery; overall responses.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3924461&req=5

ijerph-11-00573-f003: Minimum body mass index (BMI) for adolescent bariatric surgery; overall responses.
Mentions: With regards to the minimum BMI above which bariatric surgery should be offered to adolescents the two options most commonly selected were a BMI of 40 and above, and/or a minimum BMI of 35 with other significant metabolic disease that can be improved by losing weight, such as type II diabetes mellitus and hypertension (Figure 3).

Bottom Line: Ninety-four out of 324 questionnaires were completed. 66% of professionals felt that adolescents with a body mass index (BMI) >40 or BMI >35 with significant co-morbidities can be offered surgery.However, 17% of bariatric surgeons marked no minimum age limit.These views can guide towards a consensus opinion and further development of selection criteria and care pathways.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: UCLH Department of Weight Loss, Metabolic and Endocrine Surgery, University College London Hospital, 235 Euston Road, London NW1 2BU, UK. m.penna@doctors.org.uk.

ABSTRACT
Opinions of healthcare professionals in the United Kingdom regarding bariatric surgery in adolescents are largely unknown. This study aims to explore the perspectives of medical professionals regarding adolescent bariatric surgery. Members of the British Obesity and Metabolic Surgery Society and groups of primary care practitioners based in London were contacted by electronic mail and invited to complete an anonymous online survey consisting of 21 questions. Ninety-four out of 324 questionnaires were completed. 66% of professionals felt that adolescents with a body mass index (BMI) >40 or BMI >35 with significant co-morbidities can be offered surgery. Amongst pre-requisites, parental psychological counseling was chosen most frequently. 58% stated 12 months as an appropriate period for weight management programs, with 24% regarding 6 months as sufficient. Most participants believed bariatric surgery should only be offered ≥ 16 years of age. However, 17% of bariatric surgeons marked no minimum age limit. Over 80% of the healthcare professionals surveyed consider bariatric surgery in adolescents to be acceptable practice. Most healthcare professionals surveyed feel that adolescent bariatric surgery is an acceptable therapeutic option for adolescent obesity. These views can guide towards a consensus opinion and further development of selection criteria and care pathways.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus