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Outcome of surgery in locally advanced pT3a prostate cancer.

Milonas D, Baltrimavicius R, Grybas A, Gudinaviciene I, Trumbeckas D, Kincius M, Auskalnis S, Jievaltas M - Cent European J Urol (2011)

Bottom Line: Survival was different when comparing surgery Gleason score ≤7 and ≥8. 5-year OS and BPFS were 98% vs. 80%, and 62.6% vs. 27.3%, respectively.Specimen Gleason score and preoperative PSA were significant predictors of BPFS.In locally advanced pT3 PCa, surgery can yield very good cancer control and survival rates especially in cases with PSA <10 ng/ml and Gleason score ≤7.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Lithuanian Health Science University, Department of Urology, Kaunas, Lithuania.

ABSTRACT

Introduction: The aim of this study is to present the oncologic outcomes and to determine prognostic parameters of overall (OS), cancer specific survival (CSS), disease progression free survival (DPFS) and biochemical progression free survival (BPFS) after surgery for pT3a prostate cancer (PCa).

Material and methods: Between 2002 and 2007, a pT3a stage after radical prostatectomy was detected in 126 patients at our institution. Kaplan-Meier analysis was used to calculate OS, CSS, DPFS and BPFS. Cox regression was used to identify predictive factors of survival.

Results: Five-year OS, CSS, DPFS and BPFS rates were 96%, 98.7%, 97.3% and 60%, respectively. Among patients with prostate specific antigen (PSA) <10 ng/ml and PSA >20 ng/ml the 5-year OS was 98.8% and 80%, respectively, whereas 5-year BPFS was 66% and 16.6%, respectively. Survival was different when comparing surgery Gleason score ≤7 and ≥8. 5-year OS and BPFS were 98% vs. 80%, and 62.6% vs. 27.3%, respectively. Specimen Gleason score and preoperative PSA were significant predictors of BPFS. The risk of biochemical progression increased up to 2-fold when a Gleason score ≥8 was present at final pathology.

Conclusions: In locally advanced pT3 PCa, surgery can yield very good cancer control and survival rates especially in cases with PSA <10 ng/ml and Gleason score ≤7. PSA and Gleason score after surgery are the most significant predictors of outcomes after radical prostatectomy.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Kaplan-Meier analysis for overall survival (A), disease progression free survival (B) and biochemical progression free survival (C) in all study patients.
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Figure 0001: Kaplan-Meier analysis for overall survival (A), disease progression free survival (B) and biochemical progression free survival (C) in all study patients.

Mentions: An overview of the patients’ preoperative and postoperative parameters is shown in Table 1. The median follow-up was 56 months (range 7-96). 5-year rates for OS, CSS and DPFS in our study cohort were 96%, 98.7% and 97.3%, respectively (Fig. 1A, B). Five-year BPFS was 60% (Fig. 1C). Cox regression analysis revealed that from all parameters (age, biopsy and surgery Gleason score, surgical margin and lymph nodes status, preoperative PSA level) only preoperative PSA (p = 0.037, HR 1.054, 95% CI 1.003-1.108) and postoperative Gleason score (p = 0.008, HR 2.05, 95% CI 1.202- 3.506) had an impact on biochemical relapse (Table 2). According Cox regression analysis, there were no parameters influencing overall and cancer specific mortality or disease progression.


Outcome of surgery in locally advanced pT3a prostate cancer.

Milonas D, Baltrimavicius R, Grybas A, Gudinaviciene I, Trumbeckas D, Kincius M, Auskalnis S, Jievaltas M - Cent European J Urol (2011)

Kaplan-Meier analysis for overall survival (A), disease progression free survival (B) and biochemical progression free survival (C) in all study patients.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3921749&req=5

Figure 0001: Kaplan-Meier analysis for overall survival (A), disease progression free survival (B) and biochemical progression free survival (C) in all study patients.
Mentions: An overview of the patients’ preoperative and postoperative parameters is shown in Table 1. The median follow-up was 56 months (range 7-96). 5-year rates for OS, CSS and DPFS in our study cohort were 96%, 98.7% and 97.3%, respectively (Fig. 1A, B). Five-year BPFS was 60% (Fig. 1C). Cox regression analysis revealed that from all parameters (age, biopsy and surgery Gleason score, surgical margin and lymph nodes status, preoperative PSA level) only preoperative PSA (p = 0.037, HR 1.054, 95% CI 1.003-1.108) and postoperative Gleason score (p = 0.008, HR 2.05, 95% CI 1.202- 3.506) had an impact on biochemical relapse (Table 2). According Cox regression analysis, there were no parameters influencing overall and cancer specific mortality or disease progression.

Bottom Line: Survival was different when comparing surgery Gleason score ≤7 and ≥8. 5-year OS and BPFS were 98% vs. 80%, and 62.6% vs. 27.3%, respectively.Specimen Gleason score and preoperative PSA were significant predictors of BPFS.In locally advanced pT3 PCa, surgery can yield very good cancer control and survival rates especially in cases with PSA <10 ng/ml and Gleason score ≤7.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Lithuanian Health Science University, Department of Urology, Kaunas, Lithuania.

ABSTRACT

Introduction: The aim of this study is to present the oncologic outcomes and to determine prognostic parameters of overall (OS), cancer specific survival (CSS), disease progression free survival (DPFS) and biochemical progression free survival (BPFS) after surgery for pT3a prostate cancer (PCa).

Material and methods: Between 2002 and 2007, a pT3a stage after radical prostatectomy was detected in 126 patients at our institution. Kaplan-Meier analysis was used to calculate OS, CSS, DPFS and BPFS. Cox regression was used to identify predictive factors of survival.

Results: Five-year OS, CSS, DPFS and BPFS rates were 96%, 98.7%, 97.3% and 60%, respectively. Among patients with prostate specific antigen (PSA) <10 ng/ml and PSA >20 ng/ml the 5-year OS was 98.8% and 80%, respectively, whereas 5-year BPFS was 66% and 16.6%, respectively. Survival was different when comparing surgery Gleason score ≤7 and ≥8. 5-year OS and BPFS were 98% vs. 80%, and 62.6% vs. 27.3%, respectively. Specimen Gleason score and preoperative PSA were significant predictors of BPFS. The risk of biochemical progression increased up to 2-fold when a Gleason score ≥8 was present at final pathology.

Conclusions: In locally advanced pT3 PCa, surgery can yield very good cancer control and survival rates especially in cases with PSA <10 ng/ml and Gleason score ≤7. PSA and Gleason score after surgery are the most significant predictors of outcomes after radical prostatectomy.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus