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Blood loss during laparoscopic radical prostatectomy - is it significant or not?

Poletajew S, Antoniewicz AA - Cent European J Urol (2012)

Bottom Line: At the same time points, we measured creatinine serum concentration and calculated eGFR to avoid the data misinterpretation resulting from impaired renal function in the postoperative period.Statistically and clinically significant differences regarding all BCC parameters measured pre- and postoperatively were observed.Simultaneously, renal function was stable with no significant change in eGFR (82.9 ml/min/1.73 m^2 vs. 79.09 ml/min/1.73 m^2, p = 0.28).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Urology, Interforest Specialist Hospital, Warsaw, Poland.

ABSTRACT

Introduction: The traditional assessment of blood loss during laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (LRP) is based on the blood volume collected intraoperatively in the suction device bottles. While this method is not perfect, analysis of changes in blood cell count (BCC) resulting from LRP is advisable.

Material and methods: 71 men were submitted to LRP due to prostate cancer in our institution over an 18-month time period. From this group, we isolated 60 men with clinically minimal intraoperative blood loss (<200 ml) and included them into the study. Mean age of the cohort was 62.8 years. We performed standard BCC on the day before and 6 hours after the surgery. At the same time points, we measured creatinine serum concentration and calculated eGFR to avoid the data misinterpretation resulting from impaired renal function in the postoperative period.

Results: Statistically and clinically significant differences regarding all BCC parameters measured pre- and postoperatively were observed. The number of red blood cells, hemoglobin concentration, and hematocrit diminished by 17.5% (4.68T/l vs. 3.86T/l, p <0.02), 17.0% (8.93 mmol/l vs. 7.41 mmol/l, p < 0.02), and 17.9% (0.429 vs. 0.352, p <0.02), respectively. Simultaneously, renal function was stable with no significant change in eGFR (82.9 ml/min/1.73 m^2 vs. 79.09 ml/min/1.73 m^2, p = 0.28).

Conclusions: Standard LRP brings on a significant blood loss. While clinically insignificant, this blood loss seems to be as high as approx. 600 ml based on laboratory findings. BCC seems to be a more accurate method of intraoperative blood loss estimation compared to measurement of blood volume collected intraoperatively in the suction device bottles.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Changes in the concentration of hemoglobin resulting from LRP.
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Figure 0002: Changes in the concentration of hemoglobin resulting from LRP.

Mentions: We noticed statistically and clinically significant differences regarding all BCC parameters measured at the two time intervals. Detailed results are presented in Table 1 and Figures 1 and 2.


Blood loss during laparoscopic radical prostatectomy - is it significant or not?

Poletajew S, Antoniewicz AA - Cent European J Urol (2012)

Changes in the concentration of hemoglobin resulting from LRP.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3921755&req=5

Figure 0002: Changes in the concentration of hemoglobin resulting from LRP.
Mentions: We noticed statistically and clinically significant differences regarding all BCC parameters measured at the two time intervals. Detailed results are presented in Table 1 and Figures 1 and 2.

Bottom Line: At the same time points, we measured creatinine serum concentration and calculated eGFR to avoid the data misinterpretation resulting from impaired renal function in the postoperative period.Statistically and clinically significant differences regarding all BCC parameters measured pre- and postoperatively were observed.Simultaneously, renal function was stable with no significant change in eGFR (82.9 ml/min/1.73 m^2 vs. 79.09 ml/min/1.73 m^2, p = 0.28).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Urology, Interforest Specialist Hospital, Warsaw, Poland.

ABSTRACT

Introduction: The traditional assessment of blood loss during laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (LRP) is based on the blood volume collected intraoperatively in the suction device bottles. While this method is not perfect, analysis of changes in blood cell count (BCC) resulting from LRP is advisable.

Material and methods: 71 men were submitted to LRP due to prostate cancer in our institution over an 18-month time period. From this group, we isolated 60 men with clinically minimal intraoperative blood loss (<200 ml) and included them into the study. Mean age of the cohort was 62.8 years. We performed standard BCC on the day before and 6 hours after the surgery. At the same time points, we measured creatinine serum concentration and calculated eGFR to avoid the data misinterpretation resulting from impaired renal function in the postoperative period.

Results: Statistically and clinically significant differences regarding all BCC parameters measured pre- and postoperatively were observed. The number of red blood cells, hemoglobin concentration, and hematocrit diminished by 17.5% (4.68T/l vs. 3.86T/l, p <0.02), 17.0% (8.93 mmol/l vs. 7.41 mmol/l, p < 0.02), and 17.9% (0.429 vs. 0.352, p <0.02), respectively. Simultaneously, renal function was stable with no significant change in eGFR (82.9 ml/min/1.73 m^2 vs. 79.09 ml/min/1.73 m^2, p = 0.28).

Conclusions: Standard LRP brings on a significant blood loss. While clinically insignificant, this blood loss seems to be as high as approx. 600 ml based on laboratory findings. BCC seems to be a more accurate method of intraoperative blood loss estimation compared to measurement of blood volume collected intraoperatively in the suction device bottles.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus