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Milk of calcium (MOC) cysts masquerading as renal calculi - a trap for the unwary.

Khan SA, Khan FR, Fletcher MS, Richenberg JL - Cent European J Urol (2012)

Bottom Line: Although reported to be rare, in fact it seems to be more common than previously thought.It has characteristic appearances on plain x-rays, ultrasound, and CT imaging particularly in the prone and supine positions.In this paper, a series of cases is presented outlining its characteristic features and reviewing the relevant literature.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Urology, Kettering General Hospital, Kettering Northampshire, United Kingdom.

ABSTRACT
Milk of calcium (MOC) is a colloidal suspension of calcium salts occurring in calyceal cysts and diverticula. Although reported to be rare, in fact it seems to be more common than previously thought. It has characteristic appearances on plain x-rays, ultrasound, and CT imaging particularly in the prone and supine positions. Often entirely asymptomatic, its appearance may be mistaken for renal stones on radiography or angiomyolipomas on ultrasonography. In this paper, a series of cases is presented outlining its characteristic features and reviewing the relevant literature.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Supine non-contrast CT scan, axial section through the kidneys. Low attenuation cyst in the posterior cortex of the right kidney contains milk of calcium (MOC), layering out with fluid-fluid level.
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Figure 0005: Supine non-contrast CT scan, axial section through the kidneys. Low attenuation cyst in the posterior cortex of the right kidney contains milk of calcium (MOC), layering out with fluid-fluid level.

Mentions: A 46-year-old female presented with vague intermittent right upper quadrant and loin pain. She denied any urinary symptoms and the urinalysis was negative. IVU demonstrated a 13 mm calcific density in the upper pole of the right kidney with prompt bilateral excretion. USG revealed a 2.5 cm echogenic lesion in the liver with posterior acoustic enhancement consistent with a hemangioma. The appearances of the renal lesion were of mixed low and high attenuation with a fluid level. There were no solid elements within it. A non-contrast CT scan confirmed the presence of a 2.5 cm cyst in the right posterior superior renal cortex with a fluid interface and characteristic calcific layering posteriorly in the supine position (Fig. 5). A diagnosis of MOC cyst was made and the patient's symptoms were attributed to the possible hemangioma.


Milk of calcium (MOC) cysts masquerading as renal calculi - a trap for the unwary.

Khan SA, Khan FR, Fletcher MS, Richenberg JL - Cent European J Urol (2012)

Supine non-contrast CT scan, axial section through the kidneys. Low attenuation cyst in the posterior cortex of the right kidney contains milk of calcium (MOC), layering out with fluid-fluid level.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3921799&req=5

Figure 0005: Supine non-contrast CT scan, axial section through the kidneys. Low attenuation cyst in the posterior cortex of the right kidney contains milk of calcium (MOC), layering out with fluid-fluid level.
Mentions: A 46-year-old female presented with vague intermittent right upper quadrant and loin pain. She denied any urinary symptoms and the urinalysis was negative. IVU demonstrated a 13 mm calcific density in the upper pole of the right kidney with prompt bilateral excretion. USG revealed a 2.5 cm echogenic lesion in the liver with posterior acoustic enhancement consistent with a hemangioma. The appearances of the renal lesion were of mixed low and high attenuation with a fluid level. There were no solid elements within it. A non-contrast CT scan confirmed the presence of a 2.5 cm cyst in the right posterior superior renal cortex with a fluid interface and characteristic calcific layering posteriorly in the supine position (Fig. 5). A diagnosis of MOC cyst was made and the patient's symptoms were attributed to the possible hemangioma.

Bottom Line: Although reported to be rare, in fact it seems to be more common than previously thought.It has characteristic appearances on plain x-rays, ultrasound, and CT imaging particularly in the prone and supine positions.In this paper, a series of cases is presented outlining its characteristic features and reviewing the relevant literature.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Urology, Kettering General Hospital, Kettering Northampshire, United Kingdom.

ABSTRACT
Milk of calcium (MOC) is a colloidal suspension of calcium salts occurring in calyceal cysts and diverticula. Although reported to be rare, in fact it seems to be more common than previously thought. It has characteristic appearances on plain x-rays, ultrasound, and CT imaging particularly in the prone and supine positions. Often entirely asymptomatic, its appearance may be mistaken for renal stones on radiography or angiomyolipomas on ultrasonography. In this paper, a series of cases is presented outlining its characteristic features and reviewing the relevant literature.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus