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Advert saliency distracts children's visual attention during task-oriented internet use.

Holmberg N, Sandberg H, Holmqvist K - Front Psychol (2014)

Bottom Line: The results provide evidence about cognitive and behavioral distraction effects in children's task-oriented internet use caused by visual saliency in online adverts.The experiment suggests that children to some extent are able to compensate for behavioral effects caused by distracting visual stimuli when solving prospective memory tasks.Suggestions are given for further research into the interdiciplinary area between media research and cognitive science.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Communication and Media, Lund University Lund, Sweden ; Lund University Humanities Lab, Lund University Lund, Sweden.

ABSTRACT
The general research question of the present study was to assess the impact of visually salient online adverts on children's task-oriented internet use. In order to answer this question, an experimental study was constructed in which 9- and 12-year-old Swedish children were asked to solve a number of tasks while interacting with a mockup website. In each trial, web adverts in several saliency conditions were presented. By both measuring children's task accuracy, as well as the visual processing involved in solving these tasks, this study allows us to infer how two types of visual saliency affect children's attentional behavior, and whether such behavioral effects also impacts their task performance. Analyses show that low-level visual features and task relevance in online adverts have different effects on performance measures and process measures respectively. Whereas task performance is stable with regard to several advert saliency conditions, a marked effect is seen on children's gaze behavior. On the other hand, task performance is shown to be more sensitive to individual differences such as age, gender and level of gaze control. The results provide evidence about cognitive and behavioral distraction effects in children's task-oriented internet use caused by visual saliency in online adverts. The experiment suggests that children to some extent are able to compensate for behavioral effects caused by distracting visual stimuli when solving prospective memory tasks. Suggestions are given for further research into the interdiciplinary area between media research and cognitive science.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Advert onset speed and task relevance plotted against saccades to ads (left) and dwell time on ads (right).
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Figure 4: Advert onset speed and task relevance plotted against saccades to ads (left) and dwell time on ads (right).

Mentions: The distraction measures used in this study were dwell time on ads (attention retention) and saccades to ads (attention attraction). All 36 trials contained valid eye movement data for all 45 participants. The average fixation time on ads was just over half a second (654 ms), with no significant differences depending on age or gender. However, there was a significant negative effect of trial number, meaning that children tended to spend less time on experimental adverts toward the end of the experiment. The average number of saccades to ads was just over one saccade (1.13), and there was no significant differences depending on children's age or gender. As in the case of the previous distraction measure, there was a significantly negative effect of trial number, which would indicate that the children became less prone to behavioral distractions over the course of the experiment (as well as more proficient in solving the tasks). Figure 4 shows the effect of advert saliency conditions on task distraction.


Advert saliency distracts children's visual attention during task-oriented internet use.

Holmberg N, Sandberg H, Holmqvist K - Front Psychol (2014)

Advert onset speed and task relevance plotted against saccades to ads (left) and dwell time on ads (right).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3921552&req=5

Figure 4: Advert onset speed and task relevance plotted against saccades to ads (left) and dwell time on ads (right).
Mentions: The distraction measures used in this study were dwell time on ads (attention retention) and saccades to ads (attention attraction). All 36 trials contained valid eye movement data for all 45 participants. The average fixation time on ads was just over half a second (654 ms), with no significant differences depending on age or gender. However, there was a significant negative effect of trial number, meaning that children tended to spend less time on experimental adverts toward the end of the experiment. The average number of saccades to ads was just over one saccade (1.13), and there was no significant differences depending on children's age or gender. As in the case of the previous distraction measure, there was a significantly negative effect of trial number, which would indicate that the children became less prone to behavioral distractions over the course of the experiment (as well as more proficient in solving the tasks). Figure 4 shows the effect of advert saliency conditions on task distraction.

Bottom Line: The results provide evidence about cognitive and behavioral distraction effects in children's task-oriented internet use caused by visual saliency in online adverts.The experiment suggests that children to some extent are able to compensate for behavioral effects caused by distracting visual stimuli when solving prospective memory tasks.Suggestions are given for further research into the interdiciplinary area between media research and cognitive science.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Communication and Media, Lund University Lund, Sweden ; Lund University Humanities Lab, Lund University Lund, Sweden.

ABSTRACT
The general research question of the present study was to assess the impact of visually salient online adverts on children's task-oriented internet use. In order to answer this question, an experimental study was constructed in which 9- and 12-year-old Swedish children were asked to solve a number of tasks while interacting with a mockup website. In each trial, web adverts in several saliency conditions were presented. By both measuring children's task accuracy, as well as the visual processing involved in solving these tasks, this study allows us to infer how two types of visual saliency affect children's attentional behavior, and whether such behavioral effects also impacts their task performance. Analyses show that low-level visual features and task relevance in online adverts have different effects on performance measures and process measures respectively. Whereas task performance is stable with regard to several advert saliency conditions, a marked effect is seen on children's gaze behavior. On the other hand, task performance is shown to be more sensitive to individual differences such as age, gender and level of gaze control. The results provide evidence about cognitive and behavioral distraction effects in children's task-oriented internet use caused by visual saliency in online adverts. The experiment suggests that children to some extent are able to compensate for behavioral effects caused by distracting visual stimuli when solving prospective memory tasks. Suggestions are given for further research into the interdiciplinary area between media research and cognitive science.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus