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A fusional anomaly of the epididymis associated with recurrent testicular torsion.

Aminu S, Syed K, Gunendran T, Young G - Cent European J Urol (2012)

Bottom Line: A 31-year-old man with recurrent testicular torsion and infertility was found to have a fusional anomaly of the epididymis on scrotal exploration in which only the head of epididymis was attached to the testis, while the body and tail were completely free.He had bilateral orchidopexy, which relieved pain and recurrent torsion.Literature search has shown that infertility is more associated with congenital anomalies of the epididymis and not with recurrent torsions.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Federated Department of Urology, University Hospital of South Manchester at Trafford General Hospital, Manchester, United Kingdom.

ABSTRACT
A 31-year-old man with recurrent testicular torsion and infertility was found to have a fusional anomaly of the epididymis on scrotal exploration in which only the head of epididymis was attached to the testis, while the body and tail were completely free. He had bilateral orchidopexy, which relieved pain and recurrent torsion. He was then referred for fertility treatment. Literature search has shown that infertility is more associated with congenital anomalies of the epididymis and not with recurrent torsions.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

An illustration showing epididymis attached to the testis only at its head and the inverted V deformity.
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Figure 0001: An illustration showing epididymis attached to the testis only at its head and the inverted V deformity.

Mentions: Exploration was performed and the right testis was found to be normal with a long spermatic cord. Three-point fixation was performed with 3/0 prolene. On opening the left scrotal sac, the spermatic cord was long and torted. The testis was additionally torted in a cranio-caudal axis such that the upper pole was facing down. Additionally, the body and tail of the left epididymis were completely unattached to the body and lower pole of the left testis, leaving only the head of the epididymis attached to the body. There was thus an inverted V defect with the apex of the V at the head of epididymis (Fig. 1). The lower pole was smooth and the tunica albuginea looked pale. A three-point fixation was again performed.


A fusional anomaly of the epididymis associated with recurrent testicular torsion.

Aminu S, Syed K, Gunendran T, Young G - Cent European J Urol (2012)

An illustration showing epididymis attached to the testis only at its head and the inverted V deformity.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3921756&req=5

Figure 0001: An illustration showing epididymis attached to the testis only at its head and the inverted V deformity.
Mentions: Exploration was performed and the right testis was found to be normal with a long spermatic cord. Three-point fixation was performed with 3/0 prolene. On opening the left scrotal sac, the spermatic cord was long and torted. The testis was additionally torted in a cranio-caudal axis such that the upper pole was facing down. Additionally, the body and tail of the left epididymis were completely unattached to the body and lower pole of the left testis, leaving only the head of the epididymis attached to the body. There was thus an inverted V defect with the apex of the V at the head of epididymis (Fig. 1). The lower pole was smooth and the tunica albuginea looked pale. A three-point fixation was again performed.

Bottom Line: A 31-year-old man with recurrent testicular torsion and infertility was found to have a fusional anomaly of the epididymis on scrotal exploration in which only the head of epididymis was attached to the testis, while the body and tail were completely free.He had bilateral orchidopexy, which relieved pain and recurrent torsion.Literature search has shown that infertility is more associated with congenital anomalies of the epididymis and not with recurrent torsions.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Federated Department of Urology, University Hospital of South Manchester at Trafford General Hospital, Manchester, United Kingdom.

ABSTRACT
A 31-year-old man with recurrent testicular torsion and infertility was found to have a fusional anomaly of the epididymis on scrotal exploration in which only the head of epididymis was attached to the testis, while the body and tail were completely free. He had bilateral orchidopexy, which relieved pain and recurrent torsion. He was then referred for fertility treatment. Literature search has shown that infertility is more associated with congenital anomalies of the epididymis and not with recurrent torsions.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus