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Ethnoveterinary plants of Ankober District, North Shewa Zone, Amhara Region, Ethiopia.

Lulekal E, Asfaw Z, Kelbessa E, Van Damme P - J Ethnobiol Ethnomed (2014)

Bottom Line: Indigenous knowledge on use of medicinal plants for ethnoveterinary purposes among different informant groups was compared using One-way ANOVA and t-tests.The study indicated that indigenous knowledge on ethnoveterinary medicinal plant use is still rich and active in the District.Species with recorded highest consensus for curative role are a useful pool for further phytochemical and pharmacological validation for better utilization.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Laboratory for Tropical and Subtropical Agriculture and Ethnobotany, Department of Plant Production, Faculty of Bio-Science Engineering, Ghent University, Coupure links 653, 9000 Ghent, Belgium. ermiasmulekal.molla@Ugent.be.

ABSTRACT

Background: Traditional herbal preparations for addressing veterinary problems have been applied in Ankober District, Ethiopia, for generations. However, the millennia-old ethnoveterinary knowledge of the community, and the plants are subjected to loss without being scientifically documented due to anthropogenic and environmental threats. Hence, this study aims at providing a comprehensive documentation on ethnoveterinary plant knowledge of the people in order to preserve the fast-eroding knowledge and resources of the area.

Methods: Semi-structured interviews, focus group discussions, participant observation and walk-in-the-woods methods were used to gather ethnoveterinary data. Informant Consensus Factor (ICF) and Fidelity level (FL) values were calculated using quantitative approaches so as to check the level of informants' agreement on plant use and healing potential of ethnoveterinary medicinal plant species, respectively. Indigenous knowledge on use of medicinal plants for ethnoveterinary purposes among different informant groups was compared using One-way ANOVA and t-tests.

Results: A total of 51 plant species representing 50 genera and 35 botanical families used in the treatment of 33 different ailments were identified. Medicinal plant species belonging to families Asteraceae, Asclepiadaceae, Euphorbiaceae and Ranunculaceae were reported to be of frequent use in the local ethnoveterinary medical system. Roots (65%, 33 species) were most often utilized for remedy preparation. Highest ICF values were recorded for gastro-intestinal (0.71) ailments depicting best agreement on knowledge of medicinal plants used to treat ailments in this category. Embelia schimperi Vatke showed highest fidelity level value (90%) to treat gastro-intestinal diseases showing conformity of knowledge on this species' healing potential. Significant difference (P<0.05) was observed in average number of therapeutic plants reported by senior members of the community than younger groups. Embelia schimperi Vatke and Rubus steudnerii Schweinf. were the most-preferred species to treat diarrhoea.

Conclusion: The study indicated that indigenous knowledge on ethnoveterinary medicinal plant use is still rich and active in the District. Species with recorded highest consensus for curative role are a useful pool for further phytochemical and pharmacological validation for better utilization. Declining wild medicinal flora of the area calls for implementation of a coordinated complementary in situ and ex situ conservation strategy.

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Modes of remedy preparation for treating livestock ailments in Ankober District.
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Figure 4: Modes of remedy preparation for treating livestock ailments in Ankober District.

Mentions: Various modes of remedy preparation were reported to be used in the District based on type and degree of complexity of livestock ailment. Pounding the remedial part and homogenizing it with cold water was found to be the major mode of remedy preparation (54%), followed by extracting juice, oil or latex from the plant (20%) (FigureĀ 4).


Ethnoveterinary plants of Ankober District, North Shewa Zone, Amhara Region, Ethiopia.

Lulekal E, Asfaw Z, Kelbessa E, Van Damme P - J Ethnobiol Ethnomed (2014)

Modes of remedy preparation for treating livestock ailments in Ankober District.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3924401&req=5

Figure 4: Modes of remedy preparation for treating livestock ailments in Ankober District.
Mentions: Various modes of remedy preparation were reported to be used in the District based on type and degree of complexity of livestock ailment. Pounding the remedial part and homogenizing it with cold water was found to be the major mode of remedy preparation (54%), followed by extracting juice, oil or latex from the plant (20%) (FigureĀ 4).

Bottom Line: Indigenous knowledge on use of medicinal plants for ethnoveterinary purposes among different informant groups was compared using One-way ANOVA and t-tests.The study indicated that indigenous knowledge on ethnoveterinary medicinal plant use is still rich and active in the District.Species with recorded highest consensus for curative role are a useful pool for further phytochemical and pharmacological validation for better utilization.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Laboratory for Tropical and Subtropical Agriculture and Ethnobotany, Department of Plant Production, Faculty of Bio-Science Engineering, Ghent University, Coupure links 653, 9000 Ghent, Belgium. ermiasmulekal.molla@Ugent.be.

ABSTRACT

Background: Traditional herbal preparations for addressing veterinary problems have been applied in Ankober District, Ethiopia, for generations. However, the millennia-old ethnoveterinary knowledge of the community, and the plants are subjected to loss without being scientifically documented due to anthropogenic and environmental threats. Hence, this study aims at providing a comprehensive documentation on ethnoveterinary plant knowledge of the people in order to preserve the fast-eroding knowledge and resources of the area.

Methods: Semi-structured interviews, focus group discussions, participant observation and walk-in-the-woods methods were used to gather ethnoveterinary data. Informant Consensus Factor (ICF) and Fidelity level (FL) values were calculated using quantitative approaches so as to check the level of informants' agreement on plant use and healing potential of ethnoveterinary medicinal plant species, respectively. Indigenous knowledge on use of medicinal plants for ethnoveterinary purposes among different informant groups was compared using One-way ANOVA and t-tests.

Results: A total of 51 plant species representing 50 genera and 35 botanical families used in the treatment of 33 different ailments were identified. Medicinal plant species belonging to families Asteraceae, Asclepiadaceae, Euphorbiaceae and Ranunculaceae were reported to be of frequent use in the local ethnoveterinary medical system. Roots (65%, 33 species) were most often utilized for remedy preparation. Highest ICF values were recorded for gastro-intestinal (0.71) ailments depicting best agreement on knowledge of medicinal plants used to treat ailments in this category. Embelia schimperi Vatke showed highest fidelity level value (90%) to treat gastro-intestinal diseases showing conformity of knowledge on this species' healing potential. Significant difference (P<0.05) was observed in average number of therapeutic plants reported by senior members of the community than younger groups. Embelia schimperi Vatke and Rubus steudnerii Schweinf. were the most-preferred species to treat diarrhoea.

Conclusion: The study indicated that indigenous knowledge on ethnoveterinary medicinal plant use is still rich and active in the District. Species with recorded highest consensus for curative role are a useful pool for further phytochemical and pharmacological validation for better utilization. Declining wild medicinal flora of the area calls for implementation of a coordinated complementary in situ and ex situ conservation strategy.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus