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Idiopathic spontaneous rupture of the urinary bladder (SRUB). A case report and review of literature.

Al-Qassim Z, Mohammed A, England R, Khan Z - Cent European J Urol (2012)

Bottom Line: It is usually secondary to an underlying pathology.An idiopathic entity has not been reported in the literature.SRUB is usually secondary to an underlying pathology, but in extremely rare cases it can be idiopathic.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Urology Unit, Kettering General Hospital, Northamptonshire, United Kingdom.

ABSTRACT
Spontaneous rupture of the urinary bladder (SRUB) is a rare urological emergency. It is usually secondary to an underlying pathology. An idiopathic entity has not been reported in the literature. We report a case of idiopathic SRUB in a young female presented with abdominal pain and acute renal injury in the absence of prior trauma. We have conducted a literature review to identify commonly reported etiologies. SRUB is usually secondary to an underlying pathology, but in extremely rare cases it can be idiopathic.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Cystogram image four weeks post operation showing complete healing and no leak.
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Figure 0004: Cystogram image four weeks post operation showing complete healing and no leak.

Mentions: The patient passed a trial without a catheter after a normal cystogram (Fig. 4). A subsequent MRI of the pelvis and spine ruled out pelvic or spinal cord pathology (Fig. 5). A urodynamic study was performed three months after showing an entirely stable bladder during the filling phase, and she voided to completion with a normal flow rate. A follow up cystoscopy was performed afterwards and was again normal. She remains asymptomatic.


Idiopathic spontaneous rupture of the urinary bladder (SRUB). A case report and review of literature.

Al-Qassim Z, Mohammed A, England R, Khan Z - Cent European J Urol (2012)

Cystogram image four weeks post operation showing complete healing and no leak.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3921816&req=5

Figure 0004: Cystogram image four weeks post operation showing complete healing and no leak.
Mentions: The patient passed a trial without a catheter after a normal cystogram (Fig. 4). A subsequent MRI of the pelvis and spine ruled out pelvic or spinal cord pathology (Fig. 5). A urodynamic study was performed three months after showing an entirely stable bladder during the filling phase, and she voided to completion with a normal flow rate. A follow up cystoscopy was performed afterwards and was again normal. She remains asymptomatic.

Bottom Line: It is usually secondary to an underlying pathology.An idiopathic entity has not been reported in the literature.SRUB is usually secondary to an underlying pathology, but in extremely rare cases it can be idiopathic.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Urology Unit, Kettering General Hospital, Northamptonshire, United Kingdom.

ABSTRACT
Spontaneous rupture of the urinary bladder (SRUB) is a rare urological emergency. It is usually secondary to an underlying pathology. An idiopathic entity has not been reported in the literature. We report a case of idiopathic SRUB in a young female presented with abdominal pain and acute renal injury in the absence of prior trauma. We have conducted a literature review to identify commonly reported etiologies. SRUB is usually secondary to an underlying pathology, but in extremely rare cases it can be idiopathic.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus