Limits...
Changes of motor deactivation regions in patients with intracranial lesions.

Lee SH, Koh JS, Ryu CW, Jahng GH - J Korean Neurosurg Soc (2013)

Bottom Line: There is a rich literature confirming the default mode network found compatible with task-induced deactivation regions in normal subjects, but few investigations of alterations of the motor deactivation in patients with intracranial lesions.Therefore, we hypothesized that an intracranial lesion results in abnormal changes in a task-induced deactivation region compared with default mode network, and these changes are associated with specific attributes of allocated regions.THERE WERE ADDITIVE DEACTIVATED REGIONS ACCORDING TO INTRACRANIAL LESIONS: fusiform gyrus in cavernous hemangioma; lateral occipital gyrus in meningioma; crus cerebri in hemangiopericytoma; globus pallidus, lateral occipital gyrus, caudate nucleus, fusiform gyrus, lingual gyrus, claustrum, substantia nigra, subthalamic nucleus in GBM; fusiform gyrus in metastatic brain tumors.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Neurosurgery, Kyung Hee University Hospital at Gangdong, College of Medicine, Kyung Hee University, Seoul, Korea.

ABSTRACT

Objective: There is a rich literature confirming the default mode network found compatible with task-induced deactivation regions in normal subjects, but few investigations of alterations of the motor deactivation in patients with intracranial lesions. Therefore, we hypothesized that an intracranial lesion results in abnormal changes in a task-induced deactivation region compared with default mode network, and these changes are associated with specific attributes of allocated regions.

Methods: Blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) during a motor task were obtained from 27 intracranial lesion patients (mean age, 57.3 years; range 15-78 years) who had various kinds of brain tumors. The BOLD fMRI data for each patient were evaluated to obtain activation or deactivation regions. The distinctive deactivation regions from intracranial lesion patients were evaluated by comparing to the literature reports.

Results: THERE WERE ADDITIVE DEACTIVATED REGIONS ACCORDING TO INTRACRANIAL LESIONS: fusiform gyrus in cavernous hemangioma; lateral occipital gyrus in meningioma; crus cerebri in hemangiopericytoma; globus pallidus, lateral occipital gyrus, caudate nucleus, fusiform gyrus, lingual gyrus, claustrum, substantia nigra, subthalamic nucleus in GBM; fusiform gyrus in metastatic brain tumors.

Conclusion: There is increasing interest in human brain function using fMRI. The authors report the brain function migrations and changes that occur in patients with intracranial lesions.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

MRI and fMRI in a 56-year-old woman with glioblastoma (case 7). A: T1-weighted MRI with gadolinium demonstrating a large, well enhanced mass with central necrosis in the right middle frontal gyrus, which is compatible with gliobalstoma. B: Axial fMRI series during left hand motor task showing activation (orange) and deactivation (light-blue) regions. Arrowhead denote the distinctive deactivated regions.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3921271&req=5

Figure 3: MRI and fMRI in a 56-year-old woman with glioblastoma (case 7). A: T1-weighted MRI with gadolinium demonstrating a large, well enhanced mass with central necrosis in the right middle frontal gyrus, which is compatible with gliobalstoma. B: Axial fMRI series during left hand motor task showing activation (orange) and deactivation (light-blue) regions. Arrowhead denote the distinctive deactivated regions.

Mentions: Fig. 3 shows MR images with a gadolinium enhancement and the representative deactivation map from the case 7 in the Table 3. MR images with a gadolinium enhancement revealed a large, well enhanced mass with central necrosis, which was sized 4.7×3.3×4.8 cm and located in right middle frontal gyrus (Fig. 3A). Task based fMRI scans demonstrated that the left hemisphere had localization similar to healthy individuals, while activity ipsilateral to the tumor was shifted postero-laterally suggesting displacement of cortical tissue involved in sensorimotor function. In response to left hand motor task, there were widespread deactivations in both cerebral hemisphere including post-central gyrus, precuneus, medial frontal cortex, and posterior cingulate gyrus, which were already known as default mode region. However, some regions other than default mode region demonstrated significantly reduced activations for the same task. They include middle occipital gyrus, caudate nucleus, fusiform gyrus, and lingual gyrus (Fig. 3B). In response to right hand motor task, there were also deactivated regions over the both cerebral hemisphere, but the regions were limited to default mode region.


Changes of motor deactivation regions in patients with intracranial lesions.

Lee SH, Koh JS, Ryu CW, Jahng GH - J Korean Neurosurg Soc (2013)

MRI and fMRI in a 56-year-old woman with glioblastoma (case 7). A: T1-weighted MRI with gadolinium demonstrating a large, well enhanced mass with central necrosis in the right middle frontal gyrus, which is compatible with gliobalstoma. B: Axial fMRI series during left hand motor task showing activation (orange) and deactivation (light-blue) regions. Arrowhead denote the distinctive deactivated regions.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3921271&req=5

Figure 3: MRI and fMRI in a 56-year-old woman with glioblastoma (case 7). A: T1-weighted MRI with gadolinium demonstrating a large, well enhanced mass with central necrosis in the right middle frontal gyrus, which is compatible with gliobalstoma. B: Axial fMRI series during left hand motor task showing activation (orange) and deactivation (light-blue) regions. Arrowhead denote the distinctive deactivated regions.
Mentions: Fig. 3 shows MR images with a gadolinium enhancement and the representative deactivation map from the case 7 in the Table 3. MR images with a gadolinium enhancement revealed a large, well enhanced mass with central necrosis, which was sized 4.7×3.3×4.8 cm and located in right middle frontal gyrus (Fig. 3A). Task based fMRI scans demonstrated that the left hemisphere had localization similar to healthy individuals, while activity ipsilateral to the tumor was shifted postero-laterally suggesting displacement of cortical tissue involved in sensorimotor function. In response to left hand motor task, there were widespread deactivations in both cerebral hemisphere including post-central gyrus, precuneus, medial frontal cortex, and posterior cingulate gyrus, which were already known as default mode region. However, some regions other than default mode region demonstrated significantly reduced activations for the same task. They include middle occipital gyrus, caudate nucleus, fusiform gyrus, and lingual gyrus (Fig. 3B). In response to right hand motor task, there were also deactivated regions over the both cerebral hemisphere, but the regions were limited to default mode region.

Bottom Line: There is a rich literature confirming the default mode network found compatible with task-induced deactivation regions in normal subjects, but few investigations of alterations of the motor deactivation in patients with intracranial lesions.Therefore, we hypothesized that an intracranial lesion results in abnormal changes in a task-induced deactivation region compared with default mode network, and these changes are associated with specific attributes of allocated regions.THERE WERE ADDITIVE DEACTIVATED REGIONS ACCORDING TO INTRACRANIAL LESIONS: fusiform gyrus in cavernous hemangioma; lateral occipital gyrus in meningioma; crus cerebri in hemangiopericytoma; globus pallidus, lateral occipital gyrus, caudate nucleus, fusiform gyrus, lingual gyrus, claustrum, substantia nigra, subthalamic nucleus in GBM; fusiform gyrus in metastatic brain tumors.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Neurosurgery, Kyung Hee University Hospital at Gangdong, College of Medicine, Kyung Hee University, Seoul, Korea.

ABSTRACT

Objective: There is a rich literature confirming the default mode network found compatible with task-induced deactivation regions in normal subjects, but few investigations of alterations of the motor deactivation in patients with intracranial lesions. Therefore, we hypothesized that an intracranial lesion results in abnormal changes in a task-induced deactivation region compared with default mode network, and these changes are associated with specific attributes of allocated regions.

Methods: Blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) during a motor task were obtained from 27 intracranial lesion patients (mean age, 57.3 years; range 15-78 years) who had various kinds of brain tumors. The BOLD fMRI data for each patient were evaluated to obtain activation or deactivation regions. The distinctive deactivation regions from intracranial lesion patients were evaluated by comparing to the literature reports.

Results: THERE WERE ADDITIVE DEACTIVATED REGIONS ACCORDING TO INTRACRANIAL LESIONS: fusiform gyrus in cavernous hemangioma; lateral occipital gyrus in meningioma; crus cerebri in hemangiopericytoma; globus pallidus, lateral occipital gyrus, caudate nucleus, fusiform gyrus, lingual gyrus, claustrum, substantia nigra, subthalamic nucleus in GBM; fusiform gyrus in metastatic brain tumors.

Conclusion: There is increasing interest in human brain function using fMRI. The authors report the brain function migrations and changes that occur in patients with intracranial lesions.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus