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Meet the Fribbles: novel stimuli for use within behavioural research.

Barry TJ, Griffith JW, De Rossi S, Hermans D - Front Psychol (2014)

Bottom Line: They also have known properties that can be experimentally manipulated.We present an investigation into similarity between Fribbles in order to illustrate their utility in research that relies on comparisons between similar stimuli.Fribbles offer both experimental control and generalisability to the real world, although some consideration must be made concerning the properties that influence similarity between Fribbles when selecting them along a dimension of similarity.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Centre for the Psychology of Learning and Experimental Psychopathology, Faculty of Psychology and Educational Sciences, University of Leuven Leuven, Belgium.

ABSTRACT
Clinical researchers make use of experimental models for mental disorders. In many cases, these models use stimuli that are relevant to the disorder under scrutiny, which allows one to experimentally investigate the factors that contribute to the development of the disorder. For example, one might use spiders or spider-like stimuli in the study of specific phobia. More broadly, researchers often make use of real-world stimuli such as images of animals, geometrical shapes or emotional words. However, these stimuli are often limited in their experimental controllability and their applicability to the disorder in question. We present a novel set of animal-like stimuli, called Fribbles, for use within behavioural research. Fribbles have desirable properties for use in research because they are similar to real-world stimuli, but due to their novelty, participants will not have had previous experience with them. They also have known properties that can be experimentally manipulated. We present an investigation into similarity between Fribbles in order to illustrate their utility in research that relies on comparisons between similar stimuli. Fribbles offer both experimental control and generalisability to the real world, although some consideration must be made concerning the properties that influence similarity between Fribbles when selecting them along a dimension of similarity.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Mean similarity ratings for exemplar Fribbles for each possible configuration of elements in common with the prototype Fribble for both species FA1 and FC1. Similarity was scored on a scale ranging from 1 to 20 where “1” represented a highly dissimilar stimulus and “20” a highly similar stimulus. Higher means scores indicate greater similarity with the prototype. Error bars are one standard deviation.
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Figure 2: Mean similarity ratings for exemplar Fribbles for each possible configuration of elements in common with the prototype Fribble for both species FA1 and FC1. Similarity was scored on a scale ranging from 1 to 20 where “1” represented a highly dissimilar stimulus and “20” a highly similar stimulus. Higher means scores indicate greater similarity with the prototype. Error bars are one standard deviation.

Mentions: In order to investigate the influence of the number of common elements shared between an exemplar and the prototype on similarity judgements, we performed a repeated-measures ANOVA with two within-subjects variables: elements in Common, (four levels; one, two, three, or four elements in common with the exemplar) and Species (two levels; FA1 and FC1) (see Figure 2 for results). This showed a main effect of the number of common elements on similarity ratings and the eta squared (η2) value suggested that a large proportion of the variance in similarity ratings was explained by the number of common elements, F(3,123) = 150.12, p < 0.001, partial η2 = 0.79. Planned orthogonal polynomial contrasts showed a significant linear effect for these differences in similarity judgements, F(1,41) = 177.07, p < 0.001, and there was also a significant quadratic effect, F(1,41) = 37.01, p < 0.001. Fribbles with more elements in common with the prototype were judged to be more similar than those with fewer elements in common although this similarity gradient showed slight curvature suggesting that there was less difference between similarity ratings for three and four elements in common than for other comparisons. Further, those with four elements in common were judged much more similar than those with other numbers of common elements. There was also a main effect of species, F(1,41) = 5.38, p < 0.05, partial η2 = 0.12, wherein, overall, the FA1 exemplars were more often judged to be more similar to the prototype than the FC1 exemplars to their prototype, although the size of this effect was small. However, there was not a significant common elements × species interaction, F(3,123) = 0.28, p > 0.05, partial η2 < 0.01, which shows that the effect of common elements on similarity judgements did not differ significantly between species. When asked post hoc what strategy they used to make their judgements, participants most often reported using the number of common elements and the shape and form of the elements to make their judgements.


Meet the Fribbles: novel stimuli for use within behavioural research.

Barry TJ, Griffith JW, De Rossi S, Hermans D - Front Psychol (2014)

Mean similarity ratings for exemplar Fribbles for each possible configuration of elements in common with the prototype Fribble for both species FA1 and FC1. Similarity was scored on a scale ranging from 1 to 20 where “1” represented a highly dissimilar stimulus and “20” a highly similar stimulus. Higher means scores indicate greater similarity with the prototype. Error bars are one standard deviation.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3921574&req=5

Figure 2: Mean similarity ratings for exemplar Fribbles for each possible configuration of elements in common with the prototype Fribble for both species FA1 and FC1. Similarity was scored on a scale ranging from 1 to 20 where “1” represented a highly dissimilar stimulus and “20” a highly similar stimulus. Higher means scores indicate greater similarity with the prototype. Error bars are one standard deviation.
Mentions: In order to investigate the influence of the number of common elements shared between an exemplar and the prototype on similarity judgements, we performed a repeated-measures ANOVA with two within-subjects variables: elements in Common, (four levels; one, two, three, or four elements in common with the exemplar) and Species (two levels; FA1 and FC1) (see Figure 2 for results). This showed a main effect of the number of common elements on similarity ratings and the eta squared (η2) value suggested that a large proportion of the variance in similarity ratings was explained by the number of common elements, F(3,123) = 150.12, p < 0.001, partial η2 = 0.79. Planned orthogonal polynomial contrasts showed a significant linear effect for these differences in similarity judgements, F(1,41) = 177.07, p < 0.001, and there was also a significant quadratic effect, F(1,41) = 37.01, p < 0.001. Fribbles with more elements in common with the prototype were judged to be more similar than those with fewer elements in common although this similarity gradient showed slight curvature suggesting that there was less difference between similarity ratings for three and four elements in common than for other comparisons. Further, those with four elements in common were judged much more similar than those with other numbers of common elements. There was also a main effect of species, F(1,41) = 5.38, p < 0.05, partial η2 = 0.12, wherein, overall, the FA1 exemplars were more often judged to be more similar to the prototype than the FC1 exemplars to their prototype, although the size of this effect was small. However, there was not a significant common elements × species interaction, F(3,123) = 0.28, p > 0.05, partial η2 < 0.01, which shows that the effect of common elements on similarity judgements did not differ significantly between species. When asked post hoc what strategy they used to make their judgements, participants most often reported using the number of common elements and the shape and form of the elements to make their judgements.

Bottom Line: They also have known properties that can be experimentally manipulated.We present an investigation into similarity between Fribbles in order to illustrate their utility in research that relies on comparisons between similar stimuli.Fribbles offer both experimental control and generalisability to the real world, although some consideration must be made concerning the properties that influence similarity between Fribbles when selecting them along a dimension of similarity.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Centre for the Psychology of Learning and Experimental Psychopathology, Faculty of Psychology and Educational Sciences, University of Leuven Leuven, Belgium.

ABSTRACT
Clinical researchers make use of experimental models for mental disorders. In many cases, these models use stimuli that are relevant to the disorder under scrutiny, which allows one to experimentally investigate the factors that contribute to the development of the disorder. For example, one might use spiders or spider-like stimuli in the study of specific phobia. More broadly, researchers often make use of real-world stimuli such as images of animals, geometrical shapes or emotional words. However, these stimuli are often limited in their experimental controllability and their applicability to the disorder in question. We present a novel set of animal-like stimuli, called Fribbles, for use within behavioural research. Fribbles have desirable properties for use in research because they are similar to real-world stimuli, but due to their novelty, participants will not have had previous experience with them. They also have known properties that can be experimentally manipulated. We present an investigation into similarity between Fribbles in order to illustrate their utility in research that relies on comparisons between similar stimuli. Fribbles offer both experimental control and generalisability to the real world, although some consideration must be made concerning the properties that influence similarity between Fribbles when selecting them along a dimension of similarity.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus