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Hemoperitoneum secondary to bleeding of a hepatic metastasis of testicular carcinoma.

Astroza G, Espínola D, Faundes V, Calderón J - Cent European J Urol (2011)

Bottom Line: Hepatic compromise is rare and is associated with poor prognosis.Besides this, hepatic lesions can complicate with necrosis and overgrowth, a phenomenon that is mainly seen in primary lesions.Furthermore, bleeding of secondary lesions is very uncommon.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Emergency Department Hospital Ramón Barros Luco-Trudeau, Santiago, Chile.

ABSTRACT
Testicular cancer is the most common type of cancer among young patients. At the moment of diagnosis, between 30% and 50% of them have developed metastases, which affect retroperitoneal lymph nodes and lungs especially. Hepatic compromise is rare and is associated with poor prognosis. Besides this, hepatic lesions can complicate with necrosis and overgrowth, a phenomenon that is mainly seen in primary lesions. Furthermore, bleeding of secondary lesions is very uncommon. We present a case of a patient with massive hemoperitoneum secondary to rupture of hepatic metastatic lesions of a primary testicular tumor.

No MeSH data available.


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CT scan with retroperitoneal lesion.
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Figure 0003: CT scan with retroperitoneal lesion.

Mentions: A thirty-year-old male patient without comorbidities presented ambulatory for right testis enlargement, lower back pain, weight loss amounting to 4-kilograms, and a cough with bloody expectorant, during the last 2 months. He underwent testicular and abdominal ultrasonography, which revealed an atrophic right testis with an expansive, solid-cystic tumoral process with multiple calcifications (Fig. 1) and a retroperitoneal mass without focal hepatic lesions, respectively. Also tumoral markers were solicited whose results were LDH 629 UI, HCG 465728 mIU/ml, and AFP 1.4 ng/ml. Due to this, staging was carried out with chest, abdominal and pelvis CTs (Figs. 2, 3), which showed multiple hyperdense bilateral pulmonary nodules of a maximum diameter of 4-centimeters, three nodular images in hepatic segments IV and V, a heterogeneous retroperitoneal mass of a maximum diameter of 8-centimeters, and a mesenteric mass of a maximum diameter of 5-centimeters. The study was concluded with a brain CT that did not reveal brain metastases.


Hemoperitoneum secondary to bleeding of a hepatic metastasis of testicular carcinoma.

Astroza G, Espínola D, Faundes V, Calderón J - Cent European J Urol (2011)

CT scan with retroperitoneal lesion.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3921704&req=5

Figure 0003: CT scan with retroperitoneal lesion.
Mentions: A thirty-year-old male patient without comorbidities presented ambulatory for right testis enlargement, lower back pain, weight loss amounting to 4-kilograms, and a cough with bloody expectorant, during the last 2 months. He underwent testicular and abdominal ultrasonography, which revealed an atrophic right testis with an expansive, solid-cystic tumoral process with multiple calcifications (Fig. 1) and a retroperitoneal mass without focal hepatic lesions, respectively. Also tumoral markers were solicited whose results were LDH 629 UI, HCG 465728 mIU/ml, and AFP 1.4 ng/ml. Due to this, staging was carried out with chest, abdominal and pelvis CTs (Figs. 2, 3), which showed multiple hyperdense bilateral pulmonary nodules of a maximum diameter of 4-centimeters, three nodular images in hepatic segments IV and V, a heterogeneous retroperitoneal mass of a maximum diameter of 8-centimeters, and a mesenteric mass of a maximum diameter of 5-centimeters. The study was concluded with a brain CT that did not reveal brain metastases.

Bottom Line: Hepatic compromise is rare and is associated with poor prognosis.Besides this, hepatic lesions can complicate with necrosis and overgrowth, a phenomenon that is mainly seen in primary lesions.Furthermore, bleeding of secondary lesions is very uncommon.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Emergency Department Hospital Ramón Barros Luco-Trudeau, Santiago, Chile.

ABSTRACT
Testicular cancer is the most common type of cancer among young patients. At the moment of diagnosis, between 30% and 50% of them have developed metastases, which affect retroperitoneal lymph nodes and lungs especially. Hepatic compromise is rare and is associated with poor prognosis. Besides this, hepatic lesions can complicate with necrosis and overgrowth, a phenomenon that is mainly seen in primary lesions. Furthermore, bleeding of secondary lesions is very uncommon. We present a case of a patient with massive hemoperitoneum secondary to rupture of hepatic metastatic lesions of a primary testicular tumor.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus