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A Pilot Feasibility Study of Whole-systems Ayurvedic Medicine and Yoga Therapy for Weight Loss.

Rioux J, Thomson C, Howerter A - Glob Adv Health Med (2014)

Bottom Line: A comprehensive diet, activity, and lifestyle modification program based on principles of Ayurvedic medicine/yoga therapy with significant self-monitoring of lifestyle behaviors.Abstract available from the publisher.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Internal Medicine, University of New Mexico, School of Medicine, Albuquerque (Dr Rioux), United States.

ABSTRACT

Objective: To develop and test the feasibility of a whole-systems lifestyle intervention for obesity treatment based on the practices of Ayurvedic medicine/ Yoga therapy.

Design: A pre-post weight loss intervention pilot study using conventional and Ayurvedic diagnosis inclusion criteria, tailored treatment within a standardized treatment algorithm, and standardized data collection instruments for collecting Ayurvedic outcomes.

Participants: A convenience sample of overweight/obese adult community members from Tucson, Arizona interested in a "holistic weight loss program" and meeting predetermined inclusion/exclusion criteria.

Intervention: A comprehensive diet, activity, and lifestyle modification program based on principles of Ayurvedic medicine/yoga therapy with significant self-monitoring of lifestyle behaviors. The 3-month program was designed to change eating and activity patterns and to improve self-efficacy, quality of life, well-being, vitality, and self-awareness around food choices, stress management, and barriers to weight loss.

Primary outcome measures: Changes in body weight, body mass index; body fat percentage, fat/lean mass, waist/hip circumference and ratio, and blood pressure.

Secondary outcome measures: Diet and exercise self-efficacy scales; perceived stress scale; visual analog scales (VAS) of energy, appetite, stress, quality of life, well-being, and program satisfaction at all time points.

Results: Twenty-two adults attended an in-person Ayurvedic screening; 17 initiated the intervention, and 12 completed the 3-month intervention. Twelve completed follow-up at 6 months and 11 completed follow-up at 9 months. Mean weight loss at 3 months was 3.54 kg (SD 4.76); 6 months: 4.63 kg, (SD 6.23) and 9 months: 5.9 kg (SD 8.52). Self-report of program satisfaction was more than 90% at all time points.

Conclusions: An Ayurveda-/yoga-based lifestyle modification program is an acceptable and feasible approach to weight management. Data collection, including self-monitoring and conventional and Ayurvedic outcomes, did not unduly burden participants, with attrition similar to that of other weight loss studies.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Recruitment flowchart.Abbreviation: BMI, body mass index.
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Related In: Results  -  Collection


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Figure 1: Recruitment flowchart.Abbreviation: BMI, body mass index.

Mentions: Participants were recruited by postings to university-affiliated listservs, including community health clinics and some public school settings; on television monitors in public areas of the university hospital; and through print fliers at university clinics. Twenty-two individuals attended an in-person screening for Ayurvedic diagnosis that required consent. Five refused the study, 17 began the intervention with all 17 doing the same yoga sequence, and 12 completed the 3-month program. The total sample of 12 ranged in age from 22 to 68 years, with 11 females and one male (Figure 1).


A Pilot Feasibility Study of Whole-systems Ayurvedic Medicine and Yoga Therapy for Weight Loss.

Rioux J, Thomson C, Howerter A - Glob Adv Health Med (2014)

Recruitment flowchart.Abbreviation: BMI, body mass index.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3921615&req=5

Figure 1: Recruitment flowchart.Abbreviation: BMI, body mass index.
Mentions: Participants were recruited by postings to university-affiliated listservs, including community health clinics and some public school settings; on television monitors in public areas of the university hospital; and through print fliers at university clinics. Twenty-two individuals attended an in-person screening for Ayurvedic diagnosis that required consent. Five refused the study, 17 began the intervention with all 17 doing the same yoga sequence, and 12 completed the 3-month program. The total sample of 12 ranged in age from 22 to 68 years, with 11 females and one male (Figure 1).

Bottom Line: A comprehensive diet, activity, and lifestyle modification program based on principles of Ayurvedic medicine/yoga therapy with significant self-monitoring of lifestyle behaviors.Abstract available from the publisher.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Internal Medicine, University of New Mexico, School of Medicine, Albuquerque (Dr Rioux), United States.

ABSTRACT

Objective: To develop and test the feasibility of a whole-systems lifestyle intervention for obesity treatment based on the practices of Ayurvedic medicine/ Yoga therapy.

Design: A pre-post weight loss intervention pilot study using conventional and Ayurvedic diagnosis inclusion criteria, tailored treatment within a standardized treatment algorithm, and standardized data collection instruments for collecting Ayurvedic outcomes.

Participants: A convenience sample of overweight/obese adult community members from Tucson, Arizona interested in a "holistic weight loss program" and meeting predetermined inclusion/exclusion criteria.

Intervention: A comprehensive diet, activity, and lifestyle modification program based on principles of Ayurvedic medicine/yoga therapy with significant self-monitoring of lifestyle behaviors. The 3-month program was designed to change eating and activity patterns and to improve self-efficacy, quality of life, well-being, vitality, and self-awareness around food choices, stress management, and barriers to weight loss.

Primary outcome measures: Changes in body weight, body mass index; body fat percentage, fat/lean mass, waist/hip circumference and ratio, and blood pressure.

Secondary outcome measures: Diet and exercise self-efficacy scales; perceived stress scale; visual analog scales (VAS) of energy, appetite, stress, quality of life, well-being, and program satisfaction at all time points.

Results: Twenty-two adults attended an in-person Ayurvedic screening; 17 initiated the intervention, and 12 completed the 3-month intervention. Twelve completed follow-up at 6 months and 11 completed follow-up at 9 months. Mean weight loss at 3 months was 3.54 kg (SD 4.76); 6 months: 4.63 kg, (SD 6.23) and 9 months: 5.9 kg (SD 8.52). Self-report of program satisfaction was more than 90% at all time points.

Conclusions: An Ayurveda-/yoga-based lifestyle modification program is an acceptable and feasible approach to weight management. Data collection, including self-monitoring and conventional and Ayurvedic outcomes, did not unduly burden participants, with attrition similar to that of other weight loss studies.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus