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Residential mobility and breast cancer in Marin County, California, USA.

Jacquez GM, Barlow J, Rommel R, Kaufmann A, Rienti M, AvRuskin G, Rasul J - Int J Environ Res Public Health (2013)

Bottom Line: Analysis found significant global clustering of cases localized to specific residential histories and times.However, persistent case-clustering of greater than fifteen years duration was also detected.A biologically plausible exposure or risk factor has yet to be identified.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: BioMedware, Inc., 3526 West Liberty, Suite 100, Ann Arbor, MI 48103, USA. gjacquez@buffalo.edu.

ABSTRACT
Marin County (California, USA) has among the highest incidences of breast cancer in the U.S. A previously conducted case-control study found eight significant risk factors in participants enrolled from 1997-1999. These included being premenopausal, never using birth control pills, lower highest lifetime body mass index, having four or more mammograms from 1990-1994, beginning drinking alcohol after age 21, drinking an average two or more alcoholic drinks per day, being in the highest quartile of pack-years of cigarette smoking, and being raised in an organized religion. Previously conducted surveys provided residential histories; while statistic accounted for participants' residential mobility, and assessed clustering of breast cancer cases relative to controls based on the known risk factors. These identified specific cases, places, and times of excess breast cancer risk. Analysis found significant global clustering of cases localized to specific residential histories and times. Much of the observed clustering occurred among participants who immigrated to Marin County. However, persistent case-clustering of greater than fifteen years duration was also detected. Significant case-clustering among long-term residents may indicate geographically localized risk factors not accounted for in the study design, as well as uncertainty and incompleteness in the acquired addresses. Other plausible explanations include environmental risk factors and cases tending to settle in specific areas. A biologically plausible exposure or risk factor has yet to be identified.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Life course place of residence for study participants in Marin County (upper left), California (upper right), and from across the United States (bottom). Cases are denoted as purple circles, and controls as gray crosses.
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ijerph-11-00271-f004: Life course place of residence for study participants in Marin County (upper left), California (upper right), and from across the United States (bottom). Cases are denoted as purple circles, and controls as gray crosses.

Mentions: The strong bimodal distribution in Figure 3 identifies the “mover” and “stayer” sub-groups, with movers coming to Marin County from all portions of the United States. This raises an important question: How much of any observed clustering occurs among stayers (and hence may be attributable to local factors in Marin), and how much occurs among movers, and thus may represent risk factors that were imported from external populations (e.g., immigration of women from areas of high breast cancer risk such as Long Island)? To further quantify overall residential mobility in the study population places of residence for study participants were mapped at three spatial scales: Marin County, California and the Continental United States (see Figure 4).


Residential mobility and breast cancer in Marin County, California, USA.

Jacquez GM, Barlow J, Rommel R, Kaufmann A, Rienti M, AvRuskin G, Rasul J - Int J Environ Res Public Health (2013)

Life course place of residence for study participants in Marin County (upper left), California (upper right), and from across the United States (bottom). Cases are denoted as purple circles, and controls as gray crosses.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3924444&req=5

ijerph-11-00271-f004: Life course place of residence for study participants in Marin County (upper left), California (upper right), and from across the United States (bottom). Cases are denoted as purple circles, and controls as gray crosses.
Mentions: The strong bimodal distribution in Figure 3 identifies the “mover” and “stayer” sub-groups, with movers coming to Marin County from all portions of the United States. This raises an important question: How much of any observed clustering occurs among stayers (and hence may be attributable to local factors in Marin), and how much occurs among movers, and thus may represent risk factors that were imported from external populations (e.g., immigration of women from areas of high breast cancer risk such as Long Island)? To further quantify overall residential mobility in the study population places of residence for study participants were mapped at three spatial scales: Marin County, California and the Continental United States (see Figure 4).

Bottom Line: Analysis found significant global clustering of cases localized to specific residential histories and times.However, persistent case-clustering of greater than fifteen years duration was also detected.A biologically plausible exposure or risk factor has yet to be identified.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: BioMedware, Inc., 3526 West Liberty, Suite 100, Ann Arbor, MI 48103, USA. gjacquez@buffalo.edu.

ABSTRACT
Marin County (California, USA) has among the highest incidences of breast cancer in the U.S. A previously conducted case-control study found eight significant risk factors in participants enrolled from 1997-1999. These included being premenopausal, never using birth control pills, lower highest lifetime body mass index, having four or more mammograms from 1990-1994, beginning drinking alcohol after age 21, drinking an average two or more alcoholic drinks per day, being in the highest quartile of pack-years of cigarette smoking, and being raised in an organized religion. Previously conducted surveys provided residential histories; while statistic accounted for participants' residential mobility, and assessed clustering of breast cancer cases relative to controls based on the known risk factors. These identified specific cases, places, and times of excess breast cancer risk. Analysis found significant global clustering of cases localized to specific residential histories and times. Much of the observed clustering occurred among participants who immigrated to Marin County. However, persistent case-clustering of greater than fifteen years duration was also detected. Significant case-clustering among long-term residents may indicate geographically localized risk factors not accounted for in the study design, as well as uncertainty and incompleteness in the acquired addresses. Other plausible explanations include environmental risk factors and cases tending to settle in specific areas. A biologically plausible exposure or risk factor has yet to be identified.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus