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Revision of the African genus Uvariastrum (Annonaceae).

Couvreur TL - PhytoKeys (2014)

Bottom Line: The genus is mainly found in the tropical lowland rain forests of Africa, with one species growing in a drier woodland habitat.The species name Uvariastrum pynaertii De Wild is reduced into synonymy with Uvariastrum zenkeri Engl. & Diels.Furthermore, all species are illustrated by line drawings and all species are mapped.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institut de Recherche pour le Développement, UMR-DIADE, BP 64501, F-34394 Montpellier cedex 5, France ; Université de Yaoundé I, Ecole Normale Supérieure, Département des Sciences Biologiques, Laboratoire de Botanique systématique et d'Ecologie, B.P. 047, Yaoundé, Cameroon ; Naturalis Biodiversity Center (section NHN), Wageningen University, Generaal Foulkesweg 37, 6703 BL, Wageningen, The Netherlands.

ABSTRACT
The genus Uvariastrum (Annonaceae) is restricted to continental Africa and is characterized by sepals with folded margins, few carpels and numerous stamens. The genus is mainly found in the tropical lowland rain forests of Africa, with one species growing in a drier woodland habitat. The species name Uvariastrum pynaertii De Wild is reduced into synonymy with Uvariastrum zenkeri Engl. & Diels. Uvaraistrum neglectum Paiva and Uvariastrum modestum Dielsare transferred to the genus Uvaria leading to two new combinations: Uvaria modesta (Diels) Couvreur, comb. nov. and Uvaria paivana Couvreur, nom. nov. Five species are currently recognized in Uvariastrum. The present revision, the first of the genus for over 100 years, provides an overview of previously published information and discussions on morphology, taxonomy and palynology. Preliminary conservation status assessments are provided for each species, as well as diagnostic keys for fruiting and flowering material as well as detailed species descriptions. Furthermore, all species are illustrated by line drawings and all species are mapped.

No MeSH data available.


Stamen and pollen morphology in Uvariastrum. a detail of connective shield in Uvariastrum insculptum (Breteler 5811) b pollen grain of Uvariastrum insculptum (Breteler 5811) c pollen grain of Uvariastrum germainii (Lebrun 5977) d pollen grain of Uvariastrum hexaloboides (Breteler 11894) e pollen grain of Uvariastrum zenkeri (Bos 6266) f Pollen grains of Uvariastrum zenkeri in connective shield (Bos 6266).
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Figure 3: Stamen and pollen morphology in Uvariastrum. a detail of connective shield in Uvariastrum insculptum (Breteler 5811) b pollen grain of Uvariastrum insculptum (Breteler 5811) c pollen grain of Uvariastrum germainii (Lebrun 5977) d pollen grain of Uvariastrum hexaloboides (Breteler 11894) e pollen grain of Uvariastrum zenkeri (Bos 6266) f Pollen grains of Uvariastrum zenkeri in connective shield (Bos 6266).

Mentions: The androecium has numerous extrose stamens conforming to the typical Annonaceae configuration (Fig. 2g). The disposition of anthers in Annonaceae flowers is still poorly known and more data is needed to better understand this (Endress and Armstrong 2011). The filaments are generally very short and wide. The connective is discoid, glabrous to densely pubescent; e.g., Uvariastrum insculptum (Fig. 3a). In Uvariastrum germainii the center of the connective is adorned by a protuberance termed umbonate (Maas et al. 2003) or tongue shaped, a character also found in other species like Uvaria angolensis Welw. ex Oliv. (Le Thomas 1969) and species of Annickia Setten & Maas (Versteegh and Sosef 2007) or Greenwayodendron Verdc. (Couvreur et al. 2009). Carpels are free, varying from 1–15 and are densely pubescent. The stigma is bilobed, or capitate in Uvariastrum pierreanum, and can be glabrous or pubescent. Ovules vary from 15 to numerous and are biseriate with a parietal placentation.


Revision of the African genus Uvariastrum (Annonaceae).

Couvreur TL - PhytoKeys (2014)

Stamen and pollen morphology in Uvariastrum. a detail of connective shield in Uvariastrum insculptum (Breteler 5811) b pollen grain of Uvariastrum insculptum (Breteler 5811) c pollen grain of Uvariastrum germainii (Lebrun 5977) d pollen grain of Uvariastrum hexaloboides (Breteler 11894) e pollen grain of Uvariastrum zenkeri (Bos 6266) f Pollen grains of Uvariastrum zenkeri in connective shield (Bos 6266).
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons-attribution
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3921557&req=5

Figure 3: Stamen and pollen morphology in Uvariastrum. a detail of connective shield in Uvariastrum insculptum (Breteler 5811) b pollen grain of Uvariastrum insculptum (Breteler 5811) c pollen grain of Uvariastrum germainii (Lebrun 5977) d pollen grain of Uvariastrum hexaloboides (Breteler 11894) e pollen grain of Uvariastrum zenkeri (Bos 6266) f Pollen grains of Uvariastrum zenkeri in connective shield (Bos 6266).
Mentions: The androecium has numerous extrose stamens conforming to the typical Annonaceae configuration (Fig. 2g). The disposition of anthers in Annonaceae flowers is still poorly known and more data is needed to better understand this (Endress and Armstrong 2011). The filaments are generally very short and wide. The connective is discoid, glabrous to densely pubescent; e.g., Uvariastrum insculptum (Fig. 3a). In Uvariastrum germainii the center of the connective is adorned by a protuberance termed umbonate (Maas et al. 2003) or tongue shaped, a character also found in other species like Uvaria angolensis Welw. ex Oliv. (Le Thomas 1969) and species of Annickia Setten & Maas (Versteegh and Sosef 2007) or Greenwayodendron Verdc. (Couvreur et al. 2009). Carpels are free, varying from 1–15 and are densely pubescent. The stigma is bilobed, or capitate in Uvariastrum pierreanum, and can be glabrous or pubescent. Ovules vary from 15 to numerous and are biseriate with a parietal placentation.

Bottom Line: The genus is mainly found in the tropical lowland rain forests of Africa, with one species growing in a drier woodland habitat.The species name Uvariastrum pynaertii De Wild is reduced into synonymy with Uvariastrum zenkeri Engl. & Diels.Furthermore, all species are illustrated by line drawings and all species are mapped.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institut de Recherche pour le Développement, UMR-DIADE, BP 64501, F-34394 Montpellier cedex 5, France ; Université de Yaoundé I, Ecole Normale Supérieure, Département des Sciences Biologiques, Laboratoire de Botanique systématique et d'Ecologie, B.P. 047, Yaoundé, Cameroon ; Naturalis Biodiversity Center (section NHN), Wageningen University, Generaal Foulkesweg 37, 6703 BL, Wageningen, The Netherlands.

ABSTRACT
The genus Uvariastrum (Annonaceae) is restricted to continental Africa and is characterized by sepals with folded margins, few carpels and numerous stamens. The genus is mainly found in the tropical lowland rain forests of Africa, with one species growing in a drier woodland habitat. The species name Uvariastrum pynaertii De Wild is reduced into synonymy with Uvariastrum zenkeri Engl. & Diels. Uvaraistrum neglectum Paiva and Uvariastrum modestum Dielsare transferred to the genus Uvaria leading to two new combinations: Uvaria modesta (Diels) Couvreur, comb. nov. and Uvaria paivana Couvreur, nom. nov. Five species are currently recognized in Uvariastrum. The present revision, the first of the genus for over 100 years, provides an overview of previously published information and discussions on morphology, taxonomy and palynology. Preliminary conservation status assessments are provided for each species, as well as diagnostic keys for fruiting and flowering material as well as detailed species descriptions. Furthermore, all species are illustrated by line drawings and all species are mapped.

No MeSH data available.