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Frequently asked questions in allergy practice.

Tan XX, Xie P, Kwek JL, Kwek SY, Yang Z, Soon W, Leong JL, Wang DY - Asia Pac Allergy (2014)

Bottom Line: However, their impact on knowledge and standard of clinical practice among primary care physicians and specialists is unknown.Seven medical students who attended 3-day 1st International Basic Allergy Course (2010) took down all questions raised during the entire course.Our study identified several problems that, if tackled, could help minimize confusion and provide better care for patients suffering from allergic diseases especially in the ASEAN region.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore, Singapore 119228, Singapore.

ABSTRACT

Background: Over the last 10-20 years, international guidelines and consensus statements for the management of common allergic diseases (e.g. allergic rhinitis and asthma) have been developed and disseminated worldwide. However, their impact on knowledge and standard of clinical practice among primary care physicians and specialists is unknown.

Objective: To investigate need for an improvement in the dissemination of international guidelines for the diagnosis and management of allergic rhinitis.

Methods: Seven medical students who attended 3-day 1st International Basic Allergy Course (2010) took down all questions raised during the entire course. A systemic analysis of these questions was performed to identify areas for improvement in diagnosis and management of allergic diseases mainly in the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) region.

Results: 268 participants, 143 males and 125 females, comprising Ear, Nose and Throat (ENT) specialists (n = 106) and trainees (n = 34), general practitioners (n = 87), and other healthcare professionals (n = 41) attended the course. Of the 103 questions recorded, 59 were regarding treatment modalities in allergy practice such as immunotherapy (n = 38), pharmacologics (n = 15), nasal surgery (n = 2), and others (n = 4). 41 questions (39.8%) have answers based in the Allergic Rhinitis and its Impact on Asthma guidelines (2001 and 2008). Certain questions were selected for further analysis because they appeared to be (a) more commonly asked (e.g. immunotherapy) or (b) were deemed to be challenging or, even controversial (e.g. food allergy and differential diagnosis between vasovagal and anaphylaxis reaction), as the recommendations in current international guidelines were less well-defined.

Conclusion: Our study identified several problems that, if tackled, could help minimize confusion and provide better care for patients suffering from allergic diseases especially in the ASEAN region.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Types of adverse reactions to food as classified by European Academy of Allergology and Clinical Immunology [7].
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Figure 3: Types of adverse reactions to food as classified by European Academy of Allergology and Clinical Immunology [7].

Mentions: The terminology that appears to have gained credibility [8] among healthcare providers is that adopted by the European Academy of Allergology and Clinical Immunology (EAACI) (Fig. 3) [7]. The EAACI classifies adverse food reactions, which are divided into toxic and non-toxic reactions. Toxic food reactions are a result of direct action of food components with no involvement of immune mechanisms. Examples of such toxic food reactions are contaminants in food. Non-toxic food reactions can be further classified into immune-mediated or non-immune-mediated reactions.


Frequently asked questions in allergy practice.

Tan XX, Xie P, Kwek JL, Kwek SY, Yang Z, Soon W, Leong JL, Wang DY - Asia Pac Allergy (2014)

Types of adverse reactions to food as classified by European Academy of Allergology and Clinical Immunology [7].
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3921870&req=5

Figure 3: Types of adverse reactions to food as classified by European Academy of Allergology and Clinical Immunology [7].
Mentions: The terminology that appears to have gained credibility [8] among healthcare providers is that adopted by the European Academy of Allergology and Clinical Immunology (EAACI) (Fig. 3) [7]. The EAACI classifies adverse food reactions, which are divided into toxic and non-toxic reactions. Toxic food reactions are a result of direct action of food components with no involvement of immune mechanisms. Examples of such toxic food reactions are contaminants in food. Non-toxic food reactions can be further classified into immune-mediated or non-immune-mediated reactions.

Bottom Line: However, their impact on knowledge and standard of clinical practice among primary care physicians and specialists is unknown.Seven medical students who attended 3-day 1st International Basic Allergy Course (2010) took down all questions raised during the entire course.Our study identified several problems that, if tackled, could help minimize confusion and provide better care for patients suffering from allergic diseases especially in the ASEAN region.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore, Singapore 119228, Singapore.

ABSTRACT

Background: Over the last 10-20 years, international guidelines and consensus statements for the management of common allergic diseases (e.g. allergic rhinitis and asthma) have been developed and disseminated worldwide. However, their impact on knowledge and standard of clinical practice among primary care physicians and specialists is unknown.

Objective: To investigate need for an improvement in the dissemination of international guidelines for the diagnosis and management of allergic rhinitis.

Methods: Seven medical students who attended 3-day 1st International Basic Allergy Course (2010) took down all questions raised during the entire course. A systemic analysis of these questions was performed to identify areas for improvement in diagnosis and management of allergic diseases mainly in the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) region.

Results: 268 participants, 143 males and 125 females, comprising Ear, Nose and Throat (ENT) specialists (n = 106) and trainees (n = 34), general practitioners (n = 87), and other healthcare professionals (n = 41) attended the course. Of the 103 questions recorded, 59 were regarding treatment modalities in allergy practice such as immunotherapy (n = 38), pharmacologics (n = 15), nasal surgery (n = 2), and others (n = 4). 41 questions (39.8%) have answers based in the Allergic Rhinitis and its Impact on Asthma guidelines (2001 and 2008). Certain questions were selected for further analysis because they appeared to be (a) more commonly asked (e.g. immunotherapy) or (b) were deemed to be challenging or, even controversial (e.g. food allergy and differential diagnosis between vasovagal and anaphylaxis reaction), as the recommendations in current international guidelines were less well-defined.

Conclusion: Our study identified several problems that, if tackled, could help minimize confusion and provide better care for patients suffering from allergic diseases especially in the ASEAN region.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus