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Associations of meteorology with adverse pregnancy outcomes: a systematic review of preeclampsia, preterm birth and birth weight.

Beltran AJ, Wu J, Laurent O - Int J Environ Res Public Health (2013)

Bottom Line: Patterns of decreased gestational lengths have been observed for births in winter, as well as summer months.Most analytical studies also report decreases in gestational lengths associated with heat.Available results should encourage further etiological research aiming at enhancing our understanding of the relationships between meteorology and adverse pregnancy outcomes, ideally via harmonized multicentric studies.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Program in Public Health, Anteater Instruction & Research Bldg (AIRB), 653 East Peltason Drive, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697, USA. junwu@uci.edu.

ABSTRACT
The relationships between meteorology and pregnancy outcomes are not well known. This article reviews available evidence on the relationships between seasonality or meteorology and three major pregnancy outcomes: the hypertensive disorders of pregnancy (including preeclampsia, eclampsia and gestational hypertension), gestational length and birth weight. In total 35, 28 and 27 studies were identified for each of these outcomes. The risks of preeclampsia appear higher for women with conception during the warmest months, and delivery in the coldest months of the year. Delivery in the coldest months is also associated with a higher eclampsia risk. Patterns of decreased gestational lengths have been observed for births in winter, as well as summer months. Most analytical studies also report decreases in gestational lengths associated with heat. Birth weights are lower for deliveries occurring in winter and in summer months. Only a limited number of studies have investigated the effects of barometric pressure on gestational length or the effects of temperature and sunshine exposure on birth weight, but these questions appear worth investigating further. Available results should encourage further etiological research aiming at enhancing our understanding of the relationships between meteorology and adverse pregnancy outcomes, ideally via harmonized multicentric studies.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Pooled relative risks and 95% credible interval for the variation in eclampsia incidence by month of birth (N = 550,881 births).
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ijerph-11-00091-f003: Pooled relative risks and 95% credible interval for the variation in eclampsia incidence by month of birth (N = 550,881 births).

Mentions: No study examined eclampsia risk in relation to the time of conception. However, ten studies examining eclampsia focused on seasonality of birth (Table 1). Four studies were identified for the meta-analysis of month-to-month variations (Table A9), with three in non-tropical countries and one in a tropical setting in India [33]. However, the monthly variations in temperature in the tropical setting were judged sufficiently comparable with those of non-tropical settings. The result of the meta-analysis including 550,881 births (Figure 3) shows a decrease in risk from the coolest to the warmest months of births, followed by an increase in risk from the warmest to the coolest months of births, with significantly higher risks for the months of December/June to March/September as compared to the month of July/January (for the North/South hemisphere respectively). A significantly increased risk is also observed for the August/February month. If the largest study in Sweden (contributed 88% of pregnancies) [34] is excluded, these patterns remain although statistical significance is lost (Table A10).


Associations of meteorology with adverse pregnancy outcomes: a systematic review of preeclampsia, preterm birth and birth weight.

Beltran AJ, Wu J, Laurent O - Int J Environ Res Public Health (2013)

Pooled relative risks and 95% credible interval for the variation in eclampsia incidence by month of birth (N = 550,881 births).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3924438&req=5

ijerph-11-00091-f003: Pooled relative risks and 95% credible interval for the variation in eclampsia incidence by month of birth (N = 550,881 births).
Mentions: No study examined eclampsia risk in relation to the time of conception. However, ten studies examining eclampsia focused on seasonality of birth (Table 1). Four studies were identified for the meta-analysis of month-to-month variations (Table A9), with three in non-tropical countries and one in a tropical setting in India [33]. However, the monthly variations in temperature in the tropical setting were judged sufficiently comparable with those of non-tropical settings. The result of the meta-analysis including 550,881 births (Figure 3) shows a decrease in risk from the coolest to the warmest months of births, followed by an increase in risk from the warmest to the coolest months of births, with significantly higher risks for the months of December/June to March/September as compared to the month of July/January (for the North/South hemisphere respectively). A significantly increased risk is also observed for the August/February month. If the largest study in Sweden (contributed 88% of pregnancies) [34] is excluded, these patterns remain although statistical significance is lost (Table A10).

Bottom Line: Patterns of decreased gestational lengths have been observed for births in winter, as well as summer months.Most analytical studies also report decreases in gestational lengths associated with heat.Available results should encourage further etiological research aiming at enhancing our understanding of the relationships between meteorology and adverse pregnancy outcomes, ideally via harmonized multicentric studies.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Program in Public Health, Anteater Instruction & Research Bldg (AIRB), 653 East Peltason Drive, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697, USA. junwu@uci.edu.

ABSTRACT
The relationships between meteorology and pregnancy outcomes are not well known. This article reviews available evidence on the relationships between seasonality or meteorology and three major pregnancy outcomes: the hypertensive disorders of pregnancy (including preeclampsia, eclampsia and gestational hypertension), gestational length and birth weight. In total 35, 28 and 27 studies were identified for each of these outcomes. The risks of preeclampsia appear higher for women with conception during the warmest months, and delivery in the coldest months of the year. Delivery in the coldest months is also associated with a higher eclampsia risk. Patterns of decreased gestational lengths have been observed for births in winter, as well as summer months. Most analytical studies also report decreases in gestational lengths associated with heat. Birth weights are lower for deliveries occurring in winter and in summer months. Only a limited number of studies have investigated the effects of barometric pressure on gestational length or the effects of temperature and sunshine exposure on birth weight, but these questions appear worth investigating further. Available results should encourage further etiological research aiming at enhancing our understanding of the relationships between meteorology and adverse pregnancy outcomes, ideally via harmonized multicentric studies.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus