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Anti-stokes fluorescent probe with incoherent excitation.

Li Y, Zhou S, Dong G, Peng M, Wondraczek L, Qiu J - Sci Rep (2014)

Bottom Line: Although inorganic anti-Stokes fluorescent probes have long been developed, the operational mode of today's most advanced examples still involves the harsh requirement of coherent laser excitation, which often yields unexpected light disturbance or even photon-induced deterioration during optical imaging.We show that the probe can be operated under light-emitting diode excitation and provides tunable anti-Stokes energy shift and decay kinetics, which allow for rapid and deep tissue imaging over a very large area with negligible photodestruction.Charging of the probe can be achieved by either X-rays or ultraviolet-visible light irradiation, which enables multiplexed detection and function integration with standard X-ray medical imaging devices.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: State Key Laboratory of Luminescent Materials and Devices, Institute of Optical Communication Materials, School of Materials Science and Technology, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510640, China.

ABSTRACT
Although inorganic anti-Stokes fluorescent probes have long been developed, the operational mode of today's most advanced examples still involves the harsh requirement of coherent laser excitation, which often yields unexpected light disturbance or even photon-induced deterioration during optical imaging. Here, we demonstrate an efficient anti-Stokes fluorescent probe with incoherent excitation. We show that the probe can be operated under light-emitting diode excitation and provides tunable anti-Stokes energy shift and decay kinetics, which allow for rapid and deep tissue imaging over a very large area with negligible photodestruction. Charging of the probe can be achieved by either X-rays or ultraviolet-visible light irradiation, which enables multiplexed detection and function integration with standard X-ray medical imaging devices.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Anti-Stokes fluorescence tissues imaging of pork tissue with incoherent excitation.(a–c and g) show the application of ex situ optical charging, (d–f) represent X-ray in situ charging: (a) Pre-injection autofluorescence image. (b) 60 min post-injection fluorescence image and (c) representative reproduction of (b) after 1 on/off cycling. A 980 nm laser diode was employed as the excitation source and the monitoring wavelength was set at ~700 nm. (d) Post-injection autofluorescence image without charging. (e) Post-injection fluorescence image after external X-ray charging and (f) representative reproduction of (e) after 1 on/off cycling. (g) Deep and large-area fluorescence imaging of pork tissue for an injection depth of 1 cm. A 940 nm LED was employed as the excitation source for imaging and the monitoring wavelength was set at ~700 nm. Scale bars are 15 mm for panels a–g. (h) In-vitro viability of BMSCs (bone mesenchymal stem cells) incubated with particulate Zn3Ga2Ge2O10:0.5Cr3+ as anti-Stokes probe at different concentrations for 3 days. Each data point represents the mean value of at least three independent experiments.
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f5: Anti-Stokes fluorescence tissues imaging of pork tissue with incoherent excitation.(a–c and g) show the application of ex situ optical charging, (d–f) represent X-ray in situ charging: (a) Pre-injection autofluorescence image. (b) 60 min post-injection fluorescence image and (c) representative reproduction of (b) after 1 on/off cycling. A 980 nm laser diode was employed as the excitation source and the monitoring wavelength was set at ~700 nm. (d) Post-injection autofluorescence image without charging. (e) Post-injection fluorescence image after external X-ray charging and (f) representative reproduction of (e) after 1 on/off cycling. (g) Deep and large-area fluorescence imaging of pork tissue for an injection depth of 1 cm. A 940 nm LED was employed as the excitation source for imaging and the monitoring wavelength was set at ~700 nm. Scale bars are 15 mm for panels a–g. (h) In-vitro viability of BMSCs (bone mesenchymal stem cells) incubated with particulate Zn3Ga2Ge2O10:0.5Cr3+ as anti-Stokes probe at different concentrations for 3 days. Each data point represents the mean value of at least three independent experiments.

Mentions: The experimental demonstration of anti-Stokes luminescence imaging with incoherent excitation was performed by testing the visibility of the probe inside biological tissue. For that, fluorescence imaging was done by direct injection of disperse particles of Zn3Ga2Ge2O10:0.5Cr3+ into pork tissue. Charging was performed ex situ as well as in situ. Typical fluorescence micrographs are summarized in Figure 5. Figures 5 b–c represent exemplary images taken at the same sample location within a time window of 100 min for ex situ optical charging (Xenon short-arc lamp) of the probe. They clearly show the presence of the probe and its high optical stability which we find, within the observation timescale, in the range of the sensitivity of detection. External (in situ) X-ray activated and recharging of the probe is demonstrated in Figures 5d–f. The probe signal can also be clearly be distinguished from the autofluorescence of the tissue. This shows that the probe can be exploited for multiplexed excitation and detection. The combination of in situ and ex situ X-ray charging capability enables integration with established X-ray medical imaging techniques such as radiography and computed tomography.


Anti-stokes fluorescent probe with incoherent excitation.

Li Y, Zhou S, Dong G, Peng M, Wondraczek L, Qiu J - Sci Rep (2014)

Anti-Stokes fluorescence tissues imaging of pork tissue with incoherent excitation.(a–c and g) show the application of ex situ optical charging, (d–f) represent X-ray in situ charging: (a) Pre-injection autofluorescence image. (b) 60 min post-injection fluorescence image and (c) representative reproduction of (b) after 1 on/off cycling. A 980 nm laser diode was employed as the excitation source and the monitoring wavelength was set at ~700 nm. (d) Post-injection autofluorescence image without charging. (e) Post-injection fluorescence image after external X-ray charging and (f) representative reproduction of (e) after 1 on/off cycling. (g) Deep and large-area fluorescence imaging of pork tissue for an injection depth of 1 cm. A 940 nm LED was employed as the excitation source for imaging and the monitoring wavelength was set at ~700 nm. Scale bars are 15 mm for panels a–g. (h) In-vitro viability of BMSCs (bone mesenchymal stem cells) incubated with particulate Zn3Ga2Ge2O10:0.5Cr3+ as anti-Stokes probe at different concentrations for 3 days. Each data point represents the mean value of at least three independent experiments.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3921629&req=5

f5: Anti-Stokes fluorescence tissues imaging of pork tissue with incoherent excitation.(a–c and g) show the application of ex situ optical charging, (d–f) represent X-ray in situ charging: (a) Pre-injection autofluorescence image. (b) 60 min post-injection fluorescence image and (c) representative reproduction of (b) after 1 on/off cycling. A 980 nm laser diode was employed as the excitation source and the monitoring wavelength was set at ~700 nm. (d) Post-injection autofluorescence image without charging. (e) Post-injection fluorescence image after external X-ray charging and (f) representative reproduction of (e) after 1 on/off cycling. (g) Deep and large-area fluorescence imaging of pork tissue for an injection depth of 1 cm. A 940 nm LED was employed as the excitation source for imaging and the monitoring wavelength was set at ~700 nm. Scale bars are 15 mm for panels a–g. (h) In-vitro viability of BMSCs (bone mesenchymal stem cells) incubated with particulate Zn3Ga2Ge2O10:0.5Cr3+ as anti-Stokes probe at different concentrations for 3 days. Each data point represents the mean value of at least three independent experiments.
Mentions: The experimental demonstration of anti-Stokes luminescence imaging with incoherent excitation was performed by testing the visibility of the probe inside biological tissue. For that, fluorescence imaging was done by direct injection of disperse particles of Zn3Ga2Ge2O10:0.5Cr3+ into pork tissue. Charging was performed ex situ as well as in situ. Typical fluorescence micrographs are summarized in Figure 5. Figures 5 b–c represent exemplary images taken at the same sample location within a time window of 100 min for ex situ optical charging (Xenon short-arc lamp) of the probe. They clearly show the presence of the probe and its high optical stability which we find, within the observation timescale, in the range of the sensitivity of detection. External (in situ) X-ray activated and recharging of the probe is demonstrated in Figures 5d–f. The probe signal can also be clearly be distinguished from the autofluorescence of the tissue. This shows that the probe can be exploited for multiplexed excitation and detection. The combination of in situ and ex situ X-ray charging capability enables integration with established X-ray medical imaging techniques such as radiography and computed tomography.

Bottom Line: Although inorganic anti-Stokes fluorescent probes have long been developed, the operational mode of today's most advanced examples still involves the harsh requirement of coherent laser excitation, which often yields unexpected light disturbance or even photon-induced deterioration during optical imaging.We show that the probe can be operated under light-emitting diode excitation and provides tunable anti-Stokes energy shift and decay kinetics, which allow for rapid and deep tissue imaging over a very large area with negligible photodestruction.Charging of the probe can be achieved by either X-rays or ultraviolet-visible light irradiation, which enables multiplexed detection and function integration with standard X-ray medical imaging devices.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: State Key Laboratory of Luminescent Materials and Devices, Institute of Optical Communication Materials, School of Materials Science and Technology, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510640, China.

ABSTRACT
Although inorganic anti-Stokes fluorescent probes have long been developed, the operational mode of today's most advanced examples still involves the harsh requirement of coherent laser excitation, which often yields unexpected light disturbance or even photon-induced deterioration during optical imaging. Here, we demonstrate an efficient anti-Stokes fluorescent probe with incoherent excitation. We show that the probe can be operated under light-emitting diode excitation and provides tunable anti-Stokes energy shift and decay kinetics, which allow for rapid and deep tissue imaging over a very large area with negligible photodestruction. Charging of the probe can be achieved by either X-rays or ultraviolet-visible light irradiation, which enables multiplexed detection and function integration with standard X-ray medical imaging devices.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus