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Idiopathic spontaneous rupture of the urinary bladder (SRUB). A case report and review of literature.

Al-Qassim Z, Mohammed A, England R, Khan Z - Cent European J Urol (2012)

Bottom Line: It is usually secondary to an underlying pathology.An idiopathic entity has not been reported in the literature.SRUB is usually secondary to an underlying pathology, but in extremely rare cases it can be idiopathic.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Urology Unit, Kettering General Hospital, Northamptonshire, United Kingdom.

ABSTRACT
Spontaneous rupture of the urinary bladder (SRUB) is a rare urological emergency. It is usually secondary to an underlying pathology. An idiopathic entity has not been reported in the literature. We report a case of idiopathic SRUB in a young female presented with abdominal pain and acute renal injury in the absence of prior trauma. We have conducted a literature review to identify commonly reported etiologies. SRUB is usually secondary to an underlying pathology, but in extremely rare cases it can be idiopathic.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

CT scan of the pelvis showing free fluid around a collapsed empty bladder with the catheter tip within.
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Figure 0001: CT scan of the pelvis showing free fluid around a collapsed empty bladder with the catheter tip within.

Mentions: The patient was catheterized with a 14F silicon catheter, which immediately drained 250 mL of bloodstained urine. A diuretic phase eventually resulted in normalization of her renal function. She had a CT scan that confirmed the presence of somewhat large amounts of free fluid in the peritoneum (Fig. 1), as well as normal kidneys and an empty bladder. The patient underwent an urgent diagnostic laparoscopy that revealed a flaccid empty bladder with a small perforation on the dome of the bladder (Figs. 2 and 3) with no other intra-abdominal pathologies. Biopsies were taken from the cut edge of the bladder and it was repaired using delayed absorbable Polydiaxanon 2/0 suture material in two layers. A silicon urethral catheter was used for bladder drainage while the retro-pubic space was drained with a Penrose tube drain. The histology report confirmed a nonspecifically inflamed bladder wall with no evidence of malignancy.


Idiopathic spontaneous rupture of the urinary bladder (SRUB). A case report and review of literature.

Al-Qassim Z, Mohammed A, England R, Khan Z - Cent European J Urol (2012)

CT scan of the pelvis showing free fluid around a collapsed empty bladder with the catheter tip within.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3921816&req=5

Figure 0001: CT scan of the pelvis showing free fluid around a collapsed empty bladder with the catheter tip within.
Mentions: The patient was catheterized with a 14F silicon catheter, which immediately drained 250 mL of bloodstained urine. A diuretic phase eventually resulted in normalization of her renal function. She had a CT scan that confirmed the presence of somewhat large amounts of free fluid in the peritoneum (Fig. 1), as well as normal kidneys and an empty bladder. The patient underwent an urgent diagnostic laparoscopy that revealed a flaccid empty bladder with a small perforation on the dome of the bladder (Figs. 2 and 3) with no other intra-abdominal pathologies. Biopsies were taken from the cut edge of the bladder and it was repaired using delayed absorbable Polydiaxanon 2/0 suture material in two layers. A silicon urethral catheter was used for bladder drainage while the retro-pubic space was drained with a Penrose tube drain. The histology report confirmed a nonspecifically inflamed bladder wall with no evidence of malignancy.

Bottom Line: It is usually secondary to an underlying pathology.An idiopathic entity has not been reported in the literature.SRUB is usually secondary to an underlying pathology, but in extremely rare cases it can be idiopathic.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Urology Unit, Kettering General Hospital, Northamptonshire, United Kingdom.

ABSTRACT
Spontaneous rupture of the urinary bladder (SRUB) is a rare urological emergency. It is usually secondary to an underlying pathology. An idiopathic entity has not been reported in the literature. We report a case of idiopathic SRUB in a young female presented with abdominal pain and acute renal injury in the absence of prior trauma. We have conducted a literature review to identify commonly reported etiologies. SRUB is usually secondary to an underlying pathology, but in extremely rare cases it can be idiopathic.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus