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Carcinoma in the inactive bladder - the dilemma of the forgotten organ.

Kupś M, Słojewski M, Oszurek O, Sikorski A - Cent European J Urol (2012)

Bottom Line: Etiologic factors affecting bladder tumor have been well confirmed and it is widely recognized that carcinogenic substances in urine may play an important role in a pathogenesis.Carcinoma developing in a defunctionalized bladder, although uncommon, does occur.We report a case of a transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) found in a remaining bladder of a male patient and a review of the most relevant literature.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Urology and Urological Oncology, Pomeranian Medical University, Szczecin, Poland.

ABSTRACT
Etiologic factors affecting bladder tumor have been well confirmed and it is widely recognized that carcinogenic substances in urine may play an important role in a pathogenesis. Carcinoma developing in a defunctionalized bladder, although uncommon, does occur. We report a case of a transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) found in a remaining bladder of a male patient and a review of the most relevant literature.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

MRI – pathological lesion in the bladder.
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Figure 0001: MRI – pathological lesion in the bladder.

Mentions: A 43-year-old non-smoker male was admitted to our department with a suspicion of a bladder tumor. The lesion was accidentally found in a nuclear magnetic resonance test performed due to a pain of the spinal column (Fig. 1). One month before admission to the hospital the patient experienced an episode of pyocystitis that was accompanied by high fever. In childhood he underwent a bilateral ureterocutaneostomy due to a vesicoureteral reflux and was diagnosed with kidney failure. At the age of 28 he underwent a left nephrectomy due to a pyelonephritis and dialysis was started. Three years later, the afunctional right kidney was removed. Cystoscopy performed before that operation revealed a decreased volume of the bladder, while no neoplasmatic changes were yet found. During the present hospitalization of the patient, a transurethral resection of a bladder (TURB) was performed (Fig. 2). Numerous papillary tumors (cTam) were radically resected. The maximal diameter of a lesion was 3 cm. Microbiological examination of evacuated pus revealed the presence of E.coli with medium sensitivity to antibiotics. Pathological report revealed grade III transitional cell carcinoma (TCC; pTaNxMx). Although the patient was offered a cystectomy, he refused the procedure due to a risk of a possible erectile dysfunction. Therefore he was planned for a regular cystoscopic follow-up. Check-up performed one month after TURB procedure did not reveal any pathological lesion. Further cystoscopies have been scheduled for the patient classified to a high-risk group (based on guidelines of the European Board of Urology). BCG therapy has not been considered due to a recurrent pyocystitis.


Carcinoma in the inactive bladder - the dilemma of the forgotten organ.

Kupś M, Słojewski M, Oszurek O, Sikorski A - Cent European J Urol (2012)

MRI – pathological lesion in the bladder.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3921762&req=5

Figure 0001: MRI – pathological lesion in the bladder.
Mentions: A 43-year-old non-smoker male was admitted to our department with a suspicion of a bladder tumor. The lesion was accidentally found in a nuclear magnetic resonance test performed due to a pain of the spinal column (Fig. 1). One month before admission to the hospital the patient experienced an episode of pyocystitis that was accompanied by high fever. In childhood he underwent a bilateral ureterocutaneostomy due to a vesicoureteral reflux and was diagnosed with kidney failure. At the age of 28 he underwent a left nephrectomy due to a pyelonephritis and dialysis was started. Three years later, the afunctional right kidney was removed. Cystoscopy performed before that operation revealed a decreased volume of the bladder, while no neoplasmatic changes were yet found. During the present hospitalization of the patient, a transurethral resection of a bladder (TURB) was performed (Fig. 2). Numerous papillary tumors (cTam) were radically resected. The maximal diameter of a lesion was 3 cm. Microbiological examination of evacuated pus revealed the presence of E.coli with medium sensitivity to antibiotics. Pathological report revealed grade III transitional cell carcinoma (TCC; pTaNxMx). Although the patient was offered a cystectomy, he refused the procedure due to a risk of a possible erectile dysfunction. Therefore he was planned for a regular cystoscopic follow-up. Check-up performed one month after TURB procedure did not reveal any pathological lesion. Further cystoscopies have been scheduled for the patient classified to a high-risk group (based on guidelines of the European Board of Urology). BCG therapy has not been considered due to a recurrent pyocystitis.

Bottom Line: Etiologic factors affecting bladder tumor have been well confirmed and it is widely recognized that carcinogenic substances in urine may play an important role in a pathogenesis.Carcinoma developing in a defunctionalized bladder, although uncommon, does occur.We report a case of a transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) found in a remaining bladder of a male patient and a review of the most relevant literature.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Urology and Urological Oncology, Pomeranian Medical University, Szczecin, Poland.

ABSTRACT
Etiologic factors affecting bladder tumor have been well confirmed and it is widely recognized that carcinogenic substances in urine may play an important role in a pathogenesis. Carcinoma developing in a defunctionalized bladder, although uncommon, does occur. We report a case of a transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) found in a remaining bladder of a male patient and a review of the most relevant literature.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus