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Multiple spinal cord recurrences of an intracranial ependymoma after 14 years.

Hong S, Choe WJ, Moon CT - J Korean Neurosurg Soc (2013)

Bottom Line: Ependymoma can spread via cerebrospinal fluid, but late spinal recurrences of intracranial tumor are very rare.We describe a case of a 33-year-old male who presented with multiple, delayed, recurrent lesions in the spinal cord from an intracranial ependymoma.The large thoraco-lumbar intradural-extramedullary spinal cord tumor was surgically removed and the pathologic diagnosis was an anaplastic ependymoma.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Radiation Oncology, Konkuk University School of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.

ABSTRACT
Ependymoma can spread via cerebrospinal fluid, but late spinal recurrences of intracranial tumor are very rare. We describe a case of a 33-year-old male who presented with multiple, delayed, recurrent lesions in the spinal cord from an intracranial ependymoma. The patient underwent gross total resection and postoperative radiation therapy 14 years prior to visit for a low grade ependymoma in the 4th ventricle. The large thoraco-lumbar intradural-extramedullary spinal cord tumor was surgically removed and the pathologic diagnosis was an anaplastic ependymoma. An adjuvant whole-spine radiation therapy for residual spine lesions was performed. After completion of radiation therapy, a MRI showed a near complete response and the disease was stable for three years.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Pre-operative outside thoracolumbar MR study showing a well demarcated and heterogeneously enhancing intradural extramedullary mass at the T12-L1 level. The spinal cord is considerably compressed by the tumor.
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Figure 1: Pre-operative outside thoracolumbar MR study showing a well demarcated and heterogeneously enhancing intradural extramedullary mass at the T12-L1 level. The spinal cord is considerably compressed by the tumor.

Mentions: The thoracolumbar MR image taken at a different hospital demonstrated an intradural-extramedullary mass involving T12 and L1 (Fig. 1). The tumor was 5.7 cm in size, dorsal in location, and was compressing the spinal cord. Emergency operation with a routine laminectomy of T12-L1 was performed. A gray-red intradural extramedullary mass was noted and was easily separated from the spinal arachnoid and completely removed without complication. Weakness and voiding difficulties experienced by the patient improved immediately after surgery.


Multiple spinal cord recurrences of an intracranial ependymoma after 14 years.

Hong S, Choe WJ, Moon CT - J Korean Neurosurg Soc (2013)

Pre-operative outside thoracolumbar MR study showing a well demarcated and heterogeneously enhancing intradural extramedullary mass at the T12-L1 level. The spinal cord is considerably compressed by the tumor.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3921283&req=5

Figure 1: Pre-operative outside thoracolumbar MR study showing a well demarcated and heterogeneously enhancing intradural extramedullary mass at the T12-L1 level. The spinal cord is considerably compressed by the tumor.
Mentions: The thoracolumbar MR image taken at a different hospital demonstrated an intradural-extramedullary mass involving T12 and L1 (Fig. 1). The tumor was 5.7 cm in size, dorsal in location, and was compressing the spinal cord. Emergency operation with a routine laminectomy of T12-L1 was performed. A gray-red intradural extramedullary mass was noted and was easily separated from the spinal arachnoid and completely removed without complication. Weakness and voiding difficulties experienced by the patient improved immediately after surgery.

Bottom Line: Ependymoma can spread via cerebrospinal fluid, but late spinal recurrences of intracranial tumor are very rare.We describe a case of a 33-year-old male who presented with multiple, delayed, recurrent lesions in the spinal cord from an intracranial ependymoma.The large thoraco-lumbar intradural-extramedullary spinal cord tumor was surgically removed and the pathologic diagnosis was an anaplastic ependymoma.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Radiation Oncology, Konkuk University School of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.

ABSTRACT
Ependymoma can spread via cerebrospinal fluid, but late spinal recurrences of intracranial tumor are very rare. We describe a case of a 33-year-old male who presented with multiple, delayed, recurrent lesions in the spinal cord from an intracranial ependymoma. The patient underwent gross total resection and postoperative radiation therapy 14 years prior to visit for a low grade ependymoma in the 4th ventricle. The large thoraco-lumbar intradural-extramedullary spinal cord tumor was surgically removed and the pathologic diagnosis was an anaplastic ependymoma. An adjuvant whole-spine radiation therapy for residual spine lesions was performed. After completion of radiation therapy, a MRI showed a near complete response and the disease was stable for three years.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus