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Climate change and public health policy: translating the science.

Braks M, van Ginkel R, Wint W, Sedda L, Sprong H - Int J Environ Res Public Health (2013)

Bottom Line: They may get overwhelmed by the volume of heterogeneous information in scientific articles and risk relying purely on the public opinion articles which focus mainly on global warming trends, and leave out many other relevant factors.In the context of mosquito borne diseases, we identify common pitfalls to watch out for when assessing scientific research on the impact of climate change on human health.We aim to provide guidance through the plethora of scientific papers and views on the impact of climate change on human health to those new to the subject, as well as to remind public health experts of its multifactorial and multidisciplinary character.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Centre for Zoonoses and Environmental Microbiology, National Institute for Public Health and the Environment, P.O. Box 1, Bilthoven 3720 BA, The Netherlands. marieta.braks@rivm.nl.

ABSTRACT
Public health authorities are required to prepare for future threats and need predictions of the likely impact of climate change on public health risks. They may get overwhelmed by the volume of heterogeneous information in scientific articles and risk relying purely on the public opinion articles which focus mainly on global warming trends, and leave out many other relevant factors. In the current paper, we discuss various scientific approaches investigating climate change and its possible impact on public health and discuss their different roles and functions in unraveling the complexity of the subject. It is not our objective to review the available literature or to make predictions for certain diseases or countries, but rather to evaluate the applicability of scientific research articles on climate change to evidence-based public health decisions. In the context of mosquito borne diseases, we identify common pitfalls to watch out for when assessing scientific research on the impact of climate change on human health. We aim to provide guidance through the plethora of scientific papers and views on the impact of climate change on human health to those new to the subject, as well as to remind public health experts of its multifactorial and multidisciplinary character.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Schematic representation of the transmission cycles of (a) dengue virus, (b) Rift valley fever virus, (c) West Nile fever virus.
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ijerph-11-00013-f001: Schematic representation of the transmission cycles of (a) dengue virus, (b) Rift valley fever virus, (c) West Nile fever virus.

Mentions: An established vector population alone does not pose an immediate risk without another critical element: the presence of the pathogen itself. Depending on the pathogen, an infection can cause disease in human, livestock and wildlife. Some mosquito borne pathogens are maintained in a human-vector-human cycle, whilst the lifecycles of others also involve (wild) reservoir host animals. Here, humans frequently act as dead end hosts from which pathogens are not transmitted to other susceptible hosts [10] (Figure 1).


Climate change and public health policy: translating the science.

Braks M, van Ginkel R, Wint W, Sedda L, Sprong H - Int J Environ Res Public Health (2013)

Schematic representation of the transmission cycles of (a) dengue virus, (b) Rift valley fever virus, (c) West Nile fever virus.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3924434&req=5

ijerph-11-00013-f001: Schematic representation of the transmission cycles of (a) dengue virus, (b) Rift valley fever virus, (c) West Nile fever virus.
Mentions: An established vector population alone does not pose an immediate risk without another critical element: the presence of the pathogen itself. Depending on the pathogen, an infection can cause disease in human, livestock and wildlife. Some mosquito borne pathogens are maintained in a human-vector-human cycle, whilst the lifecycles of others also involve (wild) reservoir host animals. Here, humans frequently act as dead end hosts from which pathogens are not transmitted to other susceptible hosts [10] (Figure 1).

Bottom Line: They may get overwhelmed by the volume of heterogeneous information in scientific articles and risk relying purely on the public opinion articles which focus mainly on global warming trends, and leave out many other relevant factors.In the context of mosquito borne diseases, we identify common pitfalls to watch out for when assessing scientific research on the impact of climate change on human health.We aim to provide guidance through the plethora of scientific papers and views on the impact of climate change on human health to those new to the subject, as well as to remind public health experts of its multifactorial and multidisciplinary character.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Centre for Zoonoses and Environmental Microbiology, National Institute for Public Health and the Environment, P.O. Box 1, Bilthoven 3720 BA, The Netherlands. marieta.braks@rivm.nl.

ABSTRACT
Public health authorities are required to prepare for future threats and need predictions of the likely impact of climate change on public health risks. They may get overwhelmed by the volume of heterogeneous information in scientific articles and risk relying purely on the public opinion articles which focus mainly on global warming trends, and leave out many other relevant factors. In the current paper, we discuss various scientific approaches investigating climate change and its possible impact on public health and discuss their different roles and functions in unraveling the complexity of the subject. It is not our objective to review the available literature or to make predictions for certain diseases or countries, but rather to evaluate the applicability of scientific research articles on climate change to evidence-based public health decisions. In the context of mosquito borne diseases, we identify common pitfalls to watch out for when assessing scientific research on the impact of climate change on human health. We aim to provide guidance through the plethora of scientific papers and views on the impact of climate change on human health to those new to the subject, as well as to remind public health experts of its multifactorial and multidisciplinary character.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus