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Sponge larval settlement cues: the role of microbial biofilms in a warming ocean.

Whalan S, Webster NS - Sci Rep (2014)

Bottom Line: Given the importance of habitat selection by the motile larval phase, understanding settlement choices is critical if we are to successfully predict the population dynamics of sessile adults.Microbial profiling of biofilms revealed different communities according to both age and temperature.Biofilm community composition, as a result of both elevated seawater temperature and biofilm age, contributed to settlement for sponge larvae with markedly higher numbers of larvae settling to biofilms developed over longer periods (10 d) and at temperatures 2-6°C above ambient.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Marine Ecology Research Centre, School of Environment Science & Engineering, Southern Cross University, PO Box 157, Lismore, NSW, 2470, Australia.

ABSTRACT
Microbial biofilms play important roles in initiating settlement of marine invertebrate larvae. Given the importance of habitat selection by the motile larval phase, understanding settlement choices is critical if we are to successfully predict the population dynamics of sessile adults. Marine microbial biofilms show remarkable variability in community composition, often mediated by environmental conditions and biofilm age. To determine if biofilm communities were influenced by the time allowed to establish (age) and/or seawater temperature, we manipulated experimental surfaces to firstly determine biofilm community composition and secondly test larval settlement responses for the abundant coral reef sponge Rhopaloeides odorabile. Microbial profiling of biofilms revealed different communities according to both age and temperature. Biofilm community composition, as a result of both elevated seawater temperature and biofilm age, contributed to settlement for sponge larvae with markedly higher numbers of larvae settling to biofilms developed over longer periods (10 d) and at temperatures 2-6°C above ambient.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Multidimensional scaling ordination of microbial community compositions from settlement surfaces developed at different ages, and temperatures, as analysed by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis.
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f3: Multidimensional scaling ordination of microbial community compositions from settlement surfaces developed at different ages, and temperatures, as analysed by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis.

Mentions: MDS analysis produced an ordination which clearly separated two distinct clusters (A & B-Fig. 3), where communities established at 10 d separated from newly established biofilms, irrespective of temperature. Within these two broad clusters there is evidence of gradients according to biofilm age and also temperature. For example, the cluster grouping 10 d biofilms (cluster A) also showed clear sub-groupings where biofilms at 34°C separated from biofilms developed at lower temperatures. While the patterns are less clear in cluster B, there was a weak gradient which distinguished 48 h biofilms according to temperature, where 34°C samples are grouped separately from the remainder of the 48 h temperature treatments.


Sponge larval settlement cues: the role of microbial biofilms in a warming ocean.

Whalan S, Webster NS - Sci Rep (2014)

Multidimensional scaling ordination of microbial community compositions from settlement surfaces developed at different ages, and temperatures, as analysed by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3921630&req=5

f3: Multidimensional scaling ordination of microbial community compositions from settlement surfaces developed at different ages, and temperatures, as analysed by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis.
Mentions: MDS analysis produced an ordination which clearly separated two distinct clusters (A & B-Fig. 3), where communities established at 10 d separated from newly established biofilms, irrespective of temperature. Within these two broad clusters there is evidence of gradients according to biofilm age and also temperature. For example, the cluster grouping 10 d biofilms (cluster A) also showed clear sub-groupings where biofilms at 34°C separated from biofilms developed at lower temperatures. While the patterns are less clear in cluster B, there was a weak gradient which distinguished 48 h biofilms according to temperature, where 34°C samples are grouped separately from the remainder of the 48 h temperature treatments.

Bottom Line: Given the importance of habitat selection by the motile larval phase, understanding settlement choices is critical if we are to successfully predict the population dynamics of sessile adults.Microbial profiling of biofilms revealed different communities according to both age and temperature.Biofilm community composition, as a result of both elevated seawater temperature and biofilm age, contributed to settlement for sponge larvae with markedly higher numbers of larvae settling to biofilms developed over longer periods (10 d) and at temperatures 2-6°C above ambient.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Marine Ecology Research Centre, School of Environment Science & Engineering, Southern Cross University, PO Box 157, Lismore, NSW, 2470, Australia.

ABSTRACT
Microbial biofilms play important roles in initiating settlement of marine invertebrate larvae. Given the importance of habitat selection by the motile larval phase, understanding settlement choices is critical if we are to successfully predict the population dynamics of sessile adults. Marine microbial biofilms show remarkable variability in community composition, often mediated by environmental conditions and biofilm age. To determine if biofilm communities were influenced by the time allowed to establish (age) and/or seawater temperature, we manipulated experimental surfaces to firstly determine biofilm community composition and secondly test larval settlement responses for the abundant coral reef sponge Rhopaloeides odorabile. Microbial profiling of biofilms revealed different communities according to both age and temperature. Biofilm community composition, as a result of both elevated seawater temperature and biofilm age, contributed to settlement for sponge larvae with markedly higher numbers of larvae settling to biofilms developed over longer periods (10 d) and at temperatures 2-6°C above ambient.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus