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Use of graphene as protection film in biological environments.

Zhang W, Lee S, McNear KL, Chung TF, Lee S, Lee K, Crist SA, Ratliff TL, Zhong Z, Chen YP, Yang C - Sci Rep (2014)

Bottom Line: We confirmed graphene effectively inhibits Cu surface from corrosion in different biological aqueous environments.Finally, an animal experiment showed the effective protection of graphene to Cu under in vivo condition.Our results open up the potential for using graphene coating to protect metal surface in biomedical application.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Chemistry, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907, United States.

ABSTRACT
Corrosion of metal in biomedical devices could cause serious health problems to patients. Currently ceramics coating materials used in metal implants can reduce corrosion to some extent with limitations. Here we proposed graphene as a biocompatible protective film for metal potentially for biomedical application. We confirmed graphene effectively inhibits Cu surface from corrosion in different biological aqueous environments. Results from cell viability tests suggested that graphene greatly eliminates the toxicity of Cu by inhibiting corrosion and reducing the concentration of Cu(2+) ions produced. We demonstrated that additional thiol derivatives assembled on graphene coated Cu surface can prominently enhance durability of sole graphene protection limited by the defects in graphene film. We also demonstrated that graphene coating reduced the immune response to metal in a clinical setting for the first time through the lymphocyte transformation test. Finally, an animal experiment showed the effective protection of graphene to Cu under in vivo condition. Our results open up the potential for using graphene coating to protect metal surface in biomedical application.

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Relative cell viability of bone cells incubated with SLG/Cu, BLG/Cu and bare Cu foil for 1 day.Control is the regular cell culture without presence of any Cu foil.
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f2: Relative cell viability of bone cells incubated with SLG/Cu, BLG/Cu and bare Cu foil for 1 day.Control is the regular cell culture without presence of any Cu foil.

Mentions: To evaluate the protection effect of graphene, we performed cell viability tests using graphene coated Cu as a toxic source in the MG-63 cell culture. After seeding cell suspension in cell culture plates, sterilized SLG/Cu, BLG/Cu foils and Cu foil with the identical sizes were added to individual wells. A regular culture in a well untreated with any foils was used as the control. Cellular experiments for each sample were conducted in triplicate. After incubation for 1 day, A metabolic activity assay, 3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2, 5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) was performed to assess the cell viability of each well. Cell viability data was normalized to what is measured for the control. Testing the cytotoxicity of Cu2+ ions intentionally delivered into cells was not in the scope of this study. A typical set of results is illustrated in Fig. 2. After incubation for 1 day the well with SLG/Cu sample shows 100.4% ± 2.2% cell viability, identical to the control, and the cell viability measured for the BLG/Cu sample is 97.6% ± 2.8%. In contrast, the cell viability for the well with Cu foil is approximately zero.


Use of graphene as protection film in biological environments.

Zhang W, Lee S, McNear KL, Chung TF, Lee S, Lee K, Crist SA, Ratliff TL, Zhong Z, Chen YP, Yang C - Sci Rep (2014)

Relative cell viability of bone cells incubated with SLG/Cu, BLG/Cu and bare Cu foil for 1 day.Control is the regular cell culture without presence of any Cu foil.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3924215&req=5

f2: Relative cell viability of bone cells incubated with SLG/Cu, BLG/Cu and bare Cu foil for 1 day.Control is the regular cell culture without presence of any Cu foil.
Mentions: To evaluate the protection effect of graphene, we performed cell viability tests using graphene coated Cu as a toxic source in the MG-63 cell culture. After seeding cell suspension in cell culture plates, sterilized SLG/Cu, BLG/Cu foils and Cu foil with the identical sizes were added to individual wells. A regular culture in a well untreated with any foils was used as the control. Cellular experiments for each sample were conducted in triplicate. After incubation for 1 day, A metabolic activity assay, 3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2, 5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) was performed to assess the cell viability of each well. Cell viability data was normalized to what is measured for the control. Testing the cytotoxicity of Cu2+ ions intentionally delivered into cells was not in the scope of this study. A typical set of results is illustrated in Fig. 2. After incubation for 1 day the well with SLG/Cu sample shows 100.4% ± 2.2% cell viability, identical to the control, and the cell viability measured for the BLG/Cu sample is 97.6% ± 2.8%. In contrast, the cell viability for the well with Cu foil is approximately zero.

Bottom Line: We confirmed graphene effectively inhibits Cu surface from corrosion in different biological aqueous environments.Finally, an animal experiment showed the effective protection of graphene to Cu under in vivo condition.Our results open up the potential for using graphene coating to protect metal surface in biomedical application.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Chemistry, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907, United States.

ABSTRACT
Corrosion of metal in biomedical devices could cause serious health problems to patients. Currently ceramics coating materials used in metal implants can reduce corrosion to some extent with limitations. Here we proposed graphene as a biocompatible protective film for metal potentially for biomedical application. We confirmed graphene effectively inhibits Cu surface from corrosion in different biological aqueous environments. Results from cell viability tests suggested that graphene greatly eliminates the toxicity of Cu by inhibiting corrosion and reducing the concentration of Cu(2+) ions produced. We demonstrated that additional thiol derivatives assembled on graphene coated Cu surface can prominently enhance durability of sole graphene protection limited by the defects in graphene film. We also demonstrated that graphene coating reduced the immune response to metal in a clinical setting for the first time through the lymphocyte transformation test. Finally, an animal experiment showed the effective protection of graphene to Cu under in vivo condition. Our results open up the potential for using graphene coating to protect metal surface in biomedical application.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus