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Migration and coiling of peritoneal catheter into the subgaleal space: a very rare complication of subgaleoperitoneal shunt.

Yee GT, Han SR, Choi CY - J Korean Neurosurg Soc (2013)

Bottom Line: A 32-year-old male patient visited our hospital presenting with a large skull defect due to a prior craniectomy performed elsewhere.Six months later, the patient presented with progressive scalp swelling.We would like to report our experience with a very rare complication of subgaleo-peritoneal shunting.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Neurosurgery, Gil Medical Center, Gachon University, Incheon, Korea.

ABSTRACT
Upward migration of the peritoneal catheter of a subgaleo-peritoneal (SP) shunt and coiling into the subgaleal space is an extremely rare complication of a SP shunt. A 32-year-old male patient visited our hospital presenting with a large skull defect due to a prior craniectomy performed elsewhere. The patient underwent a cranioplasty with methylmetacrylate, but subsequently developed progressive pseudomeningocele and subgaleal cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) collection. The patient underwent CSF diversion via a SP shunt. After SP shunting, the pseudomeningocele disappeared completely. Six months later, the patient presented with progressive scalp swelling. Skull X-ray showed migration and coiling of the distal catheter of the SP shunt. The patient was treated by removing the entire shunt catheter and the dura was covered with a subgaleal flap. We would like to report our experience with a very rare complication of subgaleo-peritoneal shunting.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Brain computed tomography demonstrates that pseudomeningocele is disappeared.
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Figure 4: Brain computed tomography demonstrates that pseudomeningocele is disappeared.


Migration and coiling of peritoneal catheter into the subgaleal space: a very rare complication of subgaleoperitoneal shunt.

Yee GT, Han SR, Choi CY - J Korean Neurosurg Soc (2013)

Brain computed tomography demonstrates that pseudomeningocele is disappeared.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3921284&req=5

Figure 4: Brain computed tomography demonstrates that pseudomeningocele is disappeared.
Bottom Line: A 32-year-old male patient visited our hospital presenting with a large skull defect due to a prior craniectomy performed elsewhere.Six months later, the patient presented with progressive scalp swelling.We would like to report our experience with a very rare complication of subgaleo-peritoneal shunting.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Neurosurgery, Gil Medical Center, Gachon University, Incheon, Korea.

ABSTRACT
Upward migration of the peritoneal catheter of a subgaleo-peritoneal (SP) shunt and coiling into the subgaleal space is an extremely rare complication of a SP shunt. A 32-year-old male patient visited our hospital presenting with a large skull defect due to a prior craniectomy performed elsewhere. The patient underwent a cranioplasty with methylmetacrylate, but subsequently developed progressive pseudomeningocele and subgaleal cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) collection. The patient underwent CSF diversion via a SP shunt. After SP shunting, the pseudomeningocele disappeared completely. Six months later, the patient presented with progressive scalp swelling. Skull X-ray showed migration and coiling of the distal catheter of the SP shunt. The patient was treated by removing the entire shunt catheter and the dura was covered with a subgaleal flap. We would like to report our experience with a very rare complication of subgaleo-peritoneal shunting.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus