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Toward a vestibular contribution to social cognition.

Deroualle D, Lopez C - Front Integr Neurosci (2014)

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Laboratoire de Neurosciences Intégratives et Adaptatives, UMR 7260, Centre Saint Charles, Fédération de Recherche 3C, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, Aix-Marseille Université Marseille, France.

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Within the last few years, one productive line of research in social neuroscience has investigated the multisensory and motor foundations of self-other interactions, including emotion perception, emotional contagion, empathy, self-other distinction, or self-other knowledge (e.g., Singer et al., ; Iacoboni et al., ; Ambrosini et al., ; Manera et al., )... We present several lines of evidence indicating that vestibular signals may be involved in the sensory bases of self-other distinction and mirroring, emotion perception and perspective taking... Thus, some authors have drawn parallels between visuo-spatial perspective taking and empathy, another form of perspective taking allowing to understand emotional states of others (Berthoz, ; Mohr et al., )... There is to date only few studies on the sensorimotor foundations of third-person perspective taking... Similar disturbing effects of vestibular stimulation on whole-body mental imagery have been reported during galvanic (Lenggenhager et al., ) and caloric (Falconer and Mast, ) vestibular stimulation... In conclusion, we propose that vestibular signals are not only involved in self-motion perception, but also in mental simulation of self-motion, which seems necessary to adopt the (visual or affective) perspective of another individual... Similarly, the observation of someone else's face being touched facilitates the detection of tactile stimuli applied to one's own face (Serino et al., )... These effects have been related to a mirror neuron system, a group of neurons in the parieto-frontal cortex found crucial for social cognition (Rizzolatti and Craighero, ; Singer and Lamm, )... Other important vestibular regions have been found in the primary and secondary somatosensory cortex, intraparietal sulcus, precuneus and cingulate cortex (Bottini et al., ; Dieterich et al., ; Kahane et al., ; Lopez et al., )... Importantly, several vestibular areas overlap those classically found involved in social cognition... We have summarized several behavioral and neuroimaging evidence from vestibular physiology and social neuroscience and have speculated on a vestibular contribution to several sensorimotor bases of social cognition... Yet, until now the vestibular cortex and neural bases of social cognition have been investigated in separate studies due to the lack of connections between the research fields of vestibular physiology and social neuroscience... We are optimistic that future research will endeavor to establish such interdisciplinary connections and propose that investigations of the multisensory foundations of social cognition should now incorporate the study of vestibular signals.

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Anatomical overlap between areas involved in vestibular processing, self-processing, and social cognition. (A) Results of a meta-analysis showing brain regions activated by various techniques of vestibular stimulation. Adapted from Lopez et al. (2012). (B) Temporo-parietal cortex where transcranial magnetic stimulation modified illusory self-attribution of a non-corporeal object. Adapted from Tsakiris et al. (2008). (C) Temporo-parietal region involved in egocentric mental rotation tasks. Reproduced from Blanke et al. (2005). (D,E) Brain regions involved in theory of mind and empathy. Reproduced from Decety and Lamm (2007).
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Figure 1: Anatomical overlap between areas involved in vestibular processing, self-processing, and social cognition. (A) Results of a meta-analysis showing brain regions activated by various techniques of vestibular stimulation. Adapted from Lopez et al. (2012). (B) Temporo-parietal cortex where transcranial magnetic stimulation modified illusory self-attribution of a non-corporeal object. Adapted from Tsakiris et al. (2008). (C) Temporo-parietal region involved in egocentric mental rotation tasks. Reproduced from Blanke et al. (2005). (D,E) Brain regions involved in theory of mind and empathy. Reproduced from Decety and Lamm (2007).

Mentions: We propose that vestibular contributions to the sensorimotor mechanisms of social cognition are mediated by vestibular projections to multisensory regions found to be crucial for self and social processing. The vestibular cortex is composed of at least ten multisensory areas (review in Lopez and Blanke, 2011). This vestibular network is centered on the Sylvian fissure and covered the temporo-parietal junction (TPJ), superior temporal gyrus, inferior parietal lobule, parietal operculum, and insula (Figure 1A). Other important vestibular regions have been found in the primary and secondary somatosensory cortex, intraparietal sulcus, precuneus and cingulate cortex (Bottini et al., 1994; Dieterich et al., 2003; Kahane et al., 2003; Lopez et al., 2012).


Toward a vestibular contribution to social cognition.

Deroualle D, Lopez C - Front Integr Neurosci (2014)

Anatomical overlap between areas involved in vestibular processing, self-processing, and social cognition. (A) Results of a meta-analysis showing brain regions activated by various techniques of vestibular stimulation. Adapted from Lopez et al. (2012). (B) Temporo-parietal cortex where transcranial magnetic stimulation modified illusory self-attribution of a non-corporeal object. Adapted from Tsakiris et al. (2008). (C) Temporo-parietal region involved in egocentric mental rotation tasks. Reproduced from Blanke et al. (2005). (D,E) Brain regions involved in theory of mind and empathy. Reproduced from Decety and Lamm (2007).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
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getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3924147&req=5

Figure 1: Anatomical overlap between areas involved in vestibular processing, self-processing, and social cognition. (A) Results of a meta-analysis showing brain regions activated by various techniques of vestibular stimulation. Adapted from Lopez et al. (2012). (B) Temporo-parietal cortex where transcranial magnetic stimulation modified illusory self-attribution of a non-corporeal object. Adapted from Tsakiris et al. (2008). (C) Temporo-parietal region involved in egocentric mental rotation tasks. Reproduced from Blanke et al. (2005). (D,E) Brain regions involved in theory of mind and empathy. Reproduced from Decety and Lamm (2007).
Mentions: We propose that vestibular contributions to the sensorimotor mechanisms of social cognition are mediated by vestibular projections to multisensory regions found to be crucial for self and social processing. The vestibular cortex is composed of at least ten multisensory areas (review in Lopez and Blanke, 2011). This vestibular network is centered on the Sylvian fissure and covered the temporo-parietal junction (TPJ), superior temporal gyrus, inferior parietal lobule, parietal operculum, and insula (Figure 1A). Other important vestibular regions have been found in the primary and secondary somatosensory cortex, intraparietal sulcus, precuneus and cingulate cortex (Bottini et al., 1994; Dieterich et al., 2003; Kahane et al., 2003; Lopez et al., 2012).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Laboratoire de Neurosciences Intégratives et Adaptatives, UMR 7260, Centre Saint Charles, Fédération de Recherche 3C, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, Aix-Marseille Université Marseille, France.

AUTOMATICALLY GENERATED EXCERPT
Please rate it.

Within the last few years, one productive line of research in social neuroscience has investigated the multisensory and motor foundations of self-other interactions, including emotion perception, emotional contagion, empathy, self-other distinction, or self-other knowledge (e.g., Singer et al., ; Iacoboni et al., ; Ambrosini et al., ; Manera et al., )... We present several lines of evidence indicating that vestibular signals may be involved in the sensory bases of self-other distinction and mirroring, emotion perception and perspective taking... Thus, some authors have drawn parallels between visuo-spatial perspective taking and empathy, another form of perspective taking allowing to understand emotional states of others (Berthoz, ; Mohr et al., )... There is to date only few studies on the sensorimotor foundations of third-person perspective taking... Similar disturbing effects of vestibular stimulation on whole-body mental imagery have been reported during galvanic (Lenggenhager et al., ) and caloric (Falconer and Mast, ) vestibular stimulation... In conclusion, we propose that vestibular signals are not only involved in self-motion perception, but also in mental simulation of self-motion, which seems necessary to adopt the (visual or affective) perspective of another individual... Similarly, the observation of someone else's face being touched facilitates the detection of tactile stimuli applied to one's own face (Serino et al., )... These effects have been related to a mirror neuron system, a group of neurons in the parieto-frontal cortex found crucial for social cognition (Rizzolatti and Craighero, ; Singer and Lamm, )... Other important vestibular regions have been found in the primary and secondary somatosensory cortex, intraparietal sulcus, precuneus and cingulate cortex (Bottini et al., ; Dieterich et al., ; Kahane et al., ; Lopez et al., )... Importantly, several vestibular areas overlap those classically found involved in social cognition... We have summarized several behavioral and neuroimaging evidence from vestibular physiology and social neuroscience and have speculated on a vestibular contribution to several sensorimotor bases of social cognition... Yet, until now the vestibular cortex and neural bases of social cognition have been investigated in separate studies due to the lack of connections between the research fields of vestibular physiology and social neuroscience... We are optimistic that future research will endeavor to establish such interdisciplinary connections and propose that investigations of the multisensory foundations of social cognition should now incorporate the study of vestibular signals.

No MeSH data available.