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Revision of the African genus Uvariastrum (Annonaceae).

Couvreur TL - PhytoKeys (2014)

Bottom Line: The genus is mainly found in the tropical lowland rain forests of Africa, with one species growing in a drier woodland habitat.The species name Uvariastrum pynaertii De Wild is reduced into synonymy with Uvariastrum zenkeri Engl. & Diels.Furthermore, all species are illustrated by line drawings and all species are mapped.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institut de Recherche pour le Développement, UMR-DIADE, BP 64501, F-34394 Montpellier cedex 5, France ; Université de Yaoundé I, Ecole Normale Supérieure, Département des Sciences Biologiques, Laboratoire de Botanique systématique et d'Ecologie, B.P. 047, Yaoundé, Cameroon ; Naturalis Biodiversity Center (section NHN), Wageningen University, Generaal Foulkesweg 37, 6703 BL, Wageningen, The Netherlands.

ABSTRACT
The genus Uvariastrum (Annonaceae) is restricted to continental Africa and is characterized by sepals with folded margins, few carpels and numerous stamens. The genus is mainly found in the tropical lowland rain forests of Africa, with one species growing in a drier woodland habitat. The species name Uvariastrum pynaertii De Wild is reduced into synonymy with Uvariastrum zenkeri Engl. & Diels. Uvaraistrum neglectum Paiva and Uvariastrum modestum Dielsare transferred to the genus Uvaria leading to two new combinations: Uvaria modesta (Diels) Couvreur, comb. nov. and Uvaria paivana Couvreur, nom. nov. Five species are currently recognized in Uvariastrum. The present revision, the first of the genus for over 100 years, provides an overview of previously published information and discussions on morphology, taxonomy and palynology. Preliminary conservation status assessments are provided for each species, as well as diagnostic keys for fruiting and flowering material as well as detailed species descriptions. Furthermore, all species are illustrated by line drawings and all species are mapped.

No MeSH data available.


Species of Uvariastrum. aUvariastrum insculptum, Ivory Coast (photo O. Lachenaud, no specimen) b Uvariastrum pierreanum, fruit, Gabon (photo: TLP Couvreur, (Sosef 2034)) cUvariastrum pierreanum, Cameroon (photo: TLP Couvreur; Couvreur 454) dUvariastrum zenkeri; cauliflorous flowers; Cameroon (photo: XM van der Burgt (van der Burgt 590)) eUvariastrum zenkeri, flower bud; Cameroon (photo Sonneck, no specimen) fUvariastrum zenkeri, mature flower; Cameroon (photo Sonneck, no specimen) gUvariastrum zenkeri, detail of receptacle; Cameroon (photo Sonneck, no specimen).
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Figure 2: Species of Uvariastrum. aUvariastrum insculptum, Ivory Coast (photo O. Lachenaud, no specimen) b Uvariastrum pierreanum, fruit, Gabon (photo: TLP Couvreur, (Sosef 2034)) cUvariastrum pierreanum, Cameroon (photo: TLP Couvreur; Couvreur 454) dUvariastrum zenkeri; cauliflorous flowers; Cameroon (photo: XM van der Burgt (van der Burgt 590)) eUvariastrum zenkeri, flower bud; Cameroon (photo Sonneck, no specimen) fUvariastrum zenkeri, mature flower; Cameroon (photo Sonneck, no specimen) gUvariastrum zenkeri, detail of receptacle; Cameroon (photo Sonneck, no specimen).

Mentions: The basic inflorescence type in Annonaceae is a thyrsoid (Weberling and Hoppe 1996): a cymosely branched partial inflorescence on a multinodate main axis, ending in a terminal flower (determinate). This sort of inflorescence is also called a rhipidium. In Uvariastrum, the inflorescences are defined as a single-flowered rhipidium developing from the axillary meristem similar in structure to those of Isolona (Couvreur 2009). Sometimes additional single flowered rhipidia develop from extra-axillary meristems. In Uvariastrum zenkeri, Uvariastrum pierreanum, and to a lesser extent in Uvariastrum hexaloboides, cauliflory has been observed in which case there are numerous clustered flowers on main stems (Fig. 2d). The bracts vary from 1–3 being semi-amplectent on the petiole and caducous. They are generally small varying from 1–10 mm in length. Large leaf-like bracts, like for example those in Isolona cauliflora Verdc., have not been recorded in the genus.


Revision of the African genus Uvariastrum (Annonaceae).

Couvreur TL - PhytoKeys (2014)

Species of Uvariastrum. aUvariastrum insculptum, Ivory Coast (photo O. Lachenaud, no specimen) b Uvariastrum pierreanum, fruit, Gabon (photo: TLP Couvreur, (Sosef 2034)) cUvariastrum pierreanum, Cameroon (photo: TLP Couvreur; Couvreur 454) dUvariastrum zenkeri; cauliflorous flowers; Cameroon (photo: XM van der Burgt (van der Burgt 590)) eUvariastrum zenkeri, flower bud; Cameroon (photo Sonneck, no specimen) fUvariastrum zenkeri, mature flower; Cameroon (photo Sonneck, no specimen) gUvariastrum zenkeri, detail of receptacle; Cameroon (photo Sonneck, no specimen).
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons-attribution
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3921557&req=5

Figure 2: Species of Uvariastrum. aUvariastrum insculptum, Ivory Coast (photo O. Lachenaud, no specimen) b Uvariastrum pierreanum, fruit, Gabon (photo: TLP Couvreur, (Sosef 2034)) cUvariastrum pierreanum, Cameroon (photo: TLP Couvreur; Couvreur 454) dUvariastrum zenkeri; cauliflorous flowers; Cameroon (photo: XM van der Burgt (van der Burgt 590)) eUvariastrum zenkeri, flower bud; Cameroon (photo Sonneck, no specimen) fUvariastrum zenkeri, mature flower; Cameroon (photo Sonneck, no specimen) gUvariastrum zenkeri, detail of receptacle; Cameroon (photo Sonneck, no specimen).
Mentions: The basic inflorescence type in Annonaceae is a thyrsoid (Weberling and Hoppe 1996): a cymosely branched partial inflorescence on a multinodate main axis, ending in a terminal flower (determinate). This sort of inflorescence is also called a rhipidium. In Uvariastrum, the inflorescences are defined as a single-flowered rhipidium developing from the axillary meristem similar in structure to those of Isolona (Couvreur 2009). Sometimes additional single flowered rhipidia develop from extra-axillary meristems. In Uvariastrum zenkeri, Uvariastrum pierreanum, and to a lesser extent in Uvariastrum hexaloboides, cauliflory has been observed in which case there are numerous clustered flowers on main stems (Fig. 2d). The bracts vary from 1–3 being semi-amplectent on the petiole and caducous. They are generally small varying from 1–10 mm in length. Large leaf-like bracts, like for example those in Isolona cauliflora Verdc., have not been recorded in the genus.

Bottom Line: The genus is mainly found in the tropical lowland rain forests of Africa, with one species growing in a drier woodland habitat.The species name Uvariastrum pynaertii De Wild is reduced into synonymy with Uvariastrum zenkeri Engl. & Diels.Furthermore, all species are illustrated by line drawings and all species are mapped.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institut de Recherche pour le Développement, UMR-DIADE, BP 64501, F-34394 Montpellier cedex 5, France ; Université de Yaoundé I, Ecole Normale Supérieure, Département des Sciences Biologiques, Laboratoire de Botanique systématique et d'Ecologie, B.P. 047, Yaoundé, Cameroon ; Naturalis Biodiversity Center (section NHN), Wageningen University, Generaal Foulkesweg 37, 6703 BL, Wageningen, The Netherlands.

ABSTRACT
The genus Uvariastrum (Annonaceae) is restricted to continental Africa and is characterized by sepals with folded margins, few carpels and numerous stamens. The genus is mainly found in the tropical lowland rain forests of Africa, with one species growing in a drier woodland habitat. The species name Uvariastrum pynaertii De Wild is reduced into synonymy with Uvariastrum zenkeri Engl. & Diels. Uvaraistrum neglectum Paiva and Uvariastrum modestum Dielsare transferred to the genus Uvaria leading to two new combinations: Uvaria modesta (Diels) Couvreur, comb. nov. and Uvaria paivana Couvreur, nom. nov. Five species are currently recognized in Uvariastrum. The present revision, the first of the genus for over 100 years, provides an overview of previously published information and discussions on morphology, taxonomy and palynology. Preliminary conservation status assessments are provided for each species, as well as diagnostic keys for fruiting and flowering material as well as detailed species descriptions. Furthermore, all species are illustrated by line drawings and all species are mapped.

No MeSH data available.