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Milk of calcium (MOC) cysts masquerading as renal calculi - a trap for the unwary.

Khan SA, Khan FR, Fletcher MS, Richenberg JL - Cent European J Urol (2012)

Bottom Line: Although reported to be rare, in fact it seems to be more common than previously thought.It has characteristic appearances on plain x-rays, ultrasound, and CT imaging particularly in the prone and supine positions.In this paper, a series of cases is presented outlining its characteristic features and reviewing the relevant literature.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Urology, Kettering General Hospital, Kettering Northampshire, United Kingdom.

ABSTRACT
Milk of calcium (MOC) is a colloidal suspension of calcium salts occurring in calyceal cysts and diverticula. Although reported to be rare, in fact it seems to be more common than previously thought. It has characteristic appearances on plain x-rays, ultrasound, and CT imaging particularly in the prone and supine positions. Often entirely asymptomatic, its appearance may be mistaken for renal stones on radiography or angiomyolipomas on ultrasonography. In this paper, a series of cases is presented outlining its characteristic features and reviewing the relevant literature.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Prone non-contrast CT scan, section through the kidneys. Left kidney: Dense material (milk of calcium) layers out in a dependent fashion with a stark fluid-fluid level.
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Figure 0002: Prone non-contrast CT scan, section through the kidneys. Left kidney: Dense material (milk of calcium) layers out in a dependent fashion with a stark fluid-fluid level.

Mentions: A 54-year-old man experienced bilateral loin pain and frank hematuria lasting for a few days. He had received ESWL to a left renal calculus 12 years prior to presentation. He was apyrexial with normal abdominal examination. Urinalysis revealed microscopic hematuria although with negative urine cultures. KUB revealed a right upper quadrant dense opacity possibly lying within the right kidney. USG of the kidney failed to detect a renal stone. A CT scan was performed and suggested the presence of bilateral renal cysts with a calcium fluid interface characteristic of MOC cysts (Fig. 2).


Milk of calcium (MOC) cysts masquerading as renal calculi - a trap for the unwary.

Khan SA, Khan FR, Fletcher MS, Richenberg JL - Cent European J Urol (2012)

Prone non-contrast CT scan, section through the kidneys. Left kidney: Dense material (milk of calcium) layers out in a dependent fashion with a stark fluid-fluid level.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3921799&req=5

Figure 0002: Prone non-contrast CT scan, section through the kidneys. Left kidney: Dense material (milk of calcium) layers out in a dependent fashion with a stark fluid-fluid level.
Mentions: A 54-year-old man experienced bilateral loin pain and frank hematuria lasting for a few days. He had received ESWL to a left renal calculus 12 years prior to presentation. He was apyrexial with normal abdominal examination. Urinalysis revealed microscopic hematuria although with negative urine cultures. KUB revealed a right upper quadrant dense opacity possibly lying within the right kidney. USG of the kidney failed to detect a renal stone. A CT scan was performed and suggested the presence of bilateral renal cysts with a calcium fluid interface characteristic of MOC cysts (Fig. 2).

Bottom Line: Although reported to be rare, in fact it seems to be more common than previously thought.It has characteristic appearances on plain x-rays, ultrasound, and CT imaging particularly in the prone and supine positions.In this paper, a series of cases is presented outlining its characteristic features and reviewing the relevant literature.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Urology, Kettering General Hospital, Kettering Northampshire, United Kingdom.

ABSTRACT
Milk of calcium (MOC) is a colloidal suspension of calcium salts occurring in calyceal cysts and diverticula. Although reported to be rare, in fact it seems to be more common than previously thought. It has characteristic appearances on plain x-rays, ultrasound, and CT imaging particularly in the prone and supine positions. Often entirely asymptomatic, its appearance may be mistaken for renal stones on radiography or angiomyolipomas on ultrasonography. In this paper, a series of cases is presented outlining its characteristic features and reviewing the relevant literature.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus