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Comparison of nutrient intake and diet quality between hyperuricemia subjects and controls in Korea.

Ryu KA, Kang HH, Kim SY, Yoo MK, Kim JS, Lee CH, Wie GA - Clin Nutr Res (2014)

Bottom Line: Of the 28,589 people who participated in a health examination between 2008 and 2011, 9,010 subjects were selected whose 3-day food records were available.Body mass index, waist circumference, triglycerides, total cholesterol, and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol were significantly higher (p < 0.0001), while high-density cholesterol (p < 0.001) was significantly lower in the hyperuricemia subjects than in the controls.The FHS (p < 0.0001), MAR (p < 0.0001), and NARs for vitamin A (p = 0.01), vitamin B2, vitamin C, folate, and calcium (p < 0.0001) were significantly lower in the hyperuricemia subjects than in the controls.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Clinical Nutrition, National Cancer Center, Goyang 410-769, South Korea.

ABSTRACT
Hyperuricemia is associated with metabolic syndrome as well as gout, and the prevalence of hyperuricemia is increasing in Korea. This study aimed to compare the nutrient intake and diet quality between hyperuricemia subjects and controls. Of the 28,589 people who participated in a health examination between 2008 and 2011, 9,010 subjects were selected whose 3-day food records were available. Clinical and laboratory data were collected from electronic medical records. Diet quality was evaluated using the food habit score (FHS), nutrient adequacy ratio (NAR), and mean adequacy ratio (MAR). The prevalence of hyperuricemia was 13.8% (27.1%, men; 5.2%, women). Body mass index, waist circumference, triglycerides, total cholesterol, and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol were significantly higher (p < 0.0001), while high-density cholesterol (p < 0.001) was significantly lower in the hyperuricemia subjects than in the controls. The hyperuricemia subjects had a lower intake of vitamin A (p < 0.004), vitamin C, folate, fiber, and calcium than the controls (p < 0.0001). Intake of vegetables and dairy products was significantly lower, whereas alcohol intake was significantly higher in the hyperuricemia subjects than in the controls ( p < 0.0001). The FHS (p < 0.0001), MAR (p < 0.0001), and NARs for vitamin A (p = 0.01), vitamin B2, vitamin C, folate, and calcium (p < 0.0001) were significantly lower in the hyperuricemia subjects than in the controls. In conclusion, the hyperuricemia subjects reported poorer diet quality than the controls, including higher alcohol intake and lower vegetable and dairy product intake.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Inclusion and exclusion criteria for the study subjects. *Visitors for health examination survey from January 1, 2008 to December 31, 2011; †Hyperuricemia was defined as serum uric acid concentration ≥7 mg/dL in men, and ≥6 mg/dL in women [16].
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Figure 1: Inclusion and exclusion criteria for the study subjects. *Visitors for health examination survey from January 1, 2008 to December 31, 2011; †Hyperuricemia was defined as serum uric acid concentration ≥7 mg/dL in men, and ≥6 mg/dL in women [16].

Mentions: This cross-sectional study compared nutritional intake and quality between hyperuricemia subjects and controls. Of the 28,589 subjects who underwent health examination between January 2008 and December 2011, those that completed a self-administered questionnaire, laboratory tests, and a complete 3-day food record were included. Subjects were excluded who reported an unrealistic daily energy intake (<500 kcal or ≥3,500 kcal). This resulted in 9,010 subjects in the final analysis (Figure 1).


Comparison of nutrient intake and diet quality between hyperuricemia subjects and controls in Korea.

Ryu KA, Kang HH, Kim SY, Yoo MK, Kim JS, Lee CH, Wie GA - Clin Nutr Res (2014)

Inclusion and exclusion criteria for the study subjects. *Visitors for health examination survey from January 1, 2008 to December 31, 2011; †Hyperuricemia was defined as serum uric acid concentration ≥7 mg/dL in men, and ≥6 mg/dL in women [16].
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3921296&req=5

Figure 1: Inclusion and exclusion criteria for the study subjects. *Visitors for health examination survey from January 1, 2008 to December 31, 2011; †Hyperuricemia was defined as serum uric acid concentration ≥7 mg/dL in men, and ≥6 mg/dL in women [16].
Mentions: This cross-sectional study compared nutritional intake and quality between hyperuricemia subjects and controls. Of the 28,589 subjects who underwent health examination between January 2008 and December 2011, those that completed a self-administered questionnaire, laboratory tests, and a complete 3-day food record were included. Subjects were excluded who reported an unrealistic daily energy intake (<500 kcal or ≥3,500 kcal). This resulted in 9,010 subjects in the final analysis (Figure 1).

Bottom Line: Of the 28,589 people who participated in a health examination between 2008 and 2011, 9,010 subjects were selected whose 3-day food records were available.Body mass index, waist circumference, triglycerides, total cholesterol, and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol were significantly higher (p < 0.0001), while high-density cholesterol (p < 0.001) was significantly lower in the hyperuricemia subjects than in the controls.The FHS (p < 0.0001), MAR (p < 0.0001), and NARs for vitamin A (p = 0.01), vitamin B2, vitamin C, folate, and calcium (p < 0.0001) were significantly lower in the hyperuricemia subjects than in the controls.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Clinical Nutrition, National Cancer Center, Goyang 410-769, South Korea.

ABSTRACT
Hyperuricemia is associated with metabolic syndrome as well as gout, and the prevalence of hyperuricemia is increasing in Korea. This study aimed to compare the nutrient intake and diet quality between hyperuricemia subjects and controls. Of the 28,589 people who participated in a health examination between 2008 and 2011, 9,010 subjects were selected whose 3-day food records were available. Clinical and laboratory data were collected from electronic medical records. Diet quality was evaluated using the food habit score (FHS), nutrient adequacy ratio (NAR), and mean adequacy ratio (MAR). The prevalence of hyperuricemia was 13.8% (27.1%, men; 5.2%, women). Body mass index, waist circumference, triglycerides, total cholesterol, and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol were significantly higher (p < 0.0001), while high-density cholesterol (p < 0.001) was significantly lower in the hyperuricemia subjects than in the controls. The hyperuricemia subjects had a lower intake of vitamin A (p < 0.004), vitamin C, folate, fiber, and calcium than the controls (p < 0.0001). Intake of vegetables and dairy products was significantly lower, whereas alcohol intake was significantly higher in the hyperuricemia subjects than in the controls ( p < 0.0001). The FHS (p < 0.0001), MAR (p < 0.0001), and NARs for vitamin A (p = 0.01), vitamin B2, vitamin C, folate, and calcium (p < 0.0001) were significantly lower in the hyperuricemia subjects than in the controls. In conclusion, the hyperuricemia subjects reported poorer diet quality than the controls, including higher alcohol intake and lower vegetable and dairy product intake.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus