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Revision of the African genus Uvariastrum (Annonaceae).

Couvreur TL - PhytoKeys (2014)

Bottom Line: The genus is mainly found in the tropical lowland rain forests of Africa, with one species growing in a drier woodland habitat.The species name Uvariastrum pynaertii De Wild is reduced into synonymy with Uvariastrum zenkeri Engl. & Diels.Furthermore, all species are illustrated by line drawings and all species are mapped.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institut de Recherche pour le Développement, UMR-DIADE, BP 64501, F-34394 Montpellier cedex 5, France ; Université de Yaoundé I, Ecole Normale Supérieure, Département des Sciences Biologiques, Laboratoire de Botanique systématique et d'Ecologie, B.P. 047, Yaoundé, Cameroon ; Naturalis Biodiversity Center (section NHN), Wageningen University, Generaal Foulkesweg 37, 6703 BL, Wageningen, The Netherlands.

ABSTRACT
The genus Uvariastrum (Annonaceae) is restricted to continental Africa and is characterized by sepals with folded margins, few carpels and numerous stamens. The genus is mainly found in the tropical lowland rain forests of Africa, with one species growing in a drier woodland habitat. The species name Uvariastrum pynaertii De Wild is reduced into synonymy with Uvariastrum zenkeri Engl. & Diels. Uvaraistrum neglectum Paiva and Uvariastrum modestum Dielsare transferred to the genus Uvaria leading to two new combinations: Uvaria modesta (Diels) Couvreur, comb. nov. and Uvaria paivana Couvreur, nom. nov. Five species are currently recognized in Uvariastrum. The present revision, the first of the genus for over 100 years, provides an overview of previously published information and discussions on morphology, taxonomy and palynology. Preliminary conservation status assessments are provided for each species, as well as diagnostic keys for fruiting and flowering material as well as detailed species descriptions. Furthermore, all species are illustrated by line drawings and all species are mapped.

No MeSH data available.


Leaf and petiole morphology in Uvariastrum. aUvariastrum zenkeri (Bergen 335, WAG) bUvariastrum pierreanum (Jongkind 7318, WAG) cUvariastrum insculptum (Staudt 740, M) dUvariastrum germainii (Ndolo Ebika 311, WAG) eUvariastrum hexaloboides (Schmitz 12046, WAG).
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Figure 1: Leaf and petiole morphology in Uvariastrum. aUvariastrum zenkeri (Bergen 335, WAG) bUvariastrum pierreanum (Jongkind 7318, WAG) cUvariastrum insculptum (Staudt 740, M) dUvariastrum germainii (Ndolo Ebika 311, WAG) eUvariastrum hexaloboides (Schmitz 12046, WAG).

Mentions: Uvariastrum are medium sized trees or shrubs as most of the members of the tribe Monodoreae. The trunks of Uvariastrum never present buttresses, can be fluted when old, but are generally straight and cylindrical. The phyllotaxis is distichous as usual for Annonaceae. The leaves show the typical Annonaceae pattern: they are simple, entire, distinctly petiolate, and exstipulate. Interestingly, leaves alone can be very useful for species identification (see key below and Fig. 1). Two species, Uvariastrum insculptum Sprague & Hutch. and Uvariastrum hexaloboides, have pubescent leaves, even in older individuals, especially along the upper side of the midrib. Besides their geographical disjunction, the former has clearly impressed venation above (Fig. 1C) and the latter has an emarginated leaf apex (Fig. 1E). The three other species of Uvariastrum can be distinguished by the size and shape of the leaves, the length of the petiole and the insertion of the lamina on the petiole. Uvariastrum zenkeri Engl. & Diels (Fig. 1A) has large leathery leaves and the lamina is inserted on top with a petiole length 2–4 mm long. Both Uvariastrum germainii Boutique and Uvariastrum pierreanum Engl. have the lamina inserted on the side and forming a groove, but the former (Fig. 1D) has characteristic small, long-apiculate leaves with long petioles (4–7 mm) whereas Uvariastrum pierreanum (Fig. 1B) has slightly longer leaves with a short apiculate apex and shorter petioles (2–4 mm). The midrib is sunken to flat on the upper side which is the common state for African Annonaceae. Only a few African genera (Isolona Engler, Monodora Dunaland Ophrypetalum Diels) have raised midribs which provides a useful taxonomical indication in sterile material (Couvreur 2009). The midrib is always prominent on the lower side. Secondary venation is brochidodromous, i.e. secondary veins joined together at the margins in a series of arches (loop-forming). On the upper side the venation is either raised (Uvariastrum germainii, Uvariastrum pierreanum), clearly impressed (Uvariastrum insculptum) or not very prominent (Uvariastrum hexaloiboides, Uvariastrum zenkeri). The tertiary venation is always reticulate.


Revision of the African genus Uvariastrum (Annonaceae).

Couvreur TL - PhytoKeys (2014)

Leaf and petiole morphology in Uvariastrum. aUvariastrum zenkeri (Bergen 335, WAG) bUvariastrum pierreanum (Jongkind 7318, WAG) cUvariastrum insculptum (Staudt 740, M) dUvariastrum germainii (Ndolo Ebika 311, WAG) eUvariastrum hexaloboides (Schmitz 12046, WAG).
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons-attribution
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3921557&req=5

Figure 1: Leaf and petiole morphology in Uvariastrum. aUvariastrum zenkeri (Bergen 335, WAG) bUvariastrum pierreanum (Jongkind 7318, WAG) cUvariastrum insculptum (Staudt 740, M) dUvariastrum germainii (Ndolo Ebika 311, WAG) eUvariastrum hexaloboides (Schmitz 12046, WAG).
Mentions: Uvariastrum are medium sized trees or shrubs as most of the members of the tribe Monodoreae. The trunks of Uvariastrum never present buttresses, can be fluted when old, but are generally straight and cylindrical. The phyllotaxis is distichous as usual for Annonaceae. The leaves show the typical Annonaceae pattern: they are simple, entire, distinctly petiolate, and exstipulate. Interestingly, leaves alone can be very useful for species identification (see key below and Fig. 1). Two species, Uvariastrum insculptum Sprague & Hutch. and Uvariastrum hexaloboides, have pubescent leaves, even in older individuals, especially along the upper side of the midrib. Besides their geographical disjunction, the former has clearly impressed venation above (Fig. 1C) and the latter has an emarginated leaf apex (Fig. 1E). The three other species of Uvariastrum can be distinguished by the size and shape of the leaves, the length of the petiole and the insertion of the lamina on the petiole. Uvariastrum zenkeri Engl. & Diels (Fig. 1A) has large leathery leaves and the lamina is inserted on top with a petiole length 2–4 mm long. Both Uvariastrum germainii Boutique and Uvariastrum pierreanum Engl. have the lamina inserted on the side and forming a groove, but the former (Fig. 1D) has characteristic small, long-apiculate leaves with long petioles (4–7 mm) whereas Uvariastrum pierreanum (Fig. 1B) has slightly longer leaves with a short apiculate apex and shorter petioles (2–4 mm). The midrib is sunken to flat on the upper side which is the common state for African Annonaceae. Only a few African genera (Isolona Engler, Monodora Dunaland Ophrypetalum Diels) have raised midribs which provides a useful taxonomical indication in sterile material (Couvreur 2009). The midrib is always prominent on the lower side. Secondary venation is brochidodromous, i.e. secondary veins joined together at the margins in a series of arches (loop-forming). On the upper side the venation is either raised (Uvariastrum germainii, Uvariastrum pierreanum), clearly impressed (Uvariastrum insculptum) or not very prominent (Uvariastrum hexaloiboides, Uvariastrum zenkeri). The tertiary venation is always reticulate.

Bottom Line: The genus is mainly found in the tropical lowland rain forests of Africa, with one species growing in a drier woodland habitat.The species name Uvariastrum pynaertii De Wild is reduced into synonymy with Uvariastrum zenkeri Engl. & Diels.Furthermore, all species are illustrated by line drawings and all species are mapped.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institut de Recherche pour le Développement, UMR-DIADE, BP 64501, F-34394 Montpellier cedex 5, France ; Université de Yaoundé I, Ecole Normale Supérieure, Département des Sciences Biologiques, Laboratoire de Botanique systématique et d'Ecologie, B.P. 047, Yaoundé, Cameroon ; Naturalis Biodiversity Center (section NHN), Wageningen University, Generaal Foulkesweg 37, 6703 BL, Wageningen, The Netherlands.

ABSTRACT
The genus Uvariastrum (Annonaceae) is restricted to continental Africa and is characterized by sepals with folded margins, few carpels and numerous stamens. The genus is mainly found in the tropical lowland rain forests of Africa, with one species growing in a drier woodland habitat. The species name Uvariastrum pynaertii De Wild is reduced into synonymy with Uvariastrum zenkeri Engl. & Diels. Uvaraistrum neglectum Paiva and Uvariastrum modestum Dielsare transferred to the genus Uvaria leading to two new combinations: Uvaria modesta (Diels) Couvreur, comb. nov. and Uvaria paivana Couvreur, nom. nov. Five species are currently recognized in Uvariastrum. The present revision, the first of the genus for over 100 years, provides an overview of previously published information and discussions on morphology, taxonomy and palynology. Preliminary conservation status assessments are provided for each species, as well as diagnostic keys for fruiting and flowering material as well as detailed species descriptions. Furthermore, all species are illustrated by line drawings and all species are mapped.

No MeSH data available.