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Why some employees adopt or resist reorganization of work practices in health care: associations between perceived loss of resources, burnout, and attitudes to change.

Dubois CA, Bentein K, Mansour JB, Gilbert F, Bédard JL - Int J Environ Res Public Health (2013)

Bottom Line: In recent years, successive work reorganization initiatives have been implemented in many healthcare settings.Our findings are consistent with the conservation of resources theory.In confirming the temporal relationship between perceived loss of resources, occupational burnout, and attitude to change, this research offers a new perspective to explain negative and positive reactions to change implementation.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Faculty of Nursing, University of Montreal, C.P. 6128, succ. Centre-ville, Montréal, QC H3C 3J7, Canada. carl.ardy.dubois@umontreal.ca.

ABSTRACT
In recent years, successive work reorganization initiatives have been implemented in many healthcare settings. The failure of many of these change efforts has often been attributed in the prominent management discourse to change resistance. Few studies have paid attention to the temporal process of workers' resource depletion/accumulation over time and its links with workers' psychological states and reactions to change. Drawing upon the conservation of resources theory, this study examines associations between workers' perceptions of loss of resources, burnout, and attitudes to change. The study was conducted in five health and social service centres in Quebec, in units where a work reorganization project was initiated. A prospective longitudinal design was used to assess workers' perceptions at two time points 12 months apart. Our findings are consistent with the conservation of resources theory. The analysis of latent differences scores between times 1 and 2 showed that the perceived loss of resources was associated with emotional exhaustion, which, in turn, was negatively correlated with commitment to change and positively correlated with cynicism. In confirming the temporal relationship between perceived loss of resources, occupational burnout, and attitude to change, this research offers a new perspective to explain negative and positive reactions to change implementation.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

A model using a path graphic representation with two factors.
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ijerph-11-00187-f001: A model using a path graphic representation with two factors.

Mentions: Because this study focused on the dynamic interplay among several changing constructs that evolved over time, the LDS model was extended to a multiple-LDS model with paths linking the latent differences to each other. This extension of latent difference scores can be used to test hypotheses that changes in resources are a primary predictor of subsequent changes in burnout between time 1 and time 2. Thus, a multiple-common-factor latent change model (a model combining two or more latent change constructs ∆f, ∆g, ...) and its parameters (variance, covariance, and path coefficients) allowed us to test hypotheses about change over time related to two or more constructs, e.g., the relationship between latent change in autonomy (∆autonomy[T2−T1]) and latent change in emotional exhaustion (∆emotional-exhaustion[T2−T1]). Figure 1 portrays such a model using a path graphic representation with two factors: autonomy (AUT) and burnout (BO).


Why some employees adopt or resist reorganization of work practices in health care: associations between perceived loss of resources, burnout, and attitudes to change.

Dubois CA, Bentein K, Mansour JB, Gilbert F, Bédard JL - Int J Environ Res Public Health (2013)

A model using a path graphic representation with two factors.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3924440&req=5

ijerph-11-00187-f001: A model using a path graphic representation with two factors.
Mentions: Because this study focused on the dynamic interplay among several changing constructs that evolved over time, the LDS model was extended to a multiple-LDS model with paths linking the latent differences to each other. This extension of latent difference scores can be used to test hypotheses that changes in resources are a primary predictor of subsequent changes in burnout between time 1 and time 2. Thus, a multiple-common-factor latent change model (a model combining two or more latent change constructs ∆f, ∆g, ...) and its parameters (variance, covariance, and path coefficients) allowed us to test hypotheses about change over time related to two or more constructs, e.g., the relationship between latent change in autonomy (∆autonomy[T2−T1]) and latent change in emotional exhaustion (∆emotional-exhaustion[T2−T1]). Figure 1 portrays such a model using a path graphic representation with two factors: autonomy (AUT) and burnout (BO).

Bottom Line: In recent years, successive work reorganization initiatives have been implemented in many healthcare settings.Our findings are consistent with the conservation of resources theory.In confirming the temporal relationship between perceived loss of resources, occupational burnout, and attitude to change, this research offers a new perspective to explain negative and positive reactions to change implementation.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Faculty of Nursing, University of Montreal, C.P. 6128, succ. Centre-ville, Montréal, QC H3C 3J7, Canada. carl.ardy.dubois@umontreal.ca.

ABSTRACT
In recent years, successive work reorganization initiatives have been implemented in many healthcare settings. The failure of many of these change efforts has often been attributed in the prominent management discourse to change resistance. Few studies have paid attention to the temporal process of workers' resource depletion/accumulation over time and its links with workers' psychological states and reactions to change. Drawing upon the conservation of resources theory, this study examines associations between workers' perceptions of loss of resources, burnout, and attitudes to change. The study was conducted in five health and social service centres in Quebec, in units where a work reorganization project was initiated. A prospective longitudinal design was used to assess workers' perceptions at two time points 12 months apart. Our findings are consistent with the conservation of resources theory. The analysis of latent differences scores between times 1 and 2 showed that the perceived loss of resources was associated with emotional exhaustion, which, in turn, was negatively correlated with commitment to change and positively correlated with cynicism. In confirming the temporal relationship between perceived loss of resources, occupational burnout, and attitude to change, this research offers a new perspective to explain negative and positive reactions to change implementation.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus